Parlor Press Books

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1977: A Cultural Moment in Composition

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-040-3

Brent Henze, Jack Selzer, and Wendy Sharer

With Brian Lehew, Shannon Pennefeather, and Martin Schleuse

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Patricia Sullivan, Catherine Hobbs, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-040-3 (paperback, $27.00; £14.00; €19.00); © 2008 by Parlor Press. 188 pages, with illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index.

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-041-0 (hardcover, $55.00; £29.00; €39.00); 978-1-60235-042-7 (Adobe eBook on CD, $14.00)

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Description

A product of extensive archival research and numerous interviews, 1977: A Cultural Moment In Composition examines the local, state, and national forces (economic, political, cultural, and academic) that fostered the development of the first-year composition program at one representative site, Penn State University, in the late 1970s. Sidebar commentaries from Stephen A. Bernhardt, Hugh Burns, Sharon Crowley, Lester Faigley, Janice Lauer, Elaine Maimon, Jasper Neel, and John Warnock—many of whom were just beginning in the field in 1977—enrich and complicate the story. In the emerging tradition of program-based histories, such as Barbara L’Eplattenier and Lisa Mastrangelo’s Historical Studies of Writing Program Administration (Parlor Press, 2005), 1977: A Cultural Moment in Composition offers a counterpoint to broader institutional histories of composition by investigating how local phenomena can be explained by larger movements and how larger movements can be understood through local contexts.

About the Authors

Brent Henze is Associate Professor of English at East Carolina University. His research on the rhetoric of science, reporting genres in ethnological science, scientific institutions, and the scientific treatment of racial difference has appeared in Technical Communication, Technical Communication Quarterly, Rhetoric Review, and elsewhere.

Jack Selzer is Professor of English and Associate Dean for Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in the College of the Liberal Arts at Penn State. Currently President of the Rhetoric Society of America, he is the author, coauthor, editor, or coeditor of Kenneth Burke in Greenwich Village , Kenneth Burke in the 1930s , Kenneth Burke and His Circles (Parlor Press, 2008), Rhetorical Bodies , Understanding Scientific Prose, and Good Reasons .

Wendy Sharer is Associate Professor of English and Director of Composition at East Carolina University. She is the author of Vote and Voice: Women’s Organizations and Political Literacy, 1915-1930 (2004) and co-editor of Rhetorical Education in America (2004). Her work appears in several edited collections, as well as in journals such as Rhetoric Review and Rhetoric Society Quarterly .

Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1 Introduction

2 Background I: The Cultural Scene in 1977

3 Background II: English Studies in 1977

4 Composition in 1977: The National Conversation

5 Composition in 1977: A Close Look at a Material Site

6 Responding to the Crisis: Conversing about Composition at Penn State in 1977

Notes
Sources Consulted and Cited
Index

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Advances in the History of Rhetoric: The First Six Years

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-037-3

Edited by Richard Leo Enos and David E. Beard, with Sarah L. Yoder and Amy K. Hermanson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-037-3 (paperback, $34.00). 436 pages, with bibliographies, and index © 2007 by Parlor Press

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-038-0 (hardcover, $65.00); 978-1-60235-039-7 (Adobe eBook on CD, $20.00)

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Description

Advances in the History of Rhetoric: The First Six Years is a comprehensive collection of 29 scholarly essays published during the first phase of the journal’s history. Research from prominent and developing scholars that was once difficult to acquire is now offered in a coherent and comprehensive collection that is complemented by a detailed index and unified bibliography. This collection covers a range of periods and topics in the history of rhetoric, including Greek and Roman rhetoric, rhetoric and religion, women in the history of rhetoric, rhetoric and science, Renaissance and British rhetorical theory, rhetoric and culture, and the development of American rhetoric and composition. The editors, Richard Leo Enos and David E. Beard, provide a preface and afterword that synthesize the mission and meaning of this work for students and scholars of the history of rhetoric.

About the Author

Richard Leo Enos is Professor and Holder of the Lillian Radford Chair of Rhetoric & Composition - History of Rhetoric at Texas Christian University.

David E. Beard is Assistant Professor of Writing Studies at the University of Minnesota, Duluth.

Contents and Contributors

Preface: Our Title Is Our Mission Statement
Richard Leo Enos

1 Beyond Dichotomy: The Sophists’ Understanding of Antithetical Thought
Valerie V. Peterson

2 Hermagoras’ Theory of Prose Oikonomia in Dionysius of Halicarnassus
Robert Stephen Reid

3 The Teaching of the Progymnasmata of Pedro Juan Núñez (Valencia 1529–1602)
Ferran Grau Codina

4 Erasmus’s Irenic Rhetorical System
Bohn D. Lattin

5 Neglected Texts of Olympe de Gouges, Pamphleteer of the French Revolution of 1789
Mary Cecilia Monedas

6 Samuel P. Newman’s A Practical System of Rhetoric : The Evolution of a Method
Beth L. Hewett

7 Visions of the Probable: The Transition from Rhetorical to Mathematical Models of Probability
Terri Palmer

8 A Rhetorical Liturgy: Ephesians I and the Problem of Race Relations in the Early Christian Church
Gary S. Selby

 9 “Danced through Every Labyrinth of the Law”: Benjamin Austin on Rhetoric as Virtue and Vice in Early American Legal Practice
Sean Patrick O’Rourke

10 The Human Genome Project: Novel Approaches, Probable Reasoning, and the Advancement of Science
Charlotte A. Robidoux

11 Let’s Re-Enact Rhetoric’s History
John C. Adams

12 Leading Lady or Bit Part: The Role of the History of Rhetoric in Communication Education
Glen McClish

13 Encomium on Helen as Advertisement: Political Life According to Gorgias the Barbarian
Michael William Pfau

14 Upholding the Values of the Community: Normative Psychology in Aristotle’s Rhetoric
Ulrike Zinn Jaeckel

15 Enacting the Roman Republic: Reading Pliny’s Panegyric Rhetorically
Davis W. Houck

16 Hrotsvit, Strong Voice of Gandersheim
Janet B. Davis

17 Classical and Christian Conflicts in Keckermann’s De rhetoricae ecclesiasticae utilitate
Jameela Lares

18 Rethinking the History of African-American Self-Help Rhetoric: From Abolition to Civil Rights and Beyond
Jacqueline Bacon

19 Historical Continuity and the Politics/Rhetoric of Democracy: Solonian Reforms and the Council of 400
Davis W. Houck

20 Recognizing a Rhetorical Theory of Figures: What Aristotle Tells Us About the Relationship Between Metaphor and Other Figures of Speech
Sara Newman

21 Disciplinary Relations in Ancient and Renaissance Rhetorics
Robert Gaines

 22 Walter Pater and the Rhetorical Tradition: Finding Common Sense in the Particular
Lois Peters Agnew

 23 Contemporary Pedagogy for Classical Rhetoric: Averting the Reductionism of Classical Opposition
David Timmerman

 24 Rhetoric, Civic Consciousness, and Civic Conscience: The Invention of Citizenship in Classical Greece
Christopher Lyle Johnstone

 25 Motives for Practicing Shakespeare Criticism as a “Rational Science” in Lord Kames’s Elements of Criticism
Beth Innocenti Manolescu

 26 Sentimental Journey: The Place and Status of the Emotions in Hugh Blair’s Rhetoric
Sean Patrick O’Rourke

27 Who Measures “Due Measure”? or, Kairos Meets Counter- Kairos: Implications of Isegoria for Classical Notions of Kairos
Jerry Blitefield  

28 “Time Appeases Anger”: The Rhetorical-Political Temporality of the Paradigmatic Passion of Orge in Aristotle’s Rhetoric and Politics
Renu Dube

29 Augustan Rhetoric: The Declining Orator
Ilon Lauer  

Afterword: Moments of Opportunity in the History of Rhetoric
David E. Beard  

Appendix: A Brief History of the American Society for the History of Rhetoric
Bibliography of Classical Authors
Bibliography
Index

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Ancient Non-Greek Rhetorics

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-094-6

Edited by Carol S. Lipson and Roberta A. Binkley

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Catherine Hobbs, Patricia Sullivan, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-094-6 (paperback, $30.00 , £22.00, €24.00, $37.00 CAD) © 2009 by Parlor Press. 316 pages, with notes, illustrations, bibliography, and index

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-095-3 (hardcover, $60.00, £44.00, €48.00, $74.00 CAD) 978-1-60235-096-0 (Adobe eBook, $16.00, £12.00, €14.00, $20 CAD)

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Description

Ancient Non-Greek Rhetorics contributes to the recovery and understanding of ancient rhetorics in non-Western cultures and other cultures that developed independently of classical Greco-Roman models. Contributors analyze facets of the rhetorics as embedded within the particular cultures of ancient China, Egypt, Mesopotamia, the ancient Near East more generally, Israel, Japan, India, and ancient Ireland. The ten essays examine rhetorics as broadly construed, analyzing texts, addressing silence, as well as considering the placement and use of texts as part of multimedia cultural communication, involving ritual along with oral, visual, sensual, experiential, and architectural elements and performances.

Contributors include Roberta Binkley, Richard Johnson-Sheehan, Carol S. Lipson, Yichun Liu, Arabella Lyon, Steven B. Katz, Marie Lee Mifsud, Scott R. Stroud, James W. Watts, Xiaoye You, and Kathy Wolfe.

About the Editors

Carol S. Lipson is Professor of Writing and Rhetoric, and immediate past chair of the Writing Program at Syracuse University.  She received her PhD in English at the University of California–Los Angeles, where she began the study of Egyptology. She has published on ancient Egyptian medical rhetoric, on the multimedia nature of ancient Egyptian public texts, and on the central Egyptian value of Maat in relation to the culture’s rhetorical principles. With Roberta Binkley, she co-edited Rhetoric Before and Beyond The Greeks (SUNY Press, 2004). 

Roberta Binkley received her PhD in rhetoric from the University of Arizona.  Subsequently she has taught at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and at Arizona State University.  Her research has focused on Near Eastern rhetoric in early Mesopotamia, with particular attention to the works of the priestess and poetess Enheduanna. With Carol S. Lipson, she co-edited Rhetoric Before and Beyond The Greeks.

Contents

Acknowledgments

1 Introduction, Carol S. Lipson

Religious Rhetoric of the Ancient Near East

2 Ritual Rhetoric in Ancient Near Eastern Texts, James W. Watts
3 The Gendering of Prophetic Discourse: Women and Prophecy in the Ancient Near East, Roberta Binkley
4 Rhetoric and Identity: A Study of Ancient Egyptian Non-Royal Tombs and Tomb Autobiographies, Carol S. Lipson
5 The Hebrew Bible as Another, Jewish Sophistic: A Genesis of Absence and Desire in Ancient Rhetoric, Steven B. Katz

Rhetorical Studies of the Ancient Far East

6 Reading the Heavenly Mandate: Dong Zhongshu’s Rhetoric of the Way (Dao), Yichun Liu and Xiaoye You
7 “Why Do the Rulers Listen to the Wild Theories of Speech-Makers?” Or Wuwei, Shi, and Methods of Comparative Rhetoric, Arabella Lyon
8 The Right Use of True Words: Shinto and Shingon Buddhist Rhetoric in Ancient Japan, Kathy Wolfe

Rhetoric from Ancient India

9 Storytelling as Soul-Tuning: The Ancient Rhetoric of Valmiki’s Ramayana. Mari Lee Mifsud
10 Argument in Classical Indian Philosophy: The Case of Śankara’s Advaita Vedānta, Scott R. Stroud

An Ancient Western Non-Greek Rhetoric: Ancient Ireland

11 Orality, Magic, and Myth in Ancient Irish Rhetoric, Richard Johnson-Sheehan

Contributors
Index

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Argument in Composition

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-109-7

John Ramage, Micheal Callaway, Jennifer Clary-Lemon, Zachary Waggoner

Reference Guide to Writing Across the Curriculum coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-109-7 (paperback; $30.00; £19.00; €22.00; $34.00 CAD); © 2009 by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse; 272 pages, with glossary, annotated bibliography, works cited, and index.

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-110-3 (hardcover; $60.00; £38.00; €44.00; $68.00 CAD); 978-1-60235-111-0 (Adobe eBook; $16.00;  £11.00; €12.00; $19.00 CAD); also available at the WAC Clearinghouse: http://wac.colostate.edu/

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Description

Argument in Composition provides access to a wide range of resources that bear on the teaching of writing and argument. The ideas of major theorists of classical and contemporary rhetoric and argument—from Aristotle to Burke, Toulmin, and Perelman—are explained and elaborated, especially as they inform pedagogies of argumentation and composition. John Ramage, Micheal Callaway, Jennifer Clary-Lemon, and Zachary Waggoner present methods of teaching informal fallacies and analyzing propaganda, while also providing a rationale for preferring an argument approach over other available approaches to the teaching of writing. The authors also identify the role of argument in pedagogies that are not overtly called argument, including pedagogies that foreground feminism, liberation, critical cultural studies, writing across the curriculum, genre, service learning, technology, and visual rhetoric. The lists of further reading and the annotated bibliography provide opportunities for learning more about the approaches presented in this indispensable guide.

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition Logo

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Charles Bazerman
Published jointly by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse

About the Authors

John Ramage is Emeritus Professor at Arizona State University and the author of numerous books, including Rhetoric: A User’s Guide (2005) and (with John Bean and June Johnson) Writing Arguments. Micheal Callaway is Residential Faculty at Mesa Community College in Mesa, Arizona, where he focuses on teaching and developing curriculum for developmental writing courses. Zachary Waggoner teaches courses in rhetoric, composition, videogame theory, and new teaching assistant education at Arizona State University. He is the author of My Avatar, My Self: Identity in Video Role-Playing Games (McFarland, 2009). Jennifer Clary-Lemon is Assistant Professor of Rhetoric at the University of Winnipeg. She is co-editor, with Peter Vandenberg and Sue Hum, of Relations, Locations, Positions: Composition Theory for Writing Teachers (NCTE, 2006) and has published work in Composition Studies, American Review of Canadian Studies, and (with Maureen Daly Goggin and Duane Roen) the Handbook of Research on Writing.

Contents

Series Editor’s Preface
Preface

1 Introduction: Why Argument Matters

Coming to an Understanding of Argument
John Leo, “Cultural Relativism Leaves Some Blind to Evil”
Stanley Fish, “Condemnation without Absolutes”
Discussion of Leo and Fish Part I: Some Theoretical Background
Discussion of Leo and Fish Part II: Getting from Duality to Commitment
Leo and Fish Part III: The Elements of Argument
Argument and “the purification of war”
Why Students Need Argument
Argument and Critical Literacy
Argument and Identity
Ethics and Argument
Notes

2 The History of Argument

Philosophy vs Rhetoric
Rhetoric’s Ossification Problem
Key Figures of Modern Argument Theory
Introduction to Kenneth Burke
Introduction to Chaim Perelman and Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca
Stephen Toulmin
Summary
Notes

3 Issues in Argument

The Fallacy Debate
The Pragma-Dialectical Approach to Fallacies
Alternatives to Focusing on Argument in a Writing Class: Critical/Cultural Studies
Expressivist Pedagogy
Procedural Rhetoric
To Teach or Not to Teach . . . Propaganda
What Is Propaganda? Burke and Ellul
Propaganda in a Nutshell
Notes

4 Introduction to Best Practices

What Works in Teaching Writing
Best Practices
Liberatory Rhetoric
Works Cited
For Further Reading
Argument Textbooks
Scholarly Works

Feminism and Argument
Works Cited
For Further Reading
Argument Textbooks
Scholarly Works

Service Learning and Argument
Works Cited
For Further Reading
Argument Textbooks
Scholarly Works

Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) and Writing in the Disciplines (WID)
Works Cited
For Further Reading
Argument Textbooks
Scholarly Works—General
Anthropology
Business
Economics
Engineering
Political Science
Computers and Writing
Works Cited
For Further Reading
Textbooks
Scholarly Works

Visual Rhetoric
Works Cited
For Further Reading
Textbooks
Scholarly Works

5 Glossary of Terms

6 Annotated Bibliography

Works Cited
Index
About the Authors

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Au Japon: The Memoirs of a Foreign Correspondent in Japan, Korea, and China, 1892–1894

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-128-8

Amédée Baillot de Guerville, Translated, Annotated, and with an Introduction by Daniel C. Kane

Au Japon coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-128-8 (paperback; $30.00; £20.00; €22.00; $34.00 CAD; $36.00 AUS); 978-1-60235-129-5 (hardcover; $60.00; £40.00; €44.00; $68.00 CAD; $72.00 AUS); 978-1-60235-130-1 (Adobe eBook, $18.00; £13.00; €14.00; $20.00 CAD; $22.00 AUS). © 2009 by Parlor Press. 230 pages, with introduction, illustrations, bibliography, glossary, appendices, and index.

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Description

What they were saying in 1904 . . .

“Monsieur de Guerville is a passionate, and perhaps overly partial, friend of Japan. What he describes for us [in Au Japon] is what he himself witnessed—the festivals, the dinners, and the prominent and picturesque customs of the common people . . . Here is not a single figure, not a statistic, but vivid sketches that cut to the quick, and which, without sacrificing accuracy, offer up all the delights of a charming novel.” — L’Illustration (1904)

In Au Japon “[A. B. de Guerville] recounts some of his experiences in this country and sets forth his opinions about what he saw and heard. . . . The style is thoroughly French; that is to say, light, clear and graceful, and the matter is always interesting. What strikes us especially is that the author takes such trouble to contradict the gross exaggerations published in 1895 about the Port Arthur affair. Mr. de Guerville was among the newspaper correspondents who entered the place immediately after the fight and he is therefore in a position to speak positively. His verdict is this: ‘ . . . there was no butchery and no general massacre.’” —Japan Weekly Mail (1904)

In what was by all appearances a relatively short life, Amédée Baillot de Guerville was by turns an instructor of French at a women’s college, a newspaper and magazine owner and editor, Honorary Commissioner for the World’s Columbian Exhibition, popular lecturer, war correspondent, author, and general “globe-trotter.” Immigrating to the United States as a very young man in the 1880s, de Guerville gained his widest fame as a New York based correspondent and lecturer in the 1890s, before returning to his native France in 1898. In Au Japon (1904), de Guerville recounts with mostly comical gaze—and perhaps a touch of imagination—his experiences in the Far East during the years 1892 and 1894. As the author himself confesses, “each of us sees things in our own way.” After a century, that of Monsieur de Guerville is worth rediscovering.

In addition to translating the original French, Daniel C. Kane provides a thorough introduction, a glossary of key figures, a chronology of de Guerville’s publications, and an index.

Writing Travel Series
Edited by Jeanne Moskal

About the Author

Amédée Baillot de Guerville (1869-1911) was a French war correspondent and travel writer whose books include Au Japon (1904), La Lutte contre la tuberculose (1904), and La Nouvelle Egypte, ce qu’on dit, ce qu’on voit du Caire à Fashoda. 1905). He was a lecturer in French at Milwaukee Women’s College and later served as the Honorary Commissioner of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.

About the Translator

Daniel Kane received his BA in French and History from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale in 1992. After a time in Korea in the military he went on to study Korean History at the University of Hawaii, where he received his MA in 1999. He is currently completing a doctorate in Korean history from the University of Hawaii.

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Between the Twilight and the Sky

$12.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-085-4

Jennie Neighbors

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Cover of Between the Twilight and the SkyInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-085-4 (paperback, $12.00; £8.00; €10.00; $14.00 Can); 92 pages, © 2008 by Parlor Press

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-086-1 (Adobe eBook, $12.00; £8.00; €10.00; $14.00 Can)

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What others are saying about Between the Twilight and the Sky

Say a moth alights, trembling, on a page. Between its wings and the page is a poem—in fact, the poem seems to be an articulation of this space. The words of the poem are drawn from the residuum of a library—classical myth, philosophy, poetry—as it traces the liminal membrane between perception and voice, voice and mind. Between the Twilight and the Sky, Jennie Neighbors’s stunning collection, reverberates in the interstices “between the unimaginable and the incomplete” “like a river announcing its depth and extremity.” At its heart, affection, capacity, “as music that winds.”
—Ann Lauterbach

Jennie Neighbors’s new book Between the Twilight and the Sky is a brilliant, engaging adventure for the reader. Great poems in three Cantos wherein we are brought into “the direction the poem must travel” and find “the anomalous you must meet to become.” Hers is a “music that winds.”
—Robin Blaser

About the Author

Jennie Neighbors lives in Spartanburg, SC, with her husband, Jim, and son, Esten. She is a Wisconsin Arts Board Fellow, a graduate of Naropa University’s MFA Program and a recipient of their Ted Berrigan Memorial Fellowship. Her poems have appeared in journals of innovative writing such as Osiris, Dirigible, and gestalten. She teaches at Wofford College.

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Free Verse Editions is a joint venture between Free Verse: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry & Poetics and Parlor Press. The series will publishes three to five books of poetry per year, collections that use language to dramatize a singular vision of experience, a mastery of craft, a deep knowledge of poetic tradition, and a willingness to take risks. Please review the series description for more information.

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Bibliographic Research in Composition Studies

$24.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-131-8

Vicki Byard

Reference Guide to Writing Across the Curriculum coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-131-8 (paperback; $24.00; £17.00; €18.00; $28.00 CAD; $29.00 AUS); 978-1-60235-132-5 (hardcover; $50.00; £34.00; €37.00; $57.00 CAD; $59.00 AUS); 978-1-60235-133-2 (Adobe eBook; $14.00; £9.00; €11.00; $17.00 CAD; $18.00 AUS) © 2009 by Parlor Press. 172 pages, with glossary, annotated bibliography, works cited, and index.

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Description

Bibliographic Research in Composition Studies is a student-friendly guide to how knowledge is constructed and disseminated in composition studies, as well as a thorough handbook on how to conduct bibliographic research in the discipline. Student readers are taught Stephen North's taxonomy of scholarship, empirical research, and practice so that they can better contextualize the sources they read, and they learn the unique ways that some genres of publication function in composition studies. The book also leads students through the entire process of completing a bibliographic assignment. Students learn to search for and select pertinent sources effectively, how to use major databases and other bibliographic resources to conduct a comprehensive search for disciplinary knowledge, and how to draft and revise an annotated bibliography and a review of literature. Four appendices offer additional support in understanding libraries, journals, and databases, all as they pertain to research in composition studies. The book helps students make sense of a broadly defined discipline and prepares them to become active and independent learners, as well as original contributors to the unending conversation in composition studies.

Bibliographic Research in Composition Studies is the first volume in Parlor Press's new Lenses on Composition Studies series, which features texts written specifically for upper-level undergraduate and entry-level graduate courses in composition studies.Lenses on Composition Studies Logo

Lenses on Composition Studies
Edited by Sheryl Fontaine and Steve Westbrook

About the Author

Vicki Byard is Professor of English at Northeastern Illinois University, located in Chicago, where she currently serves as the Coordinator of the First-Year Writing Program. She teaches first-year and upper-level writing courses, as well as graduate-level theory and research courses in an MA composition program. Previously, she authored the Instructor's Resource Manual for the first and second editions of The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing, and she is a frequent presenter at national conferences in composition studies. She received her MA and PhD in rhetoric and composition from Purdue University.

Contents

1 Directions to the Parlor: The Need for a Guide to Scholarship in Composition Studies

The Need for Student-Centered Introductions to Composition Studies
The Need for Bibliographic Instruction in Academia
The Need for Bibliographic Instruction in Composition Studies
Suggestions for Using This Book
Some Cautions about This Book
Works Cited
For Further Reading

2 Voices in the Parlor: The Construction of Knowledge in Composition Studies

Scholarship
Definition of Scholarship
Examples of Scholarship
Advice for Locating Scholarship
Empirical Research
Definition of Empirical Research
Examples of Empirical Research
Advice for Locating Empirical Research
Practice
Definition of Practice
Examples of Practice
Advice for Locating Practice
Hybrid Knowledge
Works Cited
For Further Reading

3 Genres in the Parlor: The Dissemination of Knowledge in Composition Studies

Books and Edited Collections
Print and Electronic Journals
Theses and Dissertations
Professional Organizations’ Websites, Position Statements, and Conventions
Mailing Lists and Their Archives
Works Cited
For Further Reading

4 Approaching the Parlor’s Threshold: Preparing for Your Bibliographic Search in Composition Studies

Assessing Your Library’s Resources
Identifying Your Search Terms
Keywords
Controlled Vocabulary
Understanding Web Search Options
Boolean Operators
Advanced Search Options
Search Histories
Establishing Your Criteria for Sources
Quantity
Credibility
Relevance
Timeliness
Cumulative Merit
Choosing a Documentation Style
MLA
APA
Reference Management Software
Works Cited
For Further Reading

5 Your Hosts for the Parlor Conversation: Major Databases and Bibliographies in Composition Studies

Five Databases Essential to Composition Studies
CompPile
WorldCat
MLA International Bibliography
ERIC
JSTOR
Additional Bibliographic Resources
Dissertation Indexes
Journals’ Websites
Other Online Bibliographies
Print Bibliographies
Works Cited

6 Synthesizing the Parlor Conversation: Completing Bibliographic Assignments in Composition Studies

The Bibliographic Search Process
Identifying Your Citations
Evaluating and Refining Your Bibliography Draft
Obtaining Hard Copies of Your Sources
Writing Bibliographic Assignments
Writing an Annotated Bibliography
Writing a Literature Review
Joining the Scholarly Conversation
Works Cited
For Further Reading

Appendix A: Assessing Your Library Resources
Appendix B: Scholarly Journals in Composition
Appendix C: Inclusion of Composition Journals in Periodical Indexes
Appendix D: Journals Holdings in Nearby Libraries
Index
About the Author

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Blood Orbits

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-123-3

Ger Killeen

Free Verse Editions
Series Editor: Jon ThompsonCover of Blood Orbits

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-123-3 (paperback; $14.00; £10; €11.00; $16.00 CAD) 978-1-60235-124-0 (Adobe eBook; $12.00; £9.00; €10.00; $14.00 CAD) ; © 2009 by Parlor Press; 86 pages.

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Description

Blood Orbits is a series of poems and prose poems exploring various conceptualizations of history both as a generative principle of meaning and as particular contexts and events through which we shape our subjectivities.

In language that is richly musical and startlingly surreal, these poems interrogate and confront narratives that encode oppression, violence, and dishonesty, both the “grand narratives” which structure our place in history as well as the stories that we as individuals tell ourselves to make sense of our lives in their dailiness.

The events confronted in these poems are refracted through various consciousnesses using speaking voices that emerge from a whole spectrum of narrators, some reliable, some not, some linear in the way their language operates, some not. These events include the years of the Terror after the French Revolution, the opening up of the American West, the early exploration of the Arctic, and various colonial adventures.

In writing that is at once philosophically sophisticated and restlessly energetic, the poetry of Blood Orbits brings to life what Wallace Stevens called “the hum of thoughts evaded in the mind,” exploring ideas as ideas, but also evolving a poetic language that squarely confronts the consequences, whatever they may be, of those ideas in real human lives.

Literary influences on this work include Paul Celan, Susan Howe, Walter Benjamin and Elizabeth Willis.

About the Author

Ger Killeen teaches in the Department of English and Writing at Marylhurst University near Portland, Oregon. His special interests are postmodern poetry, Celtic literature, the poetry of mysticism, and critical theory. He is the author of several books, including A Stone That Will Leap Over the Waves (Trask House, 1999), A Wren (Bluestem Press, winner of the Bluestem Award for Poetry), and Signs Following (Parlor Press, 2005). His work also appears in several anthologies, including From Here We Speak (Oregon State University Press), American Poetry: The Next Generation (Carnegie-Mellon University Press), and The Gertrude Stein Awards 2006 (Green Integer).

Contents

Calendar
The Abyss of the Birds
To The Counterglow
The Translator’s Dream
Finisterre
Blood Orbits
First Flesh
Tenebrae
Twinberry
Winged Book

Figures and Grounds

1. Vendémiare
2. Brumaire
3. Frimaire
4. Nivôse
5. Pluviôse
6. Ventôse
7. Germinal
8. Floréal
9. Prairial
10. Messidor
11. Thermidor
12. Fructidor
Approaching The Barricade
Introduction To The Topography of Oregon
In the Margin of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Land Grant
Hegelian Meditations
One Negative Way Of Looking At A Blackbird

Erebus and Terror

1. An Excellent Observation of the Sun in Quicksilver
2. Comparing the Merits of the Two Routes
3. In England There Is Nothing New
4. Hereabout the Larch Trees End
5. One Small Repeating Reflecting Circle
6. Reasons for My Engaging Hope as a Steersman
7. The Coruscation Reassumed the Horseshoe Form
8. Numerous Stone Marks and Several Caches
9. Beyond the Floating Light
10. The Translation of Her Indian Name Is Burnt Weed
11. The Shingly Point of which I Have Spoken Light Keeper
September 1914
Gallipoli
Letters From The Front, 1906 – 2006
Jocasta
Tree Alphabet
Gallia
Shannon Mercury
Sea of Cortez
A Shelter in Copan
Ulisse
Paula/Paul/Frank/Frances
Influenza
Surety, Part A
Thoughts From A Garden

Notes
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Free Verse Editions

Blood Orbits

Ger Killeen

(To Simone Weil)

Prayermower, periodic
comet.

Of the perennial verbs
nothing left

but the stalks.              You keep one
step ahead, out-

traveling the snowline,
the interrogation cell,

the gnomon’s testscalpel.
You listen for silence

where the crowing calipers
browse on the zodiac.

You feed yourself
through the pummeled lips

one more night

Thoughts from a Garden

Ger Killeen

The hour darkens favorably.
May it be that fiery
groundsel, sword vetch
defect from this plot
walled by friezes of luminous
nostalgias. Absence makes
meaning meander,
a sap-acid eating
its way out of symbol
like the miraculous tears
of an icon erasing
the eyes they slide from.

On the outside
edges, in the supressed
collisions between the arclighted
intervals, the fictive
weeds of the future
uncurl in the overripe smoke,
begin their obscure push.

Fabulous the time which is
alive, again.

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Price: $14.00

The Book of the Floating World

$16.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-013-7

Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-013-7 ($16.00; expanded edition, paperback); © 2007 by Parlor Press. 101 pages with photographs and notes

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Read the poem and image "Double Exposure" (pdf format):

or "Traffic" (pdf format):

Reviews of the Original Edition (2004)

Word For/Word: A Journal of New Writing #8 (2005). "The poems in The Book of the Floating World are poems of increasing complexity. That is to say, for me, reading the book twice, three times, ten times, has layered its subject(s) further and further behind the sighting of the opaque lens, while simultaneously bringing more layers to the surface."
— Brandon Shamoda

Octopus Magazine, #4 (Dec. 2004). "The lyrics in this book reward slow and thoughtful re-readings. The photography and poetry are haunting." 
—Marcus Slease

What other people say about The Book of the Floating World . . .

The poems, like their photographs, begin with still objects, with ourselves outside, looking in through time and culture. Suddenly the scenes come alive and we see a surprising compassion and beauty rise up. Each poem holds startling links between the floating samsaric world and a calm inquirer. We are looking at a by-gone Japan; we are looking at our current selves.
— John Balaban, author of Locusts at the Edge of Summer: New and Selected Poems and Spring Essence

If history is the patient work of interpreting those records of the dead that are left to us, Jon Thompson’s searching poems are genuinely historical—acts of listening and looking with a complex, and empathetic, attention. These poems, with their grave cadences and moral clarity, in the end counter the blinding white light of disaster that suffuses them.
— Susan Stewart, author of Columbarium and Poetry and the Fate of the Senses

In The Book of the Floating World, the poet imagines his way into the past, constructing his dead father’s experience of occupation Japan, and at the same time reflecting eloquently on the fallibility of such an endeavor. With his only evidence a group of photographs taken by his father, Thompson moves beyond those particular images to summon up vivid fragments of scenes cradled in the narrator’s subtle, intelligent consciousness. The poems are elegant, elegiac meditations on the nature of personal history and mortality. In the book as a whole, the continuous and arresting conjunctions of past and present give The Book of the Floating World a quality of timelessness.
—Angela Davis-Gardner, author of the novels Felice and Forms of Shelter

Part moral memoir, part imagined life of the father, part imagined history, part solid history, this unusual combination of verbal and visual—of the then seen from the perspective of now—makes a rare and interesting book.
—Betty Adcock, author of The Difficult Wheel and Intervale

Description

Loosely based upon photographs of Occupied Japan, The Book of the Floating World ranges across a war-ravaged landscape, from a shattered Tokyo to scenes of a depleted countryside, with a close examination of the lives constructed out of that ruin. The Book of the Floating World explores the photographed moment—and poetry—as a peculiar and arresting instance of witness. Threaded throughout this collection is a set of interrelated meditations upon history, violence, war, memory, and art itself.

First published in 2004, The Book of the Floating World is offered here in a new expanded edition, complete with all the original photographs of Japan during the American Occupation—the starting point for Jon Thompson’s elegiac poetry. In their clarity and openness, these photographs frame the struggle between old and new identities taking shape in the postwar era. This new edition of The Book of the Floating World represents a ground-breaking collaboration between the visual and the literary in a format that traces the hidden connections between past and present.

About the Author

Jon Thompson is an associate professor of English at North Carolina State University, where he teaches courses in twentieth century literature. In addition to his publications in poetry, he has published Fiction, Crime and Empire (University of Illinois Press, 1993). He also edits Free Verse: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry & Poetics and is the editor of Parlor Press’s poetry series, Free Verse Editions.

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Price: $16.00

Building Genre Knowledge

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-112-7

Christine M. Tardy

Second Language Writing
Series Editor: Paul Kei Matsuda

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-112-7 (paperback, $32.00; £21.00; €24.00; $38.00 CAD); 978-1-60235-113-4 (hardcover, $65.00; £41.00;  €48.00; $76.00 CAD); 978-1-60235-114-1 (Adobe eBook, $18.00; £13.00; €14.00; $22.00 CAD); © 2009 by Parlor Press; 331 pages, with illustrations, notes, and bibliography.

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Communicating ScienceDownload the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format; 80 kb).


Description

Building Genre Knowledge traces the writing of four multilingual graduate students in engineering and computer sciences over time, offering a window into the writers’ processes in developing increasingly sophisticated knowledge of academic and professional genres. These in-depth longitudinal case studies follow the writers’ trajectories through the overlapping settings of writing classrooms, disciplinary content classrooms, and scholarly research. The writers’ texts, interview discussions, professors’ feedback, and classroom experiences together construct a rich picture of the conflicts that they encounter and the learning resources available to them in different settings over time.   

Through close examination of the stories of these writers, Building Genre Knowledge articulates a theory of genre knowledge development that allows for complexity across individuals, communities, and tasks. After first outlining an accessible model of genre knowledge that encompasses multiple knowledge domains, the book explores the ways in which writers develop increasingly sophisticated genre knowledge as they move through their graduate education.

Adopting an interdisciplinary perspective, Building Genre Knowledge provides a unique look into the processes of building genre knowledge while offering a dynamic theory of those processes that is inclusive of both monolingual and multilingual writers—a necessary move in today’s linguistically diverse classrooms. It will therefore be of great interest to researchers and practitioners in both first and second language writing studies.

About the Author

Christine M. Tardy is an Assistant Professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse at DePaul University in Chicago, where she serves as Graduate Director and teaches courses in writing, teacher education, and applied linguistics. She has taught English as a second or foreign language in the U.S., Czech Republic, Japan, and Turkey. She has published extensively in the areas of genre and discourse studies, second language writing, and academic writing instruction.

Contents

Acknowledgments
1 Genre and Genre Knowledge
2 The Researcher and the Writers
3 Learning through Other People’s Words
4 Genre Analysis in the Writing Classroom
5 Accumulated Exposure and the Learning of a Multimodal Genre
6 Repeated Practice: Lab Reports in the Graduate Classroom
7 The Culmination of Graduate Research: Learning to Write a Master’s Thesis
8 Writing for/in a Discipline: First Forays into the Larger Research World
9 Building Genre Knowledge
Appendices A-E
Notes
References
Index

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Price: $32.00

Child in the Road

$15.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-029-8

Cindy Savett

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Cover of The Wash

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-029-8 (paperback; $15.00 £8.00); 144 pages, © 2007 by Cindy Savett

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-031-1 (cloth; $30.00; £16.00); 978-1-60235-030-4 (Adobe eBook; $14.00; £7.00)

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Description

Child in the Road is a mother’s response to the sudden death of her young daughter, a rendering of the wide range of emotions experienced afterwards--not description, but an expression of grief from its center. The poems pull vivid imagery from the deepest layers of the unconscious, postcards from a sleepwalker unable to find rest, waking again and again in the wrong story. Who is alive and who is dead? What does it mean to go on living, “eyes searching / under the earth”?

What others are saying about Child in the Road

With a rare combination of intensity fused to grace, the poems in Cindy Savett’s first collection, Child in the Road, feel as if they might have been written by a sailor who walked the plank and disappeared into the depths.  The poems care nothing for the events or ordinary logic of life on land. They never come up for air­ and don’t seem to have to.  It is as if Savett created each line with an extraordinary lung capacity, so that her poetry can live at the bottom of the ocean of the unconscious —enabling us to live there, too. . . . The poems shape a brilliant coral reef discovered in the waters of a turbulent dream.
—Molly Peacock, author of Cornucopia: New & Selected Poems

I read Child in the Road as one long poem, lyric, meditative, wheeling, fierce; for all its richness of language, it seems to be reaching for some place beyond language, from which to mourn the death of a young child:

bless this plate of bones
bless this twisted flight
this first of hours
bless this carrying horse
knees bent
on Mother’s Trail.

—Jean Valentine, author of The Cradle of the Real Life and
the 2004 National Book Award winner, Door in the Mountain

About the Author

Cindy Savett teaches poetry workshops at mental institutions in the Philadelphia area and has published her poetry in a wide variety of journals. Born and raised in the Philadelphia area, she currently lives in Merion, Pennsylvania, with her husband and children.

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Free Verse Editions is a joint venture between Free Verse: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry & Poetics and Parlor Press. The series will publishes three to five books of poetry per year, collections that use language to dramatize a singular vision of experience, a mastery of craft, a deep knowledge of poetic tradition, and a willingness to take risks. Please review the series description for more information.

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Price: $15.00

Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Local Publics

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-056-4

Elenore Long

Reference Guide to Writing Across the Curriculum coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-056-4 (paperback, $30.00, £16.00, €20.00); © 2008 by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse; 316 pages, with glossary, annotated bibliography, works cited, and index.

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-057-1 (hardcover, $60.00, £32.00, €40.00); 978-1-60235-058-8 (Adobe eBook, $12.00, £7.00, €8.00); also available at the WAC Clearinghouse: http://wac.colostate.edu/

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Description

Offering a comparative analysis of community-literacy studies, Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Local Publics traces common values in diverse accounts of “ordinary people going public.” Elenore Long offers a rich theoretical framework for reviewing emergent community-literacy projects, examines pedagogies that educators can use to help students to go public in the course of their rhetorical education at college, and adapts local-public literacies to college curricula. A glossary and annotated bibliography provide the basis for further inquiry and research.

What others are saying about Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Local Publics

Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Local Publics is the perfect entry to the exuberant practice of literacy in community. It brings contemporary research to life—in people, stories, and purposes. And it documents the amazingly diverse ways ordinary people go public.”
—Linda Flower, Carnegie Mellon

Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Local Publics begins to articulate a history for community literacy studies, and such a history is essential for helping us figure out where we are going with this area of inquiry. Long provides a new set of tools as well, and her local publics framework, in particular, will prove valuable to researchers and teachers alike.”
—Jeff Grabill, Michigan State

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition Logo

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Charles Bazerman
Published jointly by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse

About the Author

After completing a postdoctoral fellowship through Pittsburgh’s Community Literacy Center and Carnegie Mellon University, Elenore Long continued to direct community-literacy initiatives with Wayne Peck and Joyce Baskins. With Linda Flower and Lorraine Higgins, she published Learning to Rival: A Literate Practice for Intercultural Inquiry. They recently published a fifteen-year retrospective for the Community Literacy Journal. She currently directs the composition program and Writers’ Center at Eastern Washington University.

Contents

Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
Common Abbreviations
1 Introduction and Overview
What This Book Doesn’t Do

2 Definitions and Distinctions
The Local Public Framework
Guiding Metaphor
Context
Tenor of the Discourse
Literacies
Rhetorical Invention

3 Locating Community Literacy Studies
Two Prior Accounts
Situating the Study of Literacy in the Public Realm
Documenting and Theorizing Local Public Discourse
Situating the Study of Participatory Democracy
Ideas about Actually Existing Democracy
Rhetorical Interventions to Support Democratic Engagement

4 An Impromptu Theater: A Local Public That Turns Its Back on Formal Institutions
Distinctive Features: Dramatic and Spontaneous
The Impromptu Theater in Context: Location, Power, and the Integrity of Community Life
Tenor of the Discourse: Edgy and Competitive, Curbed by Play
Performative Literacies
Rhetorical Invention: Practice, Modeling, and Feedback
Implications

5 The Cultural Womb and the Garden: Local Publics That
Depend on Institutions to Sponsor Them
A Cultural Womb: The Local Public in Brandt’s Literacy in American Lives
Distinctive Features: Nurtures and Prepares
The Cultural Womb in Context: Location and Cultural Agency
Tenor of the Discourse: Resourceful
Interpretative Literacies
Rhetorical Invention: Inspiration, Instruction, and Transformation
Implications
A Garden: The Local Public in Heller’s Until We Are Strong Together
Distinctive Features: Nurtures and Prepares
The Garden in Context: Location, Agency, and Maturation
Tenor of the Discourse: Literary Uplift
Belletristic Literacies
Rhetorical Invention: Precision at the Point of Utterance
Implications

6 The Link and Gate: Local Publics That Intersect with Public Institutions
A Link: The Local Public Sphere in Barton and Hamilton’s Local Literacies
Distinctive Features: Linking Networks Across Domains
The Link in Context: Location, Bottom- Up Initiative, and Agency
Tenor of the Discourse: Hybrid—a Mix of the Formal and the Everyday
Mobilizing Literacies
Rhetorical Invention: Adapting and Retooling
Implications
A Gate along a Fenceline: The Local Public in Cushman’s The Struggle and the Tools
Distinctive Features: Access, Space, and Conflict
The Gate in Context: Location and Linguistic Agency
Tenor of the Discourse: Dueling Dualities
Institutional Literacies
Rhetorical Invention: Evaluating Acquired Literacies
Transferred to New Contexts
Implications

7 The Community-Organizing Effort and the Community Think Tank: Local Publics Forged in Partnership with Formal Institutions
A Community-Organizing Effort: The Local Public in Goldblatt’s “Alinsky’s Reveille: A Community-Organizing Model for Neighborhood- Based Literacy Projects"
Distinctive Features: Complexity and Pleasure The Community-Organizing Effort in Context: Location and Legacy
Tenor of the Discourse: Bite Tempered by Sweetness
Consensus-Building Literacies
Rhetorical Invention: Transforming Problems into Issues for Action
Implications
The Community Think Tank: The Local Public Sphere in Flower’s “Intercultural Knowledge Building: The Literate Action of a Community Think Tank"
Distinctive Features: Diversity, Conflict, and Tools
The Community Think Tank in Context: Location and Legacy
Tenor of the Discourse: Prophetic—Principled and Inventive
Design and Inquiry-Driven Literacies
Rhetorical Invention: The Construction of Negotiated Meaning
Implications

8 The Shadow System: A Local Public That Defies Formal Institutions
Distinctive Features: Mimics and Shelters Difference
The Shadow System in Context: Location and Cultural Imaginary
Tenor the Discourse: Threatening and Hyperbolic
Tactical Literacies
Rhetorical Invention: Cultural Appropriation
Implications

9 Pedagogical Practices
Overview
Interpretative Pedagogies
Institutional Pedagogies
Tactical Pedagogies
Inquiry-Driven Pedagogies
Materialist Rhetoric: Realizing Practical Outcomes through Consensus
Intercultural Inquiry: Restructuring Deliberative Dialogues around Difference
Performative Pedagogies
Conclusion

10 Glossary
11 Annotated Bibliography
Notes
Works Cited
About the Author
Index

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Price: $30.00

Composing a Community: A History of Writing Across the Curriculum

$29.00
SKU: 1-932559-17-5

Edited by Edited by Susan H. McLeod and Margot Iris Soven

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Patricia Sullivan, Catherine Hobbs, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
1-932559-17-5 ($29.00; £16.75; paperback); © 2006 by Parlor Press. 216 pages, with Index and Bibliography

Other Formats Available
1-932559-25-6 ($58.00; £33.50; cloth); 1-932559-81-7 ($14.00; £8.00; Adobe eBook)

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Description

Writing across the curriculum is experiencing a renaissance in institutions across the country. People starting or restarting WAC programs will want to read Composing a Community: A History of Writing Across the Curriculum.

Composing a Community is not only a history of early WAC programs but also of how the people developing those programs were in touch with one another, exchanging ideas and information, forming first a network and then a community. Composing a Community captures the stories of pioneers like Elaine Maimon, Toby Fulwiler, and others, giving readers first-hand accounts from those who were present at the creation of this new movement. David Russell’s introduction sets this emergent narrative into relief.

Contributors

Susan H. McLeod and Margot Iris Soven, themselves pioneers in WAC history, have assembled some of its most eloquent voices in this collection: Charles Bazerman, John C. Bean, Toby Fulwiler, Anne Herrington, Carol Holder, Peshe C. Kuriloff, Linda Peterson, David R. Russell, Christopher Thaiss, Barbara E. Walvoord, and Sam Watson. Their style is personal, lively, and informal as the authors succeed in putting their personal memories in the larger context of WAC studies.

About the Editors

Susan H. McLeod is Professor of Writing and Director of the Writing Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has published widely on writing across the curriculum and composition. In 2006, she will publish Writing Program Administration in Parlor Press’s series, Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition.

Margot Iris Soven is Professor of English at La Salle University and is currently the Director of the Core Curriculum and the Writing Fellows Program. She has published widely on writing across the curriculum and composition. Her latest book is What the Writing Tutor Needs to Know (Thomson Wadsworth, 2006).

Contents

Introduction: WAC’s Beginnings: Developing a Community of Change Agents, David R. Russell

  1. It Takes a Campus to Teach a Writer: WAC and the Reform of Undergraduate Education, Elaine P. Maimon
  2. University-Schools Partnership: WAC and the National Writing Project at George Mason University, Christopher Thaiss
  3. Circles of Interest: The Growth of Research Communities in WAC and WID/WIP, Charles Bazerman and Anne Herrington
  4. The Start of Writing in the Disciplines/Writing Across the Curriculum in the California State University System, Carol R. Holder and Susan H. McLeod
  5. WAC Becomes Respectable: The University of Chicago Institutes on Writing and Higher Order Reasoning, Margot Soven
  6. Writing across the Curriculum in the Ivy Consortium, Peshe Kuriloff and Linda Peterson
  7. Montana, Mina Shaughnessy, and Microthemes: Reflections on WAC as a Community, John C. Bean
  8. Still a Good Place to Be: More than 20 Years of the National Network of WAC Programs, Christopher Thaiss
  9. Gender and Discipline in Two Early WAC Communities: Lessons for Today, Barbara E. Walvoord
  10. Writing Across the Michigan Tech Curriculum, Toby Fulwiler, with Additions by Art Young
  11. My Story of Wildacres, 1983–1998, Sam Watson

About the Authors
Index

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Price: $29.00

The Country of Lost Sons

$14.00
SKU: 1-932559-14-0

Jeffrey Thomson

Information and Pricing
1-932559-14-0 ($14.00, paperback); © 2004 by Parlor Press. 84 pages

Other Formats Available
1-932559-15-9 ($26.00, cloth); 1-932559-16-7 ($12.00 Adobe eBook)

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Reviews

David Mark Book Reviews (11/16/2015)

Description

Jeffrey Thomson’s second collection of poems, The Country of Lost Sons, investigates the narrative environment of childhood, especially the way violence is inscribed on children through myth, culture, and legend. The poems trace the growth of the author’s young son (his vulnerability and equal potential for violence) across a landscape of rewritten myth and narrative. From the Trojan War (bracketed as it is by the deaths of two children, Iphegenia and Astyanax) through the Biblical accounts of Job, Jeremiah, and Jephthah to the modern tragedies of the war in Kosovo, AIDS, and the contemporary culture of violence, the poems build to a culmination of fear that is only tempered by love, grace, and the redemptive power of storytelling itself.

What people are saying about The Country of Lost Sons . . .

In the midst of so many fast-talking contemporary poetry books comes Jeffrey Thomson’s lovely The Country of Lost Sons. Here is a book that chooses tender, meditative music over electric chatter. Here are the poems that tell us poetry can still explore and heal earnestly. More than praise, I want to offer gratitude for such an intimate book. After reading it, you will want to offer gratitude too.
— Terrance A. Hayes

If horror is a given in the world, what place exists for beauty? If children are given in ransom to the gods, what parent can give thanks? The Country of Lost Sons takes Job’s children, and Jephthah’s daughter, and Hector’s son, lost at Troy, and fashions from their stories a cautionary chronicle for our own place and time, where love aspires to the condition of protection, but protection serves merely as prelude to elegy.
—Lynne McMahon

Jeffrey Thomson’s The Country of Lost Sons imagines a land where the aggrieved and the grieving come wounded together, across borders of time and nation, epochs of loss and resurrection. There, they are redeemed, if not in fact then in his poems’ muscular music and flint-edged wisdom. So many things “hiss” in these poems—shoes, doors, paper, even grass—we sense the horror lurking within daily graces. It’s this horror Thomson interrogates and then reinvents in the deadly flight of Philoctetes’s arrow and his own son’s small-fisted punch. Beneath the city’s shattered walls—ours, after all—Thomson raises the “terrible blessing of hope.”
—Kevin Stein

The Country of Lost Sons, Jeffrey Thomson’s brilliant new book, shows the poet to be a man deeply read in western and world literature, a poet who sees the past and present, life and art, as inseparable, and yet this knowledge is never forced, never pretentious—just a vital part of life as we live it day to day. How else can we understand the joys and horrors we live except in the context of everyone’s joys and horrors, the book seems to ask. That knowledge and the passion of its saying tips everything toward joy.
—Andrew Hudgins

About the Author

Jeffrey Thomson is the author of four books of poems, including Birdwatching in Wartime (Carnegie Mellon 2009) and Renovation (Carnegie Mellon 2005). Also forthcoming is a an anthology of emerging poets: From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate, Alliterate, and Just Plain Sound Great co-edited with Camille Dungy and Matt O'Donnell (Persea Books, 2009). 

His awards include a 2005 Literature Fellowship in Poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts, a 2006 Creative Artists Fellowship in Literature from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the 2008 Felllowship in the Literary Arts from the Maine Arts Commission, as well as fellowships from the Wesleyan Writers Conference, the Sewanee Writers Conference and Writers @ Work.

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Price: $14.00

13 ways of happily

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-202-5

Books 1 & 2

Emily Carr

Winner of the New Measure Poetry Prize
Chosen "Top 11 (Canadian) Poetry Books of 2011" by Rob McLennan

Free Verse Editions
Series Editor: Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-202-5 (paperback, $14; £10, $15 CAD, €12, $16 AUS); 978-1-60235-203-2 (Adobe eBook, $12, £9, $13 CAD, €10, $14 AUS). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 75 pages.

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What People Are Saying . . .

“If ostranenie—to make strange—is the mandate of contemporary poetry, Emily Carr has achieved this both brilliantly and beautifully. Kaleidoscopic in its glimmering slivers, the life she brings us is built of charged familiars slightly and completely changed: the sun turns on its stem; the stallion rolls in a pasture of blue ether.  Although she references poetic antecedents from Wallace Stevens and William Carlos Williams to Joan Retallack and Mary Ruefle, it’s not their voices, but their facility for invention, itself here reinvented, that keeps waking us up into a world sometimes alarming, often unsettling, and always careening until we, too, arrive ‘delirious & shredded, sailing sideways through the greenly ravished vowels.’”  —Cole Swensen

“The poems of Emily Carr’s 13 ways of happily are like the butterflies of which she writes, “all-mond & a-mind white an ecstasy of crystalline palimpsest” sprouting “wings in the mind.” They waver across imagination’s field, alight on detail or insight, “flimmer on the dream’s / cobweb.” God and angels in wry company with the “plush octopus,” the particular songbird, the Pepsi ad. Carr is alert to the environmental “surround,” her poems delicate fronds of the observable world as it touches upon the window of inner plane. One reads a Carr poem first in wonder, for each poem is a tensile condensation that startles then dazzles. One returns, though, to ponder the profound stillness at the heart of 13 ways of happily.”  —Cynthia Hogue

“What I find most appealing is that this book seems a living sensibility, as if I can feel its vibrancy in my hands. It has the intellectual curiosity and linguistic verve that power so much current poetry, but without any cynical disdain for traditional lyricism and figurative language. In fact, its fractured, episodic nature seems to push metaphor toward fresh ways of honoring both the microcosmic and the metaphysical, toward places where “phytoplankton in a raindrop echo” and “love . . . is a sail at the end of the world.” The overall effect is expansive and exotic—a “mirage of buoyant polyglot” that remains grounded in immediate sensory and emotive experience, yet channels and extends that experience throughout even the most self-conscious formal innovation. There is a brilliant mind at work here, and an open heart—and the result is strangely beautiful.” —Mark Cox

About the Author

Emily Carr’s first book, directions for flying (Furniture Press), was the winner of the 2009 Furniture Press Poetry Prize. Her chapbook, the story will fix you it is there outside your &, was published in Toadlily Press’s 2009 Quartet Series. In 2010, Emily was a Poetry Fellow at the Vermont Studio Center & Writer in Residence at the Jack Kerouac House. You can read her work in recent issues of Prairie Schooner, The Spoon River Poetry Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, The Journal, Bombay Gin, Margie, Interim, Caketrain, Phoebe, Fourteen Hills, The Capilano Review, So To Speak, dusie, and Versal.

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A Critical Look at Institutional Mission: A Guide for Writing Program Administrators

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-840-9

Edited by Joseph Janangelo

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-840-9 (paperback, $32) 978-1-60235-841-6 (hardcover, $65) 978-1-60235-842-3 (PDF, $20). © 2016 by Parlor Press. 261 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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What People Are Saying

"As a WPA who recently transitioned into being a department chair, I was pulled in from the first paragraph. . . . A Critical Look at Institutional Mission is a welcome gap-filler, focusing on the 'mission' as a fulcrum for academic writing/program-building activities. I think it's a critical collection that confronts the rhetorical power of institutional goals rather than connecting alignment to a more ethereal 'big bad.' . . . [T]he book focuses on the mission statement as an artifact that offers insight into our institutional discussions about what we value, how we imagine learning to happen, and how we publicly circulate those ideas."

—Colin Charlton, Co-author, GenAdmin: Theorizing WPA Identities in the Twenty-First Century

Description

A Critical Look at Institutional Mission: A Guide for Writing Program Administrators helps writing program administrators and writing center directors understand how their work is fueled and constrained by institutional mission. It offers provocations for reflection, conversation, and strategic stewardship of writing programs and writing centers. Mission is a central concept in millennial academe. For many two- and four-year colleges, mission denotes the distinctive institutional history and traditions of practice colleges use to serve students. Yet some traditions may be at odds with marketplace drivers, such as recruitment and retention, institutional rebranding, and social change. WPAs and writing center directors may struggle to reconcile historical practice with contemporary work in civic engagement, undergraduate research, academic advancement, general education, LGBTQI advocacy, and support for students of color.

In A Critical Look at Institutional Mission: A Guide for Writing Program Administrators, contributors discuss the complications of teaching and administrating within specific institutional cultures. Reflecting on the restrictions they face, these scholars remind us that our work is rarely ours alone—that we work in community with others, for others, and within institutional contexts and imperatives. Con­tributors include Nicholas N. Behm, Anita R. Cortez, Dominic DelliCarpini, Anita M. DeRouen, Andrea Rosso Efthymiou, Lauren Fitzgerald, Kristine Hansen, Jason Hoppe, Joseph Janangelo, Andrew Jeter, Joyce Kinkead, Jeffrey Klausman, Rita Malenczyk, Steve Price, Lauren Rosenberg, and Farrell J. Webb.

About the Editor

Joseph Janangelo is Associate Professor of English at Loyola University Chicago and Past President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. He co-edited Resituating Writing: Constructing and Administering Writing Programs with Kristine Hansen and Theoretical and Critical Perspectives on Teacher Change. His work has appeared in College Composition and Communication, College English, The Writing Center Journal, and WPA: Writing Program Administration.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Of Provocations and Possibilities
Joseph Janangelo

Part I: Connecting and Contending
1 Community Engagement and Authentic Writing: Institutional Mission as Centripetal and/or Centrifugal Force
Dominic DelliCarpini

2 Transcending Institutional Boundaries and Types: Undergraduate Research
Joyce Kinkead

3 Strategic Assessment: Using Dynamic Criteria Mapping to Actualize Institutional Mission and Build Community
Nicholas N. Behm

4 Creating a Program of Success for Underrepresented Students at Research Institutions
Farrell J. Webb and Anita R. Cortez

Part II: Designing and Discerning
5 Out of the Ivory Tower and into the Brand: How the New Two-Year College Mission Shapes the Faculty-Manager
Jeffrey Klausman

6 The Pen and the Drone: Manumotive Writing Programs and the Professional Imagination at West Point
Jason Hoppe

7 The BYU English Department's Future Scholars Program: Planning for a Faculty to Match the Institutional Mission
Kristine Hansen

8 Designing and Delivering General Education Curriculum at a Small Liberal Arts College
Anita M. DeRouen

Part III: Relating, Reflecting, and Resisting
9 When Fantasy Themes Collide: Implementing a Public Liberal Arts Mission in Changing Times
Rita Malenczyk and Lauren Rosenberg

10 Negotiating Institutional Missions: Writing Center Tutors as Rhetorical Actors
Andrea Rosso Efthymiou and Lauren Fitzgerald

11 People Make the Place: Using an Evolving Mission as a Secondary School Teacher and Program Development Tool
Andrew Jeter

12 Same-Sex Marriage at a Jesuit University: Institutional Integrity and Social Change
Joseph Janangelo

Afterword
Steve Price
Contributors
Index
About the Editor

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A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-433-3

Edited by Rita Malenczyk

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-433-3 (paperback, $40); 978-1-60235-434-0 (hardcover, $80; ships 15 August 2013); 978-1-60235-435-7 (Adobe eBook, $25) © 2013 by Parlor Press. 471 pages with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Influenced by Erika Lindemann’s A Rhetoric for Writing Teachers, A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators delineates the major issues and questions in the field of writing program administration and provides readers new to that field with theoretical lenses through which to view those issues and questions. In brief and direct though not oversimplified chapters, A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators explains the historical and theoretical background of such concepts as “academic freedom,” “first-year composition,” “basic writing,” “writing across the curriculum,” “placement,” “ESL,” “general education,” and “transfer. ” Its thirty-nine contributors are seasoned writing program and center administrators who, in a range of voices, map the discipline of writing program administration and guide readers toward finding their own answers to solving problems at their own institutions. Edited by Rita Malenczyk, contributors include Linda Adler-Kassner, Paul V. Anderson, Chris M. Anson, Hannah Ashley, William P. Banks, Mary R. Boland, Christiane Donahue, Doug Downs, Lauren Fitzgerald, Tom Fox, Chris W. Gallagher, Roger Gilles, Gregory R. Glau, Eli Goldblatt, Robert M. Gonyea, Kristine Hansen, Susanmarie Harrington, Douglas Hesse, Melissa Ianetta, Joseph Janangelo, Seth Kahn, Neal Lerner, Rita Malenczyk, Peggy O’Neill, Charles Paine, Melody Pugh, E. Shelley Reid, Kelly Ritter, Shirley K Rose, Dan Royer, Carol Rutz, Eileen E. Schell, David E. Schwalm, Gail Shuck, Martha A. Townsend, Elizabeth Vander Lei, Elizabeth Wardle, Irwin Weiser, and Stephen Wilhoit.

About the Editor

Rita Malenczyk is Professor of English and Director of the Writing Program and Writing Center at Eastern Connecticut State University, where she has directed the writing program since 1994 and the writing center since 2008. Her work on writing program and center administration has appeared in numerous journals (including WPA: Writing Program Administration) and edited collections, including Kelly Ritter and Paul Kei Matsuda’s Exploring Composition Studies and Shirley Rose and Irwin Weiser’s The WPA as Theorist. With Susanmarie Harrington, Keith Rhodes, and Ruth Overman Fischer, she co-edited The Outcomes Book. She is currently the President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction, with Some Rhetorical Terms, Rita Malenczyk

Part One: Initial Questions

1 What Are Students?, Kelly Ritter
2 What Is Placement?, Dan Royer and Roger Gilles
3 What Is Basic Writing?, Hannah Ashley
4 What Is First-Year Composition?, Doug Downs
5 What Is ESL?, Gail Shuck
6 What Are Writing Across the Curriculum and Writing in the Disciplines?, Martha A. Townsend

Part 2: Complicating Questions

7 What Is General Education?, Lauren Fitzgerald
8 What Is Institutional Mission?, Elizabeth Vander Lei and Melody Pugh
9 What Is Pre-College Credit?, Kristine Hansen
10 What Is Transfer Articulation?, David E. Schwalm
11 What Is Transfer?, Elizabeth Wardle
12 What Is Assessment?, Susanmarie Harrington

Part 3: Personal Questions

13 What Is a Writing Instructor?, Eileen E. Schell
14 What Is Faculty Development?, Carol Rutz and Stephen Wilhoit
15 What Is TA Education?, E. Shelley Reid
16 What Is A Union?, Seth Kahn
17 What Is the Writing Center?, Neal Lerner

Part Four: Helpful Questions

18 What Is a Writing Program History?, Shirley K Rose
19 What Are The Administration and The Budget? (And Why Are We Talking About Them Together?, Irwin Weiser
20 What Is NSSE?, Charles Paine, Robert M. Gonyea, Chris M. Anson, and Paul V. Anderson
21 What Is the National Writing Project?, William P. Banks
22 What Is Community Literacy?, Eli Goldblatt

Part Five: Vexed Questions

23 What Is Class Size?, Gregory R. Glau
24 What Are Institutional Politics?, Tom Fox and Rita Malenczyk
25 What Is Academic Freedom?, Mary R. Boland
26 What Are Educational Standards?, Peggy O’Neill
27 What Is Policy?, Chris W. Gallagher

Part Six: Eternal Questions

28 What Is an English Department?, Melissa Ianetta
29 What Is The Intellectual Work of Writing Program Administration?, Joseph Janangelo
30 What Is WPA Research?, Christiane Donahue
31 What Is Principle?, Linda Adler-Kassner
32 What Is a Personal Life?, Douglas Hesse
Contributing Authors
Index

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A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators 2e

$45.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-846-1

Second Edition

Edited by Rita Malenczyk

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-846-1 (paperback, $45) 978-1-60235-847-8 (hardcover, $90) 978-1-60235-848-5 (PDF, $25) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 541 pages, with notes, bibliography, illustrations, and index.

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Description

A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators (2nd Edition) presents the major issues and questions in the field of writing program administration. The collection provides aspiring, new, and seasoned WPAs with the theoretical lenses, terminologies, historical contexts, and research they need to understand the nature, history, and complexities of their intellectual and administrative work. Each of the thirty-six chapters asks a direct question about an issue WPAs will need or want to answer, including such concepts as institutional politics, retention, technology, WAC, placement, ESL, general education, transfer, and many more. Its forty-four contributors are experienced writing program and writing center administrators who, in a diverse range of voices, map the discipline and help readers find their own ways to identify and solve problems at home institutions. Now in its Second Edition, A Rhetoric for Writing Program Administrators, includes new essays on technology, threshold concepts, retention, and independent writing programs. Many other essays have been updated to reflect emergent concerns in higher education and WPA work.

Edited by Rita Malenczyk, contributors include Linda Adler-Kassner, Paul V. Anderson, Chris M. Anson, Hannah Ashley, William P. Banks, Mary R. Boland, Christiane Donahue, Doug Downs, Heidi Estrem, Lauren Fitzgerald, Tom Fox, Chris W. Gallagher, Jeffrey M. Gerding, Roger Gilles, Gregory R. Glau, Eli Goldblatt, Robert M. Gonyea, Kristine Hansen, Susanmarie Harrington, Douglas Hesse, Melissa Ianetta, Joseph Janangelo, Richard Johnson-Sheehan, Seth Kahn, Neal Lerner, Barry Maid, Rita Malenczyk, Peggy O'Neill, Charles Paine, Pegeen Reichert Powell, Melody Pugh, E. Shelley Reid, Kelly Ritter, Shirley K Rose, Dan Royer, Carol Rutz, Eileen E. Schell, David E. Schwalm, Dawn Shepherd, Gail Shuck, Martha A. Townsend, Elizabeth Vander Lei, Elizabeth Wardle, Irwin Weiser, and Stephen Wilhoit.

About the Editor

Rita Malenczyk is Professor of English and Director of the Writing Program and Writing Center at Eastern Connecticut State University, where she has directed the writing program since 1994 and the writing center since 2008. Her work on writing program and center administration has appeared in numerous journals and edited collections. She served as the President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators from 2013 until 2015.

Contents

Preface to the Second Edition
Introduction, with Some Rhetorical Terms
Rita Malenczyk

Part One: Initial Questions
1 What Are Students?
Kelly Ritter

2 What Is Placement?
Dan Royer and Roger Gilles

3 What Is Basic Writing?
Hannah Ashley

4 What Is First-Year Composition?
Doug Downs

5 What Are Threshold Concepts (and Why Are They Useful for Writing Programs)?
Linda Adler-Kassner and Elizabeth Wardle

6 What Is ESL?
Gail Shuck

7 What Is Technology?
Jeffrey M. Gerding and Richard Johnson-Sheehan

Part 2: Complicating Questions
8 What Are Writing Across the Curriculum and Writing in the Disciplines?
Martha A. Townsend

9 What Is General Education?
Lauren Fitzgerald

10 What Is Institutional Mission?
Elizabeth Vander Lei and Melody Pugh

11 What Is Pre-College Credit?
Kristine Hansen

12 What Is Transfer Articulation?
David E. Schwalm

13 What Is Transfer?
Elizabeth Wardle

14 What Is Assessment?
Susanmarie Harrington

15 What Is Retention?
Heidi Estrem, Pegeen Reichert Powell, and Dawn Shepherd

Part 3: Personal Questions
16 What Is a Writing Instructor?
Eileen E. Schell

17 What Is Faculty Development?
Carol Rutz and Stephen Wilhoit

18 What Is TA Education?
E. Shelley Reid

19 What Is a Union?
Seth Kahn

20 What Is the Writing Center?
Neal Lerner

Part Four: Helpful Questions
21 What Is a Writing Program History?
Shirley K Rose

22 What Are The Administration and The Budget? (And Why Are We Talking About Them Together?)
Irwin Weiser

23 What Is NSSE?
Charles Paine, Robert M. Gonyea, Chris M. Anson, and Paul Anderson

24 What Is the National Writing Project?
William P. Banks

25 What Is Community Literacy?
Eli Goldblatt

Part Five: Vexed Questions
26 What Is Class Size?
Gregory R. Glau

27 What Are Institutional Politics?
Tom Fox and Rita Malenczyk

28 What Is Academic Freedom?
Mary R. Boland

29 What Are Educational Standards?
Peggy O'Neill

30 What Is Policy?
Chris W. Gallagher

Part Six: Eternal Questions
31 What Is an Independent Writing Department/Program?
Barry Maid

32 What Is an English Department?
Melissa Ianetta

33 What Is The Intellectual Work of Writing Program Administration?
Joseph Janangelo

34 What Is WPA Research?
Christiane Donahue

35 What Is Principle?
Linda Adler-Kassner

36 What Is a Personal Life?
Douglas Hesse

Contributors
Index

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Price: $45.00

A Rhetoric of Literate Action: Literate Action, Volume 1

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-473-9

Charles Bazerman

Perspectives on Writing Series (The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-473-9 (paperback, $27); 978-1-60235-474-6 (hardcover; $60); 978-1-60235-475-3 (Adobe ebook, $20) © 2014 by Charles Bazerman. 174 pages with notes and bibliography.

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Description

Literate Action, in its two volumes, makes an indispensable contribution to writing studies.  Undertaken by one of the most learned and visionary scholars in the field, this work has a comprehensive and culminating quality to it, tracking major lines of insight into writing as a human practice and articulating the author’s intellectual progress as a theorist and researcher across a career.

“This volume—A Rhetoric of Literate Action—may be one of the most radical articulations of ‘the basics’ of writing ever offered.  In the face of a doggedly conservative instructional context that still treats writing skill as a matter of following the rules, the author excavates the much deeper psychological and sociological processes from which writing emerges and with which it must synchronize. . . .Attending to such elements as time, stance, and action, along with genre, intertext, process, and other elements, the work offers a generative vocabulary handy as both an inventional and diagnostic tool for ‘the sophisticated writer,’ as Bazerman calls the ideal audience for this work.  It is a refreshingly honest treatment of the difficult work of writing. It is filled with useful examples.”

Deborah Brandt

About the Author

Charles Bazerman, Professor of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is the author of numerous research articles and books on the social role of writing, academic genres, and textual analysis, as well as textbooks on the teaching of writing.

Contents

Introduction
1. Rhetorics of Speaking and Writing  
2. Knowing Where You Are: Genre  
3. When You Are   
4. The World of Texts: Intertextuality  
5. Changing the Landscape: Kairos, Social Facts, and Speech Acts  
6. Emergent Motives, Situations, Forms  
7. Text Strategics   
8. Emergent Form and the Processes of Forming Meaning   
9. Meanings and Representations  
10. Spaces and Journeys for Readers: Organization  and Movement   
12. Managing Writing Processes and the Emergent Text  
References  

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Price: $27.00

A Theory of Literate Action: Literate Action, Volume 2

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-477-7

Charles Bazerman

Perspectives on Writing Series (The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-477-7 (paperback, $27); 978-1-60235-478-4 (hardcover; $60); 978-1-60235-479-1 (Adobe ebook, $20) © 2014 by Charles Bazerman. 225 pages with notes and bibliography.

Read about A Rhetoric of Literate Action: Literate Action, Volume 1

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Download the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format).


Description

Literate Action, in its two volumes, makes an indispensable contribution to writing studies.  Undertaken by one of the most learned and visionary scholars in the field, this work has a comprehensive and culminating quality to it, tracking major lines of insight into writing as a human practice and articulating the author’s intellectual progress as a theorist and researcher across a career.

A Theory of Literate Action makes a significant contribution to the field and enriches and deepens our perspectives on writing by drawing together such varied and wide-ranging approaches from social theory and the social sciences—from psychology, to phenomenology, to pragmatics—and demonstrating their relevance to writing studies. While much has been made of the ‘social turn’ in the field of Rhetoric and Composition, the impact of social theory and social sciences on rhetorical theory and literacy studies has not been as fully explored—nor have these approaches been gathered together in one comprehensive text, to my knowledge.  — Mary Jo Reiff  

I have followed Charles Bazerman’s thinking closely over the years, but seeing it all together allowed me to see what I had not seen in it: how cognitive psychology (even neurobiology) intersects with social psychology and then sociology; how attentional processes and motive/emotion relate to genre; the historical insights; all up and down, macro micro meso. This work leads in so many productive directions. I’ve taken pages of notes. — David R. Russell

About the Author

Charles Bazerman, Professor of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is the author of numerous research articles and books on the social role of writing, academic genres, and textual analysis, as well as textbooks on the teaching of writing.

Contents

Introduction
1. The Symbolic Animal and the Cultural Transformation of Nature
2. Symbolic Selves in Society: Vygotsky on Language and Formation of the Social Mind
3. Active Social Symbolic Selves: Vygotskian Traditions
4. Active Social Symbolic Selves: The Phenomenological Sociology Tradition
5. Active Social Symbolic Selves: The Pragmatic Tradition within American Social Science
6. Social Order: Structural and Structurational Sociology
7. From the Interaction Order to Shared Meanings
8. Linguistic Orders
9. Utterances and Their Meanings
10. The World in the Text: Indexed and Created
11. The Writer on the Spot and on the Line
References

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An Unchanging Blue: Selected Poems 1962-1975

$18.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-198-1

Rolf Dieter Brinkmann

Translated by Mark Terrill

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-198-1 (paperback, $18; £13; $19 CAD  €14; $19 AUS). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 221 pages, in English and German.

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What Others Are Saying . . .


Description

Rolf Dieter Brinkmann’s radical poetics was unique in postwar German literature. His primary influences were Gottfried Benn, European modernism and the French nouveau roman. In the 1960s these influences were merged with William Carlos Williams, Frank O’Hara and Ted Berrigan (the latter two of which Brinkmann translated into German). Brinkmann’s strong affiliation with the New American Poetry provided a reverse-angle, cross-cultural perspective on one of the liveliest epochs in American letters, with a decisively German slant. His permanent confrontation with the postwar German literary establishment (reminding one at times of Jack Spicer and his place in American poetry), and his envelope-pushing experiments with language, syntax and semantics (taken to the extreme in Westwärts 1 & 2), led him further and further away from the literary scene. His confrontational nature and volatile personality were feared at readings, and together with his huge creative output and his early death, earned him a reputation as the “James Dean of poetry,” a true enfant terrible of contemporary letters.

An Unchanging Blue provides a generous sampling of translations (with German originals) taken from ten collections of Rolf Dieter Brinkmann’s poetry published between 1962 and 1975. An extensive introduction by Mark Terrill contextualizes Brinkmann’s place in postwar German literature.

Maybe the only genius in the postwar literature of West Germany. —Heiner Müller

About the Author

Rolf Dieter Brinkmann was born in Vechta, Germany, in 1940, in the midst of World War II, and died in 1975, in London, England, after being struck by a hit-and-run driver. During his lifetime, Brinkmann published nine poetry collections, four short story collections, several radio plays, and a highly acclaimed novel. He also edited and translated two important German-language anthologies of contemporary American poetry (primarily Beat and New York School, for which Brinkmann had a particular affinity), and translated Frank O’Hara’s Lunch Poems into German, as well as a collection of poems by Ted Berrigan, entitled Guillaume Apollinaire ist Tot. In May, 1975, just a few weeks after his death, Brinkmann’s seminal, parameter-expanding poetry collection Westwärts 1 & 2 appeared, which was posthumously awarded the prestigious Petrarca Prize.

About the Translator

Mark Terrill shipped out of San Francisco as a merchant seaman to the Far East and beyond, studied and spent time with Paul Bowles in Tangier, Morocco, and has lived in Germany since 1984, where he’s worked as a shipyard welder, road manager for rock bands, cook and postal worker. His poems, prose, memoirs, criticism and translations have appeared in over 500 literary journals and anthologies worldwide, a dozen chapbooks, several broadsides and three full-length collections, including Kid with Gray Eyes (Cedar Hill Books) and Bread & Fish (The Figures). He recently guest-edited a special German Poetry issue of the Atlanta Review, which includes his translations of Günter Grass, Peter Handke, Nicolas Born and many others. Other collections of his translations have been published by Longhouse and Toad Press. Currently he lives on the grounds of a former shipyard near Hamburg with his wife and a large brood of cats.

Preview

Mark Terrill's Introduction and two poems from the collection, "Letter to Humphrey Bogart, Already Far Away" and "Artificial Light":

Excerpts from An Unchanging Blue: Selected Poems 1962-1975 by Rolf Dieter Brinkmann

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Price: $18.00

Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing Writing for a Socially Just Future

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-773-0

Asao B. Inoue

Perspectives on Writing
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Rich Rice

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-773-0 (paperback; $40) 978-1-60235-774-7 (PDF; $20) © 2015 by Asao B. Inoue. 345 pages with notes and bibliography. The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press. PDF and ePub available at http://wac.colostate.edu/books/inoue/

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Reviews

Description

In Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies, Asao B. Inoue theorizes classroom writing assessment as a complex system that is "more than" its interconnected elements. To explain how and why antiracist work in the writing classroom is vital to literacy learning, Inoue incorporates ideas about the white racial habitus that informs dominant discourses in the academy and other contexts. Inoue helps teachers understand the unintended racism that often occurs when teachers do not have explicit antiracist agendas in their assessments. Drawing on his own teaching and classroom inquiry, Inoue offers a heuristic for developing and critiquing writing assessment ecologies that explores seven elements of any writing assessment ecology: power, parts, purposes, people, processes, products, and places.

About the Author

Asao B. Inoue is Director of University Writing and Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington Tacoma. He has published on writing assessment, validity, and composition pedagogy in Assessing Writing, The Journal of Writing Assessment, Composition Forum, and Research in the Teaching of English, among other journals and collections. His co-edited collection Race and Writing Assessment (2012) won the CCCC's Outstanding Book Award for an edited collection.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Writing Assessment Ecologies as Antiracist Projects
Chapter 1: The Function of Race in Writing Assessments
Chapter 2: Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies
Chapter 3: The Elements of an Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecology
Chapter 4: Approaching Antiracist Work in an Assessment Ecology
Chapter 5: Designing Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies
Notes
References
Appendix A: English 160W's Grading Contract
Appendix B: Example Problem Posing Labor Process

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Price: $40.00

Arcadia

$50.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-858-4

Sir Philip Sidney

A Restoration in Contemporary English of the Complete 1593 Edition of The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia by Charles Stanley Ross and Joel B. Davis, with an Essay on Musical Settings for the Poems by Edward Abe Plough

Renaissance and Medieval Studies
Edited by Charles Stanley Ross

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-858-4 (paperback, $50); 978-1-60235-859-1 (hardcover $100); 978-1-60235-860-7 (PDF on CD, $30) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 640 pages with 25 illustrations, notes, and bibliography, and appendices

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What People Are Saying

"Ross and Davis have undertaken a daring venture: to "restore," as they put it, the immense masterpiece of English Renaissance prose, Sidney's Arcadia. Why, one might ask, should Sidney's baroque syntax be made simpler and his archaic diction modernized? Because their complexity and unfamiliarity, after the lapse of some 400 years, has made the work all but unreadable, except by a small and steadily shrinking cohort of scholars. The choice is either pious oblivion or the kind of creative updating we routinely welcome in contemporary productions of Shakespeare. Ross and Davis want to give a new generation of readers access to a literary achievement of surpassing intelligence and beauty."—Stephen Greenblatt, Cogan Professor of English, Harvard University

"Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia perfectly defines what we think of as the English Renaissance. By the sheer quality of its achievement, it created the illusion of separating traditional rhetoric from literature or polite letters. Emerging out of the small coterie around Sidney's sister Mary, the countess of Pembroke, Sidney's oeuvre reached Shakespeare, who took to new heights the oratory exhibited by the Arcadia's characters in their speeches, debates, and poetry. Sidney's masterpiecerichly deserves the renewed attention of everyone interested in the history of English moral philosophy and the language arts." —Krista Ratcliffe, Past President, Rhetoric Society of America, Arizona State University

"Most of us don't think of singing Renaissance shepherds as a source of political understanding.  But statesmanship is exactly what we find in Sidney's Arcadia.  It is one reason, along with Sidney's use of humor and suspense, that this compelling story was the most popular work of English narrative prose for over two hundred years.  Modern-day public servants might benefit as Shakespeare did in borrowing widely from Arcadia's lessons on virtue, popular rebellion and the perils of misrule." —Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr., President of Purdue University and Former Governor of Indiana

Description

Sidney's Arcadia was the most popular and most important work of English prose fiction for over two hundred years. In it we find the name Pamela, Sidney's invention. Shakespeare read every word. Not himself in the corridors of power as Sidney was, Shakespeare borrowed the way Sidney's prose and poetry expresses strong emotion controlled by thought. He also modeled characters on those in the Arcadia. Gloucester in King Lear is modeled on Sidney's blind Paphlagonian king. Philoclea's bewilderment at her love for Pyrocles becomes Juliet's performance when Romeo appears beneath her balcony.

Sidney's Renaissance romance also offers a surprisingly astute analysis of statesmanship that prefigures Shakespeare's history plays. When Basilius misinterprets an oracle and retreats to his country house, he pursues a cross-dressed Amazon whom his wife also desires. Musidorus and Pyrocles in disguise woo the royal princess Pamela and Philoclea by recounting their attempts to bring justice and stability to foreign countries. The king's envious sister-in-law stirs up dissensions and adds to the misery of her love-sick son Amphialus. Sidney himself was a courtier and close observer of Queen Elizabeth I. His father was three times governor of Ireland. Readers will find this fable of power, erotic passion, and civic unrest both entertaining and timely.

Contents

Preface
Some Common Names
Introduction by Charles Stanley Ross and Joel B. Davis
A Note on This Edition
Select Bibliography and Biography
Maps
The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia
Book 1
Book 2
Book 3
Book 4
Book 5
Adapting Arcadia's Poems to Music by Edward Plough
Family Tree
Pronunciation Guide to Proper Names
About the Editors
Note on Typography and Illustrations
Index of First Lines of Poems

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Attitudes: Selected Prose and Poetry

$20.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-150-9

W. Ross Winterowd

Attitudes coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-150-9 (paperback, $20.00; £15; €16  $24 AUD; $22 CAD); © 2010 by Parlor Press. 285 pages.

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978-1-60235-151-6 (Adobe eBook, $14.00; £11; €12  $17 AUD; $16 CAD)

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Description

At times Winterowd is playful, and at other times he's the mordantly cynical critic--of the academy, of academicians, and of society in general.  His attitudes are leavened by wit, and his insights are never mundane.  Attitudes is for anyone who has become jaded by the gray monotone of much writing in our profession. Attitudes includes essays, poems, and a novella, Academy Awards. All are published here for the first time.

About the Author

W. Ross Winterowd is the Bruce R. McElderry Professor Emeritus, University of Southern California, where he founded its PhD program in Rhetoric, Linguistics, and Literature. He has authored, coauthored, or edited many essays, reviews, poems, and books, including Searching For Faith: A Skeptic’s Journey (2004, Parlor Press), Senior Citizens Writing (2007, Parlor Press), The Culture and Politics of Literacy (1989, Oxford), and The English Department: An Institutional and Personal History (1998, Southern Illinois). He has been leading writing workshops for seniors in Huntington Beach, California, since 1997. In 2010, he received the field’s highest honor, the Exemplar Award, from the Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Contents

Part I.  Bricolage

“Chicken” and Poetry: The Unspeakable and the Unsayable
Insomniac Rhapsody on Vitalism
Writing Theorists Writing: Life Studies
The Seasons: Four Prose Lyrics
Tropical Thoughts
The Orgone Experience; or, Renewal Is Possible
The Ceremony of Innocence 29

II.  Poems

Parsnip, Carrot, Beet, Radish, Rutabaga, Jicama, Potato, Sweet Potato, Pea, Bean I, Bean II, Oats, Wheat, Rye, Rice, Sotweed, Lettuce, Cabbage, Okra,

Matters Professional

Deconstructionism
The Jaded Compositionist Meditates on His Calling During an Attack of Influenza
Slither, Bustle, Waddle, and Glide, Members of the Departmental Subcommittee on Allocation of Office Supplies and Faculty Amenities
Meditation at a Scholarly Conference

Erotica

Hiking Wheeler
Eudora (on having read One Writer’s Beginnings, by another Eudora)
The Deep Structure of Desire

Matters Personal

Lenses
With George and Mary
Code Blue
Les Fleurs Sauvages
Mellow Drama
“But a good cigar is a smoke”
How to Read a Page

III.  Academy Awards

About the Author

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Augmented Reality: Innovative Perspectives across Art, Industry, and Academia

$50.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-556-9

Edited by Sean Morey and John Tinnell

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-556-9 (paperback, $50) 978-1-60235-557-6 (hardcover, $100) 978-1-60235-558-3 (PDF, $25) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 367 pages in color, with 46 augmented reality illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Augmented Reality: Innovative Perspectives across Art, Industry, and Academia offers a wide-ranging exploration of the implications, challenges, and promises of augmented reality. Traditionally only covered from a technical perspective, augmented reality has become an increasingly important area of cultural inquiry in humanities scholarship and popular media outlets. This collection attempts to cross-pollinate the discourse, creating a multidisciplinary exchange among leading researchers and professionals who each advance different ways of understanding current (and future) forms of augmented reality. Another underlying mission is to bring critical reflection and artistic ingenuity into conversation with design thinking and software development. To that end, the collection features a mix of essays from humanities scholars, artworks by pathbreaking artists, as well as interviews with software developers and industry consultants. Among the first of its kind, the book also incorporates augmented reality into its own design by placing relevant digital content within the printed page using Aurasma.

What People Are Saying

The interviews and the presentation of artworks provide a nice counterpoint to the scholarly articles. The interviews include important figures from the commercial world of AR (e.g. , Maarten Lens-Fitzgerald and Jay Wright) and the academic community (Blair MacIntyre): the heterogeneity of perspectives from business, computer science and the humanities is valuable. The art selected includes some of the best known of the admittedly nascent field of AR art, including the work of Tamiko Thiel and B.C. Biermann. . . .  In sum, this volume does an excellent job of enlarging the space of discourse for Augmented Reality, illustrating the contribution that humanistic and artistic approaches can make to assessing the significance of a new media technology.  I would definitely consider using this collection in various graduate or upper-level undergraduate classes that we teach here at Georgia Tech. —Jay David Bolter, Wesley Chair of New Media and Co-Director of the Augmented Environments Lab (AEL), Georgia Institute of Technology

Contributors

Scot Barnett, BC Biermann, Sidney I. Dobrin, Jason Farman, John Craig Freeman, Jordan Frith, Jason Helms, Steve Holmes, Jason Kalin, Bryan Leister, Maarten Lens-Fitzgerald, Conor McGarrigle, Sean Morey, Blair MacIntyre, Brett Oppegaard, Isabel Pedersen, Christine Perey, Mark Skwarek, Tamiko Thiel, John Tinnell, Douglas Trueman, Joseph P. Weakland, and Jay Wright

About the Editors

Sean Morey is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville where he teaches writing and digital media. He is the author of Rhetorical Delivery and Digital Technologies: Networks, Affect, Electracy (Routledge, 2016), The New Media Writer (Fountainhead, 2014), and  co-edited the collection Ecosee: Image, Rhetoric, Nature (SUNY Press, 2009).

John Tinnell is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Colorado Denver. His forthcoming book, Actionable Media (Oxford UP, 2017), theorizes a new wave of digital communication emerging in the wake of ubiquitous computing.

Contents

How to Use This Book
Acknowledgments

1 Introduction: A Medium in the Making
Sean Morey and John Tinnell

Part 1: Scholarly Articles
2 Designing, Arranging, and Assessing Augmented Places through Mobile Media Alignment
Brett Oppegaard

3 Potential Panels: Toward a Theory of Augmented Comics
Jason Helms

4 "Sergey Brin Is Batman": Google Glass and the Rhetoric of Adoption in Popular Networked Culture    
Isabel Pedersen and Douglas Trueman

5 Life through the Screen: Location-Based Information and the Personalization of Space
Jordan Frith

6 "Augpunk": Imagining Alternative Futures for Augmented Reality through Science Fiction
Joseph P. Weakland

7 Gathering Memories with Augmented Reality
Jason Kalin

8 The Dream Deferred: Augmented Reality as Rhetorical Realism
Scot Barnett

9 SAZoo-AR, Ethea, and Computer Vision
Steve Holmes

10 When Geolocation Meets Visualization
Jason Farman

Part 2: Interviews
Interview 1: Sidney I. Dobrin
Interview 2: Blair MacIntyre
Interview 3: Christine Perey
Interview 4: Jay Wright
Interview 5: Maarten Lens-Fitzgerald           
Interview 6: BC Biermann

Part 3: Artwork

BC Biermann
Augmented Architecture [NYC + LA, 2012]
Bowery Wall [NYC, 2012]
Wynwood Walls @ Art Basel [Miami, 2012]

Tamiko Thiel
Shades of Absence [Venice, Istanbul, Brooklyn, Los Angeles, 2011]
Clouding Green [Singapore, 2012-2013]
Reign of Gold [NYC, Berlin, Los Angeles, Sydney, Tampa, 2012]
Jasmine Rain (Birdcage) [Cairo, Tunis, Beijing, Boston, NYC, 2011]
Carnation Rain [Lisbon, 2011] 

Conor McGarrigle
NAMAland [Dublin, 2010-2012]
Walking Stories [Dundrum, 2011]
Vineland [2013]
Where's Franco? [VENICE, 2011]

John Craig Freeman
Orators, Rostrums, and Propaganda Stands [2012-2013]
Flotsam & Jetsam [Singapore, Massachusetts, 2013]
EEG AR: Things We Have Lost [Liverpool, 2013]
Border Memorial: Frontera De Los Muertos [Arizona, 2012]
Water wARs [Venice Biennial and Brooklyn, 2011]
Tiananmen SquARed (Attributed to) 4 Gentlemen [Beijing, 2010]
Peace Doors [Belfast, 2010]

Bryan Leister
Goldman Sachs (Giant Blood Sucking Vampire Squid) [Denver, 2012]
Mood Analyticator [Denver, 2012]

Mark Skwarek
#arOCCUPYWALLSTREET [NYC, 2011]          
The Bottomless Pit [Zero1 Biennial, 2012]
erasAR [USA, 2010]

Notes
Bibliography
Contributors
Index

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Avatar Emergency

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-289-6

Gregory L. Ulmer

New Media Theory
Series Editor, Byron Hawk

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-289-6 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-290-2 (hardcover, $65); 978-1-60235-291-9 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20) © 2012 by Parlor Press. 326 pages, with notes, illustrations, bibliography, and index.

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Description

A new experience of identity is emerging within the digital apparatus under the rubric of “avatar.” This study develops “concept avatar” as an opportunity to invent a practice of citizenship native to the Internet that simulates the functionality of measure dramatized in the traditions of “descent” (“avatar”) or “incarnation,” including the original usage in the Bhagavad Gita, and the Western evolution of the virtue of prudence from the Ancient daimon, through genius and character, to the contemporary sinthome.

What people are saying . . .

Avatar Emergency is Gregory L. Ulmer's fourth book featuring the EmerAgency, an online virtual consultancy for the digital age. This time his point of departure is Paul Virilio's Generalized Accident from which he develops and theorizes the new concepts of Flash Reason, and specifically Avatar, which serves as the site for electrate identity formation in the twenty-first century. I have taught Ulmer's work on electracy for years, and his theoretical sophistication as well as the practical ambition and applicability of his work never ceases to amaze me. With Avatar Emergency, Ulmer shows once again that he is at the top of his game; I am positively thrilled to share this new and very timely treasure trove of a book with my students. —Jan Rune Holmevik, author of Inter/Vention: Free Play in the Age of Electracy

Ulmer advances a ratio: "Avatar is to electracy what 'self' is to literacy, or 'spirit' to orality." He explores this "emergent logic through the invention of concept avatar." He begins, urgently, by asking: "What might wisdom be today, upon what authority might it be grounded, . . . what vision of well-being?" Perpetually asking the questions, Ulmer searches for "a vital anecdote" as an antidote to the "internet accident" by way of "flash reason." He claims, "Within this frame I present, in the genre of Mystory [Internet Invention], what I have come to understand about living, my decision to become a professor of the Humanities and the lifestyle embraced as part of that choice." He invites his readers, thereby, to discover their own Mystory (mystery). Their own wisdom. After all, he explains: "Concept avatar must be not only understood, but undergone." My advice: Undergo the book! —Victor J. Vitanza, author of Negation, Subjectivity, and the History of Rhetoric and Sexual Violence in Western Thought and Writing: Chaste Rape

About the Author

Gregory L. Ulmer is Professor of English and Media Studies at the University of Florida, where he teaches courses in Hypermedia, E-Lit, and Heuretics.  He is also the Joseph Bueys Chair in the European Graduate School, Saas-Fee, Switzerland. Ulmer’s books include Applied Grammatology (1985), Teletheory (1989), Heuretics (1994), Internet Invention (2003),  Electronic Monuments (2005), and Miami Virtue (2011).

Contents

Preface
1. Prudence
2. Concept
3. Joke
4. Descent
5. Moment
6. Memory
7. Measure
8. Enjoyment
9. Letter
10. Frog
11. Hegemony
12. Counsel
13. Wisdom
Afterword: Class Portrait With Daimon (A Remix)
Works Cited

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Basic Writing

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-174-5

George Otte and Rebecca Williams Mlynarczyk

Basic Writing coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-174-5 (paperback, $30.00; £21; $32 CAD; €24; $35 AUD); © 2010 by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse. 247 pages, with notes, glossary, bibliography, and index.

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-175-2 (hardcover, $60.00; £42; $64 CAD; €48; $70 AUD); 978-1-60235-176-9 (Adobe eBook; $16.00; £12; $18 CAD; €13; $19 AUD); also available at the WAC Clearinghouse: http://wac.colostate.edu/

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Description

Framed by historic developments—from the Open Admissions movement of the 1960s and 1970s to the attacks on remediation that intensified in the 1990s and beyond—Basic Writing traces the arc of these large social and cultural forces as they have shaped and reshaped the field. George Otte and Rebecca Williams Mlynarczyk balance fidelity to the past with present relevance, local concerns with (presumptively) global knowledge, personal judgment with (apparent) objectivity. Basic Writing circles back on the same general story, looking for different themes or seeing the same themes from different perspectives. What emerges is a gestalt of Basic Writing that will give readers interested in its history, self-definition, pedagogy, or research a sense of the important trends and patterns. Otte and Mlynarczyk make research trajectories clear without oversimplifying them or denying  the undeniable blurring, dissensus, and differential development that characterizes the field.Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition Logo

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Charles Bazerman
Published jointly by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse

About the Authors

George Otte is a member of the doctoral faculty at the CUNY Graduate Center in the PhD Programs in English, Urban Education, and Interactive Technology and Pedagogy. He served as coeditor of the Journal of Basic Writing from 1996 to 2002. He is the coauthor with Nondita Mason of Writers’ Roles: Enactments of the Process (Harcourt, 1994) and, with Linda Palumbo, of Casts of Thought: Writing In and Against Tradition (Macmillan, 1990).

Rebecca Williams Mlynarczyk has taught basic writing at the City University of New York since 1974. She is currently professor of English at the CUNY Graduate Center and Kingsborough Community College, where she codirects the ESL program. She is the author of Conversations of the Mind: The Uses of Journal Writing for Second-Language Learners (Erlbaum) and the coauthor, with Steven Haber, of In Our Own Words: Student Writers at Work (Cambridge). She has served as coeditor of the Journal of Basic Writing since 2003.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Series Editor’s Preface, Charles Bazerman

Introduction
1 Historical Overview
2 Defining Basic Writing and Basic Writers
3 Practices and Pedagogies
4 Research
5 The Future of Basic Writing

Appendix: Basic Writing Resources
Works Cited
Index
About the Authors

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Best of the Independent Journals in Rhetoric and Composition 2012

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-495-1

Edited by Julia Voss, Beverly Moss, Steve Parks, Brian Bailie, Heather Christiansen, and Stephanie Ceraso

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-495-1 (Paperback; $32); 978-1-60235-496-8 (Adobe eBook; $20). 320 pages with illustrations, notes, and bibliographies. © 2014 by Parlor Press. Individual essays in this book have been reprinted with permission of the respective copyright owners.

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Description

The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2012 represents the result of a nationwide conversation—beginning with journal editors, but expanding to teachers, scholars and workers across the discipline of Rhetoric and Composition—to select essays that showcase the innovative and transformative work now being published in the field’s independent journals. Representing both print and digital journals in the field, the essays featured here explore issues ranging from classroom practice to writing in global and digital contexts, from writing workshops to community activism. Together, the essays provide readers with a rich understanding of the present and future direction of the field.

In addition to the introduction by Julia Voss and Beverly Moss, the anthology features work by the following authors and representing these journals: Jamie White-Farnham (Community Literacy Journal), Noah R. Roderick (Composition Forum), Kate Pantelides and Mariaelena Bartesaghi (Composition Studies), Heidi A. McKee (Computers and Composition), Rex Veeder (Enculturation), Matthew Pavesich (Journal of Basic Writing), Kelly S. Bradbury (The Journal of Teaching Writing), Derek N. Mueller (Kairos), Richard H. Thames (KB Journal), Jeanne Marie Rose (Pedagogy), and Melvette Melvin Davis (Reflections).

About the Editors

Steve Parks is Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University. He is the author of Class Politics: The Movement for a Students’ Right To Their Own Language 2e (Parlor Press, 2013) and Gravyland: Writing Beyond the Curriculum in the City of Brotherly Love. With Paula Mathieu and Tiffany Rousculp, he co-edited Circulating Communities: The Tactics and Strategies of Community Publishing. Working with Samantha Blackmon and Cristina Kirklighter, he has co-edited Listening to our Elders: Writing and Working for Change, a research project supported by NCTE. He has also published in College English, Journal of College Composition and Communication, and Community Literacy Journal. Over the past ten years, he has directed New City Community Press (newcitypress.com).

Brian Bailie is a PhD candidate in the Composition and Cultural Rhetoric program at Syracuse University. His work focuses on the intersections of protest and media, technology and transnationalism, identity and material rhetoric, and the ways activists exploit, expand, resist, and utilize these intersections to their advantage. Bailie has served as contributor, associate editor, and special issue editor for Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service-Learning, and Community Literacy. His most recent publications have appeared in the KB Journal and Composition Forum.

Heather Christiansen is a PhD student in the Rhetoric, Communication and Information Design program at Clemson University. Her research interests include visual rhetoric, the rhetoric of branding, identity, user experience design, consumer behavior and social influence. She currently serves as the managing editor for The WAC Journal.

Beverly J. Moss is an associate professor of English at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio.  Her scholarly interests focus on literacy in African American community spaces and in composition theory and pedagogy.  Her publications include Everyone’s an Author (co-authored with Andrea Lunsford, Lisa Ede, Carole Clark Papper, and Keith Walters), A Community Text Arises: A Literate Text and A Literacy Tradition in African American Churches, Literacies across Communities (edited collection), and Writing Groups Inside and Outside the Classroom (co-edited with Nels Highberg and Melissa Nicolas).

Stephanie Ceraso received her PhD in English from the University of Pittsburgh, specializing in rhetoric and composition, pedagogy, sound and listening, and digital media. She currently teaches at Georgetown University but will be joining the faculty at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in Fall 2014. You can find more about her research, projects, and teaching at www.stephceraso.com.

Julia Voss is an assistant professor in the Department of English at Santa Clara University. She teaches classes in college writing and digital composing and studies studies composition and literacy using qualitative methodologies and multimodal presentation formats. Her current projects focus on strategies for teaching digital composing in a constantly-evolving literacy ecology and on the writing practices and pedagogies occurring in different spaces across college campuses.

Contents

Introduction
Steve Parks, Beverly Moss, Julia Voss, Brian Bailie, Heather Christiansen, and Stephanie Ceraso

Community Literacy Journal
1 Rhetorical Recipes: Women’s Literacies In and Out of the Kitchen
Jamie White-Farnham

Composition Forum
2 Analogize This! The Politics of Scale and the Problem of Substance in Complexity-Based Composition
Noah R. Roderick

Composition Studies
3 “So what are we working on?” Pronouns as a Way of Re-Examining Composing
Kate Pantelides and Mariaelena Bartesaghi

Computers and Composition
4 Policy Matters Now and in the Future: Net Neutrality, Corporate Data Mining, and Government Surveillance
Heidi A. McKee

Enculturation
5 Re-reading Marshall McLuhan: Hectic Zen, Rhetoric, and Composition
Rex Veeder

Journal of Basic Writing
6 Reflecting on the Liberal Reflex: Rhetoric and the Politics of Acknowledgment in Basic Writing
Matthew Pavesich

The Journal of Teaching Writing
7 Positioning The Textbook As Contestable Intellectual Space
Kelly S. Bradbury

Kairos
8 Views from a Distance: A Nephological Model of the CCCC Chairs’ Addresses, 1977-2011
Derek N. Mueller

KB Journal
9 The Meaning of the Motivorum’s Motto: “Ad bellum purificandum” to “Tendebantque manus ripae ulterioris amore
Richard H. Thames

Pedagogy
10 Writing Time: Composing in an Accelerated World
Jeanne Marie Rose

Reflections
11 Daughters Making Sense of African American Young Adult Literature in Out-of-School Zones
Melvette Melvin Davis

About the Editors

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Best of the Independent Journals in Rhetoric and Composition 2013

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-642-9

Edited by Steve Parks, Brian Bailie, Heather Christiansen, Elisabeth Miller, and Morris Young

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-642-9 (Paperback; $34); 978-1-60235-643-6 (Adobe eBook; $20). 418 pages with illustrations, notes, and bibliographies. © 2015 by Parlor Press. Individual essays in this book have been reprinted with permission of the respective copyright owners.

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Bookstores: Order by fax, mail, or phone. See our "Sales and Ordering Page" for details.


Description

The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2013 represents the result of a nationwide conversation—beginning with journal editors, but expanding to teachers, scholars and workers across the discipline of Rhetoric and Composition—to select essays that showcase the innovative and transformative work now being published in the field's independent journals. Representing both print and digital journals in the field, the essays featured here explore issues ranging from classroom practice to writing in global and digital contexts, from writing workshops to community activism. Together, the essays provide readers with a rich understanding of the present and future direction of the field.

The anthology features work by the following authors and representing these journals: Mya Poe (Across the Disciplines), Michelle Hall Kells (Community Literacy Journal), Liane Robertson, Kara Taczak, and Kathleen Blake Yancey (Composition Forum), Paula Rosinski and Tim Peeples (Composition Studies), Mark Sample, Annette Vee, David M Rieder, Alexandria Lockett, Karl Stolley, and Elizabeth Losh (Enculturation), Andrew Vogel (Harlot), Steve Lamos (Journal of Basic Writing), Steve Sherwood (Journal of Teaching Writing), Scott Nelson et al. (Kairos), Kate Vieira (Literacy in Composition Studies), Heidi Estrem and E. Shelley Reid (Pedagogy), Rochelle Gregory (Present Tense), Grace Wetzel and "Wes" (Reflections), Eliot Rendleman (The Writing Lab Newsletter), and Rebecca Jones and Heather Palmer (Writing on the Edge).

Contents

Introduction
Elisabeth Miller and Morris Young

Across the Disciplines
1 Re-Framing Race in Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum
Mya Poe

Community Literacy Journal
2 What’s Writing Got to Do with It?: Citizen Wisdom, Civil Rights Activism, and 21st Century Community Literacy
Michelle Hall Kells

Composition Forum
3 Notes Toward A Theory of Prior Knowledge and Its Role In College Composers’ Transfer of Knowledge and Practice
Liane Robertson, Kara Taczak and Kathleen Blake Yancey

Composition Studies
4 Forging Rhetorical Subjects: Problem Based Learning in the Writing Classroom
Paula Rosinski and Tim Peeples

Enculturation
5 The Role of Computational Literacy in Computers and Writing
Mark Sample and Annette Vee

Programming Is the New Ground of Writing
David M. Rieder

Coding Values
Annette Vee

Five BASIC Statements on Computational Literacy
Mark Sample

I am Not a Computer Programmer
Alexandria Lockett

Source Literacy: A Vision of Craft
Karl Stolley

The Anxiety of Programming: Why Teachers Should Relax and Administrators Should Worry
Elizabeth Losh

Harlot
6 Recitative: The Persuasive Tenor of Jazz Culture in Langston Hughes, Billy Strayhorn, and John Coltrane
Andrew Vogel

Journal of Basic Writing
7 Minority-Serving Institutions, Race-Conscious “Dwelling,” and Possible Futures for Basic Writing at Predominantly White Institutions
Steve Lamos

Journal of Teaching Writing
8 Humor and the Rhetorical Proprieties in the Writing Classroom
Steve Sherwood

Kairos
9 Crossing Battle Lines: Teaching Multimodal Literacies through Alternate Reality Games
Scott Nelson, Chris Ortiz y Prentice, M. Catherine Coleman, Eric Detweiler, Marjorie Foley, Kendall Gerdes, Cleve Wiese, R. Scott Garbacz, and Matt King

Literacy in Composition Studies
10 On the Social Consequences of Literacy
Kate Vieira

Pedagogy
11 What New Writing Teachers Talk about When They Talk about Teaching
Heidi Estrem and E. Shelley Reid

Present Tense
12 A Womb With a View: Identifying the Culturally Iconic Fetal Image in Prenatal Ultrasound Provisions
Rochelle Gregory

Reflections
13 Prison Collaborative Writing: Building Strong Mutuality in Community-Based Learning
Grace Wetzel and “Wes”

The Writing Lab Newsletter
14 Lexicography: Self-Analysis and Defining the Keywords of our Missions
Eliot Rendleman

Writing on the Edge
15 Counter-Coulter: A Story of Craft and Ethos
Rebecca Jones and Heather Palmer

About the Editors

Steve Parks is associate professor of writing and rhetoric at Syracuse University where he teaches entry-level and advanced courses in composition theory and practice. He has published two books: Gravyland: Writing Beyond the Curriculum in the City of Brotherly Love (Syracuse University Press 2010) and Class Politics: The Students' Right to Their Own Language (Parlor Press 2013). He has also published articles in Journal of College Composition and Communication, College English, Community Literacy Journal, and Reflections. He established New City Community Press (newcitycommunitypress.com) in Philadelphia as well as Gifford Street Community Press (giffordstreetcommunitypress.com) in Syracuse. Over the past two years, he has been working with democratic activists in the Middle East and North Africa.

Brian Bailie is a PhD candidate in the Composition and Cultural Rhetoric program at Syracuse University. His work focuses on the intersections of protest and media, technology and transnationalism, identity and material rhetoric, and the ways activists exploit, expand, resist, and utilize these intersections to their advantage. Bailie has served as contributor, associate editor, and special issue editor for Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service-Learning, and Community Literacy. His most recent publications have appeared in the KB Journal  and Composition Forum.

Heather Christiansen is a PhD student in the Rhetoric, Communication and Information Design program at Clemson University. Her research interests include visual rhetoric, the rhetoric of brand communities, identity, and user experience design. She currently serves as the managing editor of The WAC Journal.

Elisabeth Miller is a PhD candidate in Composition and Rhetoric at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. She is currently completing a dissertation, Literacy beyond Language, on the literate practices of persons with aphasia, or language-related disability caused by stroke or other brain injury. She has taught introductory and intermediate writing, served as Assistant Director of Writing Across the Curriculum at UW-Madison, and acted as coordinator for the Madison Writing Assistance community writing program. Her work has appeared in Community Literacy Journal and Writing Lab Newsletter.

Morris Young is professor of English at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His book, Minor Re/Visions: Asian American Literacy Narratives as a Rhetoric of Citizenship (Southern Illinois UP, 2004) received the 2004 W. Ross Winterowd Award and the 2006 CCCC Outstanding Book Award. With LuMing Mao, he coedited Representations: Doing Asian American Rhetoric (Utah State UP, 2008), which received an honorable mention for the 2009 Mina P. Shaughnessy Prize from MLA. He is currently working on a project that examines the conceptual and material spaces of Asian American rhetoric.

About the Editors

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Best of the Independent Journals in Rhetoric and Composition 2014

$33.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-823-2

Edited by Steve Parks, Brian Bailie, James Seitz, Jessica Pauszek, Tamara Bassam Issak, and Heather Christiansen

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-823-2 (paperback, $33); 978-1-60235-824-9 (Adobe eBook, $20). 268 pages with illustrations, notes, and bibliographies. © 2016 by Parlor Press. Individual essays in this book have been reprinted with permission of the respective copyright owners.

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Description

The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2014 represents the result of a nationwide conversation—beginning with journal editors, but expanding to teachers, scholars and workers across the discipline of Rhetoric and Composition—to select essays that showcase the innovative and transformative work now being published in the field's independent journals. Representing both print and digital journals in the field, the essays featured here explore issues ranging from classroom practice to writing in global and digital contexts, from writing workshops to community activism. Together, the essays provide readers with a rich understanding of the present and future direction of the field.

The anthology features work by the following authors and representing these journals: Adela Licona and J. Sarah Gonzalez (Community Literacy Journal) Hillery Glasby (Harlot), Victor Villanueva (Journal of Basic Writing), Kathleen Cassity (Journal of Teaching Writing), Fred Johnson (Kairos), Annette Vee (Literacy in Composition Studies), Kurt Spellmeyer (Pedagogy), David Rieder (Present Tense), Kendall Leon (Reflections), and Noreen Lape (The Writing Lab Newsletter).

Contents

Introduction
James Seitz and Jessica Pauszek
Community Literacy Journal
1 Education/Connection/Action: Community Literacies and Shared Knowledges as Creative Productions for Social Justice
Adela C. Licona and J. Sarah Gonzalez
Harlot
2 "Let Me Queer My Throat" Queer Rhetorics of Negotiation: Marriage Equality and Homonormativity
Hillery Glasby
Journal of Basic Writing
3 Subversive Complicity and Basic Writing Across the Curriculum
Victor Villanueva
Journal of Teaching Writing
4 Practice, Patience, and Process in the Age of Accountability: What Cognitive Psychology Suggests about the Teaching and Assessment of Writing
Kathleen J. Cassity
Kairos
5 Perspicuous Objects: Reading Comics and Writing Instruction
Fred Johnson
Literacy in Composition Studies
6 Understanding Computer Programming as a Literacy
Annette Vee
Pedagogy
7 Fighting Words: Instrumentalism, Pragmatism, and the Necessity of Politics in Composition
Kurt Spellmeyer
Present Tense
8 From GUI to NUI: Microsoft's Kinect and the Politics of the (Body as) Interface
David M. Rieder
Reflections
9 Chicanas Making Change: Institutional Rhetoric and the ComisiÓn Femenil Mexicana Nacional
Kendall Leon
The Writing Lab Newsletter
10 Going Global, Becoming Translingual: The Development of a Multilingual Writing Center
Noreen G. Lape

About the Editors

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Beyond Argument: Essaying as a Practice of (Ex)Change

$24.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-646-7

Sarah Allen

Perspectives on Writing
Series Editor, Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-646-7 (paperback, $24); 978-1-60235-650-4 (hardcover, $50); 978-1-60235-647-4 (PDF, $16) © 2015 by Sarah Allen. 157 pages with notes and bibliography.

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Description

Beyond Argument: Essaying as a Practice of (Ex)Change offers an in-depth examination of how current ways of thinking about the writer-page relation in personal essays can be reconceived according to practices in the "care of the self" — an ethic by which writers such as Seneca, Montaigne, and Nietzsche lived. This approach promises to revitalize the form and address many of the concerns expressed by essay scholars and writers regarding the lack of rigorous exploration we see in our students' personal essays — and sometimes, even, in our own. In pursuing this approach, Sarah Allen presents a version of subjectivity that enables productive debate in the essay, among essays, and beyond.

About the Author

Sarah Allen is Associate Professor in the English Department at the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, CO, where she serves as a Rhetoric and Composition scholar and teacher. Her work has been published in Rhetoric Review and in Educational Philosophy and Theory; she also has book chapters in Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing (Parlor Press) and in Research Writing Revisited: A Sourcebook for Teachers (Heinemann). Her scholarship generally explores the ethics of the personal essay, and this work informs her teaching, as she works to discover the most useful and effective ways of assisting students in engaging with difficult, dense material and in generating complex, rigorous writings of their own.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 Meeting the Real Self in the Essay
2 Meeting the Constructed Self in the Essay
3 Cultivating a Self in the Essay
4 Imitation as Meditation
5 Self Writing in the Classroom
About the Author
Works Cited

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Beyond Dichotomy: Synergizing Writing Center and Classroom Pedagogies

$24.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-631-3

Steven J. Corbett

Perspectives on Writing
Series Editor, Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-631-3 (paperback, $24); 978-1-60235-659-7 (hardcover, $50); 978-1-60235-632-0 (PDF, $16) © 2015 by Steven J. Corbett. 159 pages with notes and bibliography.

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Description

How closely can or should writing centers and writing classrooms collaborate? Beyond Dichotomy explores how research on peer tutoring one-to-one and in small groups can inform our work with students in writing centers and other tutoring programs, as well as in writing courses and classrooms. These multi-method (including rhetorical and discourse analyses and ethnographic and case-study) investigations center on several course-based tutoring (CBT) partnerships at two universities. Rather than practice separately in the center or in the classroom, rather than seeing teacher here and tutor there and student over there, CBT asks all participants in the dynamic drama of teaching and learning to consider the many possible means of connecting synergistically.

About the Author

Steven J. Corbett is Assistant Professor of English at George Mason University. He is co-editor (with Michelle LaFrance and Teagan Decker) of the collection Peer Pressure, Peer Power: Theory and Practice in Peer Review and Response for the Writing Classroom (Fountainhead Press, 2014). His essays on teaching, writing, and rhetoric have appeared in The Writing Center Journal, Rhetoric Review, Pedagogy, Kairos, The Writing Lab Newsletter, Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, Inside Higher Ed, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and elsewhere.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Sharing Pedagogical Authority: Practice Complicates Theory When Synergizing Classroom, Small-Group, and One-to-One Writing Instruction
1 Tutoring Style, Tutoring Strategy: Course-Based Tutoring and the History, Rhetoric, and Reality of the Directive/Nondirective Instructional Continuum
2 Methods and Methodology: Locating Places, People, and Analytical Frames        
3 Macro- and Micro-Analyses of One-to-One Tutorials: Case Studies at the University of Washington
4 Conflict and Care while Tutoring in the Classroom: Case Studies at the University of Washington and Southern Connecticut State University
5 Conclusion: Toward Teacher/Student, Classroom/Center Hybrid Choices
Works Cited
Appendix
Index
About the Author

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Building a Community, Having a Home

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-926-0

A History of the Conference on College Composition and Communication Asian/Asian American Caucus

Edited by Jennifer Sano-Franchini, Terese Guinsatao Monberg, and K. Hyoejin Yoon

Working and Writing for Change (A Parlor Press Imprint)
Edited by Steve Parks, Cristina Kirklighter, and Jess Pauszek

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-926-0 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-927-7 (PDF on CD, $20). © 2017 by New City Community Press. 308 pages with 85 illustrations, notes, and bibliography.

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Building a Community, Having a Home: A History of the Conference on College Composition and Communication Asian/Asian American Caucus documents how Asian/Asian American teacher-scholars have emerged within and contributed to a number of areas in rhetoric and composition, as well as the National Council of Teachers of English and the Conference on College Composition and Communication in diverse and substantial ways from the 1960s to contemporary times. Contributors reflect on the spaces where the writing of history and the potential for community coalesce, ultimately demonstrating how a history that acknowledges the alliances, unexpected connections and coalitions, gaps, setbacks, and silences is necessary for sustaining a scholarly community that is persistently open to re/vision. Building a Community, Having a Home works toward these goals by including archival research and interviews with founding members alongside a bibliography of works in Asian/Asian American rhetoric and composition, and scholarly essays illustrating the contributions Asian/Asian American scholars have made to the history of rhetoric, world Englishes, writing program administration, and more. At the same time, the collection interweaves cross-generational perspectives and emerging work as a way of illustrating how institutional action, as well as the scholarly work of Asian/Asian American teacher-scholars has been circulated and carried forward over time.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Voices from the CCCC Asian/Asian American Caucus
Dominic Ashby, Holly Bruland, Karen Ching Carter, Stuart Ching, Jerry Won Lee, Peter Mayshle, Jolivette Mecenas, Iswari Pandey, Charlyne Sarmiento, Mira Shimabukuro, Hui Wu, Morris Young
The Stand
Lawson Fusao Inada
Introduction: Re/Articulations of History, Re/Visions of Community
Terese Guinsatao Monberg, K. Hyoejin Yoon, and Jennifer Sano-Franchini
1 Taking Time for Feminist Historiography: Remembering Asian/Asian American Institutional and Scholarly Activism
Jennifer Sano-Franchini
Circulation Essay: The Presence of Asian/Asian American Scholars in College Composition and Communication (1950–2010)
Phuong Minh Tran, with a foreword by K. Hyoejin Yoon
2 "To Establish a Home within a Home": An Interview with LuMing Mao
Chanon Adsanatham
3 "Developing Professional Relationships and Personal Friendships": An Interview with Morris Young
Robyn Tasaka
4 Fostering Our Efforts to "Write in the Spaces Left": Stories of Emergence in Asian American Rhetoric
Terese Guinsatao Monberg and Haivan V. Hoang
Circulation Essay: The Impact of Asian and Asian American Scholarship as a Productive, Contested Site
Linh Dich
A Collection of Images and Archival Documents
5 A Survey of Research in Asian Rhetoric Reflections on "A Survey of Research in Asian Rhetoric"
Bo Wang
Circulation Essay: Racial Identities, Visual Representations, and Performative Capacities: Rhetorical Production(s) of/by Asians/Asian Americans in Hawai'i
Scott Ka'alele, Edward Lee, and Michael Pak, with K. Hyoejin Yoon
6 Globalization and the Teaching of Written English Reflections on "Globalization and the Teaching of Written English"
Paul Kei Matsuda
7 What Does the Field of Writing Assessment Need? Or, How Asian and Asian American Rhetoric Can Help Writing Assessments Work Better
Asao B. Inoue
Circulation Essay: Building on Recent Research from AAAC Members to Advocate for Second Language International Students
Jolivette Mecenas
Circulation Essay: Risks and Affordances: The Naming of the Asian/Asian American Caucus
Lehua Ledbetter
Appendix A: Asian/Asian American Caucus, 2016
Appendix B: Timeline of Scholarship and Accomplishments
Appendix C: Bibliography of Asian/Asian American Rhetoric and Composition
Appendix D: Asian/Asian American Publications in College Composition and Communication (1950–2010)
Phuong Minh Tran
Contributors

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Camera Phone

$16.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-162-2

Brooke Biaz

Camera Phone coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-162-2 (paperback, $16.00; £11.00; €13.00; $18 AUS; $18 CAD); 978-1-60235-163-9 (Adobe eBook, $12.00; £8.00; €9.00; $13 AUS; $13 CAD). © 2010 by Parlor Press. 245 pages, with low-cost recipes and recommendations for futher reading.

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Preview Chapter 1, "Being There," in PDF format.

Camera Phone FlyerDownload the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format).

Description

"I crouch in Modern Film Classics while Karen, coming in from the backroom, and from the left, ten minutes after opening, makes some comment about some writer or another looking like Rene Russo. To which I call out: "Oh, right, who exactly?" I phone shoot her in medium shot with a wall of films by Scorsese behind her."

"On the seventh floor all is pretty quiet. The corridor is long, dog-legging at half way. A TV somewhere is playing what sounds like a repeat of 1980s cop show Hill Street Blues. I have no idea which episode, and, even though I've seen them all more than once, I can't seem to get interested in thinking about it. The low-pile carpeting is allowing me to glide effortlessly and silently over it, while not forgetting to shoot each one of the apartment doors so that the threatening notion that one of them could open at any minute and reveal . . ."

Camera Phone is a novel of cell phones and films—with some fabulous, low-cost recipes and recommendations for further reading. Let's face it, there's more than meets the eye when you're studying film at the University of Southport.

About the Author

Brooke Biaz (aka Graeme Harper) is a fiction writer, scriptwriter, and cultural critic. He is Editor-in-Chief of the international journal, New Writing. His awards include the National Book Council Award for New Fiction (Australia), among many others. He has been a Professor of Creative Writing at a number of universities, none of which are the University of Southport.  His most recent works of fiction include Moon Dance (Parlor Press, 2008) and Small Maps of the World (Parlor Press, 2006).

Contents

Part 1

1, Being There (Read Ch. 1 in PDF format)
2, Beauty and the Beast
3, Pulp Fiction

Part 2

1, Donnie Brasco
2, Godzilla
3, A Life Less Ordinary
4, Dark City
5, Groundhog Day

Other Parlor Press Books by Brooke Biaz

Small Maps of the World Moon Dance The Invention of Dying

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Canticle of the Night Path

$12.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-356-5

Jennifer Atkinson

Winner of the New Measure Poetry Prize
Judge: Susan Stewart

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-356-5 (paperback, $12); 978-1-60235-357-2 (ebook, $12). Available November 1, 2012. © 2013 by Parlor Press. 76 pages.

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The poems in Jennifer Atkinson’s Canticle of the Night Path, collected in alphabetical order from “Canticle of A” to “Canticle of Zed,” are little songs of five—five lines, five sentences, five couplets, or five paragraphs—canticles to, for, with, and of all sorts of things.  There are Canticles to Chipped Plates, to Dust, with Eyelashes, with Macaroons, of Rhymes, Rushes, Slippage, Stone, Shrapnel and Manna. Woven throughout the book, along with a series of Parables as if excerpted from her teachings, is the legendary figure of Mary Magdalene, as painted by Giotto and re-imagined as a teacher of embodied spiritual and intellectual practice.  Some canticles are lyric improvisations quick with rhyme, allusion, and wordplay.  Others are meditative investigations of darkness, pleasure, cruelty, or joy. All are acts of fierce attention to language, the musical possibilities of the lyric line, and the natural world, built and unbuilt.

With Canticle of the Night Path, Jennifer Atkinson sets in motion a deeply compelling sequence of praise songs. Whether their origins are remote in time or close to hand, the objects of her praise become intricately connected as each is illuminated in turn--by electric light, by candle-light, by lightning. She models a patient attention that gives way to sudden insights and the reader is transported by the clarity and music of her forms.
—Susan Stewart, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry and MacArthur Fellow

About the Author

Jennifer Atkinson is the author of four collections of poetry—The Dogwood Tree, The Drowned City, Drift Ice, and now Canticle of the Night Path, which recently won Free Verse’s 2012 New Measure Poetry Prize. Individual poems have appeared in various journals including Field, Image, Witness, New American Writing, and Cincinnati Review. She teaches in the English Department and the MFA program at George Mason University in Virginia.

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Chinese Rhetoric and Writing: An Introduction for Language Teachers

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-300-8

Andy Kirkpatrick and and Zhichang Xu

Perspectives on Writing Series (The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-300-8 (paperback; $30; £20; $30 CAD; €24; $29 AUD); 978-1-60235-301-5 (hardcover; $60; £40; $60 CAD; €48; $58 AUD); 978-1-60235-302-2 (Adobe eBook; $20; £14; $21 CAD; €16; $19 AUD) © 2012 by Andy Kirkpatrick and Zhichang Xu. 229 pages, with notes and bibliography. Published by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse.

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Description

In Chinese Rhetoric and Writing: An Introduction for Language Teachers, Andy Kirkpatrick and and Zhichang Xu offer a response to the argument that Chinese students’ academic writing in English is influenced by “culturally nuanced rhetorical baggage that is uniquely Chinese and hard to eradicate.” Noting that this argument draws from “an essentially monolingual and Anglo-centric view of writing,” they point out that the rapid growth in the use of English worldwide calls for “a radical reassessment of what English is in today’s world.” The result is a book that provides teachers of writing, and in particular those involved in the teaching of English academic writing to Chinese students, an introduction to key stages in the development of Chinese rhetoric, a wide-ranging field with a history of several thousand years. Understanding this important rhetorical tradition provides a strong foundation for assessing and responding to the writing of this growing group of students.

About the Authors

Andy Kirkpatrick is Professor and Head, School of Languages and Linguistics, at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. Directly prior to that he was Director of the Research Centre into Language Education and Acquistion in Multilingual Societies at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. He is the author of English as a Lingua Franca in ASEAN: A Multilingual Model (Hong Kong University Press, 2010) and the editor of the Routledge Handbook of World Englishes (2010). He is editor of the journal Multilingual Education and of the book series of the same name (both with Springer).

Zhichang Xu is a lecturer in English as an International Language (EIL) at Monash University, Australia. His research areas include Chinese English (as an emerging Expanding Circle variety of English), English language teaching (ELT), intercultural education, blended teaching and learning, academic writing, and Chinese studies. He is the author of Chinese English: Features and Implications (Hong Kong Open University Press, 2010), and the lead author of Academic Writing in Language and Education Programmes (Pearson, 2011).

Contents

Introduction
1 Rhetoric in Ancient China
2 The Literary Background and Rhetorical Styles
3 The Rules of Writing in Medieval China and Europe
4 The Ba Gu Wen(八股文)
5 Shuyuan and Chinese Writing Training and Practice
6 Principles of Sequencing and Rhetorical Organisation: Words, Sentences and Complex Clauses
7 Principles of Sequencing and Rhetorical Organisation: Discourse and Text
8 The End of Empire and External Influences
9 Party Politics, the Cultural Revolution and Charter 08
10 A Review of Contemporary Chinese University Writing (Course) Books
Conclusion
Works Cited
Notes

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Class Politics: The Movement for the Students’ Right to Their Own Language (2e)

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-418-0

Stephen Parks

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-418-0 (paperback, $32, £22, $32 CAD,  €25, $32 AUD); 978-1-60235-419-7 (hardcover, $65,  £43, $65 CAD, €50, $65 AUD); 978-1-60235-420-3 (Adobe ebook, $20, £14, $20 CAD,  €16, $20 AUD). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 363 pages with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Best of the Independent Journals FlyerDownload the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format).


Description

Class Politics The Movement for the Students’ Right to Their Own Language (2e) is a response to histories of Composition Studies that focused on scholarly articles and university programs as the generative source for the field. Such histories, particularly in the 1980s and 1990s divorced the field from activist politics—washing out such work in the name of disciplinary identity. Class Politics shows the importance of political mass movements in the formation of Composition Studies—particularly Civil Rights and Black Power. Class Politics also critiques how the field appropriates these movements. The book traces a pathway from social movement, to progressive academic groups, to their work in professional organizations, to the formation of the Students’ Right to Their Own Language. Stephen Parks then shows how the SRTOL was attacked and politically neutralized by conservative forces in the 1980s and 1990s, arguing for a return to politics to reanimate it’s importance—and the importance of politics in the field.

“Stephen Parks restores politics to the history of Composition Studies.”
—Richard Ohmann

About the Author

Stephen Parks is Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University’s Writing Program, where he also serves as Director of Graduate Studies. In addition to Class Politics: The Movement for a Students’ Right To Their Own Language, he is the author of Gravyland: Writing Beyond the Curriculum in the City of Brotherly Love (Syracuse University Press, 2010). He has also published in College English, College Composition and Communication, Reflections (of which he is the former editor), and Community Literacy Journal.

Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgments (2000)
Acknowledgments (2013)
Introduction: Class Politics, 2013
Introduction: Rediscovering Class Politics
1 Tracking the Student
2 New Left Politics and the Process Movement
3 Black Power/Black English
4 Locking Horns: The NUC Encounters the MLA, NCTE, and CCCC, 1968–1972
5 The Students’ Right to Their Own Language, 1972–1974
6 A Coup d’Etat and Love Handles, 1974–1983
7 Ozymandias—Creating a Program for the SRTOL
Appendix 1: Students’ Right To Their Own Language
Appendix 2: To the CCCC Executive Committee
Bibliography
Index

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Composition Studies Through a Feminist Lens

$20.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-414-2

Shari J. Stenberg

Lenses on Composition Studies
Edited by Sheryl I. Fontaine and Steve Westbrook

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-414-2 (paperback $20); 978-1-60235-415-9 (hardcover, $50); 978-1-60235-416-6 (Adobe eBook, $16). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 119 pages, with notes, questions for discussion, and bibliographies.

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Description

Composition Studies Through a Feminist Lens offers students a lucid and engaging introduction to the discipline’s history, struggles, and accomplishments through the lens of feminism.  By illuminating a vast array of feminist contributions to the rhetorical tradition, writing theory, and classroom pedagogy, Shari J. Stenberg shows how feminist scholars have made Composition Studies a more inclusive and innovative field.

Stenberg introduces Composition Studies through three of its origin stories—the Harvard exam, the rhetorical tradition, and the process paradigm—with an eye on how efforts to legitimize the field often resulted in the marginalization of women’s voices and feminist knowledge. Composition Studies Through a Feminist Lens then moves feminist knowledge to the center, showing how feminist scholars have revised these stories to offer a more expansive approach to the purposes and processes of writing and rhetoric. Part one features feminist expansions of rhetoric, showcasing how feminist scholars have revised the traditional values and practices of classical rhetoric that shape contemporary ideas about argument and writing. Part two shifts to the composition classroom, showing how feminists have revised the role of student, teacher, and researcher. Students will gain a sense of how feminist contributions have expanded possibilities for learning and writing in the composition classroom.  In addition to providing a compelling overview of feminist contributions to Composition Studies, Stenberg supplies engaging discussion questions designed to facilitate readers’ connections among the material presented, their writing lives, and contemporary culture—thereby adding their own voices to the stories of our field.

Composition Studies Through a Feminist Lens is the third volume in Parlor Press’s Lenses on Composition Studies series, which features texts written specifically for upper-level undergraduate and entry-level graduate courses in Composition Studies.

About the Author

Shari J. Stenberg is Associate Professor of English and the Composition Program Director at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she teaches courses in writing, feminist rhetorics, and pedagogy. She is the author of Professing and Pedagogy: Learning the Teaching of English and her writing on pedagogy, teacher development, and feminist theory appears in journals including College English, College Composition and Communication, Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition and Culture, and Composition Studies.

Contents

Acknowledgments

1 Composition’s Origin Stories Through a Feminist Lens

The Origin Stories of Composition Studies Through a Feminist Lens
The Harvard Story: The Birth of Composition Studies from a Test and a Course
For Writing and Discussion
Classical Rhetoric as Composition’s Proper Ancestor
For Writing and Discussion
The Process Paradigm: Composition as a Science
For Writing and Discussion
Looking Ahead
Works Cited
For Further Reading

2 The Rhetorical Tradition Through a Feminist Lens: Locating Women

Locating Women among Ancient Voices: Aspasia and Diotima
For Writing and Discussion
Locating Available Means to Authority: Women’s Rhetorical Challenges to the Church
For Writing and Discussion
Locating Women’s Rhetorical Challenges to Femininity
For Writing and Discussion
Locating a Public Voice: The Rhetoric of the Suffragists and Abolitionists
For Writing and Discussion
Works Cited
For Further Reading

3 Difference, Form, and Topoi Through a Feminist Lens

Acknowledging Difference among Women
For Writing and Discussion
 Rejecting the Master’s Tools
For Writing and Discussion
Revising Rhetorical Contexts
Works Cited
For Further Reading

4 Teacher and Student Identity Through a Feminist Lens

The Teacher as the (Feminized) Disciplinarian: Cleaning Student Texts, Cleaning Students
For Writing and Discussion
The Composition Teacher as (Maternal) Nurturer
For Writing and Discussion
Writing Teacher, Critical Teacher
For Writing and Discussion
Where We Are, Where We’re Headed: The Composition Teacher as Rhetor
For Writing and Discussion
Works Cited
For Further Reading

5 Research and Writing Through a Feminist Lens: A Focus on Experience

Raising Consciousness of and about Women Writers
For Writing and Discussion
From Research on Gender to Feminist Research
For Writing and Discussion
The Evolving use of Experience
For Writing and Discussion
Works Cited
For Further Reading

6 Argument Through a Feminist Lens

Persuasion, Conflict, and Negotiation Through a Feminist Lens
For Writing and Discussion
Beyond the Monologic Voice
For Writing and Discussion
Rhetorical Listening
For Writing and Discussion
From Monologic to Dialogic: A Feminist Revision of Argument
Works Cited
For Further Reading
Epilogue
Works Cited
Notes
Index
About the Author

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Condominium of the Flesh

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-748-8

Valerio Magrelli
Translated from the Italian by Clarissa Botsford

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-748-8 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-749-5 (PDF on CD. $12) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 106 pages.

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Description

A darkly humorous exploration of the human body and its various functions in poetic prose, Valerio Magrelli's personal chronicle of clinical experience catalogues a life history of ailments without ever being pathological. Every sensation and malfunction is placed under the subjective microscope of the poet's eye and examined in excruciating and obsessive detail. This Gray's Anatomy of the soul leads the reader on an inside-out voyage of discovery, with many surprises on the way. One of Italy's most celebrated living poets, Valerio Magrelli has also attracted an international following.

Praise for Valerio Magrelli's Poetry

Molino's translations of Valerio Magrelli's poetry bring to English-speaking readers some of the most astounding verse to be found in contemporary Italian letters. Here, a great deal of precious cargo has made it intact to the shores of the English-speaking world, and we are enriched by the arrival of such rich, strange, and new matter. —Rebecca West

I used to read a great many Italian poets. Nowhere near as many in recent years—though I've seen things by a young poet that I like very much. His name is Magrelli. —Joseph Brodsky

His poetry is a soliloquy written with a pencil and a small note-book, during the latest and most silent hours of the night. It's a poetry that looks at itself, but at the sight of its thought, vanishes. —Octavio Paz

Magrelli's poems make me feel good because they are so smart. Aphoristic and quirky, they seem from another millennium. I eat them up like clusters of grapes, and when I'm done I want more. I love their wry modesty, their strange truisms, and their beautiful succinctness. —Henri Cole

Valerio Magrelli . . . represents, to this reader at least, a new moment in Italian poetry. In the good-natured ease with which he shows off his mastery of the traditional tools of his trade, and the elegant way he lets the reader know he knows that writing is about writing, he advertises his membership in an international con-fraternity whose current English-language practitioners include Mark Strand and, especially, Paul Muldoon. Magrelli, a scholar of French literature and an experienced translator, is obsessed by the "translation" involved in all writing, and thus by language games that reveal the complex inner life of words. . . . Language itself is, naturally, one of this poet's prime subjects; Dante, he tells us, in a typically cheeky, inspired acrostic, is the "DNA of poETry," and the structure of his terza rima is the literary double-helix that contains "the future of the mother tongue" in the same way that the ur-poet's name magically incorporates life's ultimate building block. I know of no other Italian poet today who writes with such a capacious grasp of the enormous, still-to-be-discovered potentialities of the great treasure-house of Italian. Here is a writer whose energy and gifts open a doorway onto an expansive future. —Jonathan Galassi

About the Author

Valerio Magrelli (Rome, 1957) is the author of six poetry collections, for which he has won among other prizes the Mondello, the Viareggio, the Montale and the Premio Antonio Feltrinelli-Accademia dei Lincei: Ora serrata retinae (Feltrinelli, 1980), Nature e venature (Mondadori, 1987), Esercizi di tiptologia (Mondadori, 1992), Didascalie per la lettura di un giornale (Einaudi, 1999), and Disturbi del sistema binario (Einaudi, 2006), and Il sangue amaro (Einaudi, 2014). He has published four books of prose: Nel condominio di carne (Einaudi 2002), La vicevita. Treni e viaggi in treno (Laterza 2009), Addio al calcio (Einaudi 2010), and Geologia di un padre (Einaudi 2013), as well as critical studies on Dadaism, Paul Valéry, Charles Baudelaire and notable translations of Molière, Beaumarchais, Mallarmé, Verlaine, Debussy, Koltès, and Barthes.

A Professor of French literature at the University of Pisa and then Cassino, he is also a frequent contributor to the cultural pages of the Italian dailiy “La Repubblica.” His poems have been translated into several languages. In English: Nearsights: Selected Poems (translated by A. Molino, Graywolf Press, 1991), The Contagion of Matter (Holmes & Meyer, 2000), “Instructions on How to Read a Newspaper” and Other Poems (Chelsea Editions, 2008), The Embrace (Faber & Faber, 2009; winner of  the Oxford-Weidenfeld Prize and the John Florio Prize) and Vanishing Points (bilingual edition of The Embrace, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010).

About the Translator

Clarissa Botsford has worked in the fields of teaching, intercultural education, editing, translating and publishing and is also a singer, violinist, and lay celebrant. She currently teaches English and Translation Studies at Rome University. In 2014, her translation of the novel Sworn Virgin by Elvira Dones was published by And Other Stories.

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Contingency, Immanence, and the Subject of Rhetoric

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-363-3

Timothy Richardson

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Series Editors: Patricia Sullivan, Catherine Hobbs, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-363-3 (paperback, $27) 978-1-60235-364-0 (hardcover, $60) 978-1-60235-365-7 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 187 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Contingency, Immanence, and the Subject of Rhetoric considers rhetoric as the historical counterpoint of philosophical and religious discourses via its correspondences with antique rabbinic exegetical practices and contemporary psychoanalytic insights into causation. Timothy Richardson takes up the rabbinic position to demonstrate how traditional Greco-Christian rhetoric might be insufficient to account for what we now mean by rhetoric as a discipline.  He argues that rhetoric as an academic discipline is different from philosophy insofar as it takes as its object the missing cause of performance, of writing, of inquiry itself inherent in the contingency of their status as events. Rhetorical inquiry offers a mode of reading and writing that is premised upon (for Kenneth Burke) unspoken, often unspeakable motives and (for Jacques Lacan) impossible desire so that rhetorical analysis, in Lacan’s words, “impl[ies] in the text what it itself neglected.” The result is a position from which all events (spoken, written, acted, whatever) are present and contingent acts that resist narrative cohesion because they are founded on a necessary lack in the subject. Contingency, Immanence, and the Subject of Rhetoric includes a Forward by David Metzger.

About the Author

Timothy Richardson’s work has appeared in such journals as JAC, Kairos, Pre/Text, Paris Review, and Western Humanities Review. He is Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches courses in antique and contemporary rhetorics, psychoanalytic theory, media studies, and writing. He lives in Fort Worth, Texas with his wife, fiction writer Laura Kopchick, and their two children, Harper and Ben.

Contents

Forward by David Metzger
Acknowledgments
Introductio
1 An Image to Honor and Worship
2 Rhetoric as Mitzvah
3 But the Greatest of These Is Love
4 Nothing But the Effects of Those Instances of Saying
5 What Stops Not Being Written
Notes
Works Cited
Index
About the Author

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Contrapuntal

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-367-1

Christopher Kondrich

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-367-1 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-368-8 (Adobe ebook, $14). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 89 pages.

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Reviews

What People Are Saying about Contrapuntal . . .

“An understanding of the nature of consciousness reveals itself to be more elusive the longer one tries to approach it. The closer we get, the more vivid the confusion is. And this is the case regarding not only our handle on consciousness, but also the one we have on identity and even on reality itself, both of which depend upon consciousness—and all three of which, ultimately, prove more malleable than we might care to admit. They can be, and are often, altered by pharmaceuticals, self-scrutiny, the influence of others, one’s own force of will, illness, and even just through our constant interplay with what we call the world. In Contrapuntal, an enormously ambitious and masterful debut, Christopher Kondrich has shaped this material into a work of such inventiveness, wit, wisdom, bravura, tenderness and beauty, it leaves me in awe. Or rather, it brings me back to a level of awe I had forgotten I had access to, restoring to their original size my hopes for what a book of poetry might accomplish. I am inordinately grateful for this book.” — Timothy Donnelly

“Before the book begins, the book begins, with contrapuntal movement: “So I take  my hand, / and even though I know my hand, / I know I know it, / it feels like your hand.” Throughout the remaining books of this book, a singular duality continues to play, and it is a play of the body, of hands—“I can feel the sounds / between my hands / as I clasp them to play.” In this latter poem, toward the end of the collection, the play on “play” and “pray” is especially apt and emotionally wrought, and—caught up as it is with music, with playing of sounds into emotional sense—such play is both profound and continually delightful. This is a book that needs to be known.” — Bin Ramke 

“Christopher Kondrich’s Contrapuntal is an eerie world of dysymphony and desire, in which the actors have lost their way among objects and senses.  Scraps of sound and thought float free, unmoored from belief, and suggest we find a way to bring weight back to the human world.  This is a strangely comforting dystopia, pleasing to linger in, a place made of mood and novelistic smoke, the characters in it so clearly our own.” — Eleni Sikelianos

About the Author

Christopher Kondrich is a PhD candidate at the University of Denver and an editor for Denver Quarterly. His poetry has been published in American Letters & Commentary, Barrow Street, Boston Review, Cimarron Review, Free Verse, Meridian, Seneca Review, Verse Daily and elsewhere. He lives in Denver.

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Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-262-9

Edited by Martine Courant Rife, Shaun Slattery, and Dànielle Nicole DeVoss

Perspectives on Writing Series (The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-262-9 (paperback, $40); 978-1-60235-263-6 (hardcover, $80); 978-1-60235-264-3 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20). © 2011 by Martine Courant Rife, Shaun Slattery, and Dànielle Nicole DeVoss. 432 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index. Published by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse.

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Description

The editors of Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom bring together stories, theories, and research that can further inform the ways in which we situate and address intellectual property issues in our writing classrooms. The essays in the collection identify and describe a wide range of pedagogical strategies, consider theories, present research, explore approaches, and offer both cautionary tales and local and contextual successes. Essays are contributed by Timothy R. Amidon, Brian Ballentine, Barclay Barrios, Dànielle Nicole DeVoss, Katie Donnelly, Robert Dornsife, Jeffrey Galin, Kathie Gossett, E. Ashley Hall, TyAnna Herrington, Renee Hobbs, Rebecca Moore Howard, Tharon W. Howard, John Logie, Nicole Nguyen, James E. Porter, Clancy Ratliff, Jessica Reyman, Jim Ridolfo, Martine Courant Rife, Shaun Slattery, Elizabeth Vincelette, Janice R. Walker, Steve Westbrook, Russel Wiebe, and Bob Whipple.

About the Editors

Martine Courant Rife, JD, PhD, is a professor of writing at Lansing Community College, where she teaches courses in digital authorship, technical and business writing, and first-year composition. She serves as Senior Chair of the CCCC-IP Caucus and is a CCCC-IP Committee member. Rife received the 2007 Frank R. Smith Outstanding Journal Article Award for “Technical Communicators and Digital Writing Risk Assessment.”

Shaun Slattery is a strategy consultant for a social software company and has been a faculty member at DePaul University and the University of South Florida Polytechnic, where he taught technical and professional writing and new media. His research on digital writing practices has been published in Technical Communication Quarterly; Technical Communication; Rhetorically Rethinking Usability: Theories, Practices, and Methodologies (Hampton Press, 2009); and Digital Writing Research: Technologies, Methodologies, and Ethical Issues (Hampton Press, 2007).

Dànielle Nicole DeVoss is a professor of professional writing at Michigan State University. Her co-edited collections include Digital Writing Research: Technologies, Methodologies, and Ethical Issues (with Heidi McKee; Hampton, 2007), which won the 2007 Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award, and Technological Ecologies and Sustainability (with Heidi McKee and Dickie Selfe; Computers and Composition Digital Press, 2007). She also published—with Elyse Eidman-Aadahl and Troy Hicks—Because Digital Writing Matters (Jossey-Bass, 2010).

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Country Album

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-277-3

James Capozzi

Winner of the New Measure Poetry Prize

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-277-3 (paperback, $14; £10; $15 CAD; €11; $15 AUS); 978-1-60235-278-0 (Adobe ebook on CD, $14; £10; $15 CAD; €11; $15 AUS) © 2012 by Parlor Press. 82 pages.

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Praise for James Capozzi's Country Album

James Capozzi's Country Album is an important book. The rendering of the poems is flawless, so much so that they have an extraordinary perceptual and tonal range. Country Album is a penetrating and fascinating collection. —Michael Burkard

At one moment, while reading James Capozzi’s manuscript, it occurred to me that he might actually be a Martian who learned to write by studying the incomplete works of John Donne, Raymond Queneau and J. G. Ballard. But that only tells part of the story. He seems to have traveled to different countries—Spain, New Jersey, and Nevada--and recognized that all of them are foreign. Ghosts and ghostly voices rise up from the ground. Without falling into some obvious pattern or strategy, Capozzi puts words together that sound as if they have been connubial all along. The best poems worm their way into the reader’s brain, adding their own wires and synapses.  —John Yau

In Capozzi’s Country Album, we have nothing of the simplicity invoked by the pairing of the words: “country album.” It is as if the poet were blessed with a permanent quirk, something “wrong” in his mental structure that allows him to traverse all worlds at once, real and imaginary. What continues to astonish me long after reading this book is the fact that not a single moment in any one poem is predictable. The title poem of the collection is perhaps the only clue to what drives this relentless imagination: “articulate lilac//goat illuminat/ed against night/sky//so lacking spontaneity/it fails//to move us.” To avoid, at all costs, the failure “to move us,” might just be this poet’s credo—how else do we explain such extraordinary links of time and space?  —Larissa Szporluk

James Capozzi was born in West Milford, New Jersey. He attended The College of New Jersey and The University of Texas at Austin, where he was a founding editor of Bat City Review and the recipient of a James A. Michener Fellowship. Country Album is the winner of the 2010 New Measure Poetry Prize. He lives in Binghamton, New York, where he is a PhD candidate at Binghamton University.

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Critical Conversations About Plagiarism

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-348-0

Edited by Michael Donnelly, Rebecca Ingalls, Tracy Ann Morse, Joanna Castner Post, and Anne Meade Stockdell-Giesler

Lenses on Composition Studies
Edited by Sheryl I. Fontaine and Steve Westbrook

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-348-0 (paperback, $27) 978-1-60235-349-7 (hardcover, $55) 978-1-60235-350-3 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20) © 2012 by Parlor Press. 242 pages, with notes, questions for discussion, and bibliographies.

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Description

Most treatments of plagiarism as part of undergraduate education deal with the issue in an overly simplistic and misleading fashion, tending to imply that plagiarism is a concept easily understood and easily avoided, casting the problem as an ethical issue—a choice between honesty and dishonesty—and/or as a technical issue, best avoided by attention to appropriate citation formats.

Edited by Michael Donnelly, Rebecca Ingalls, Tracy Ann Morse, Joanna Castner Post, and Anne Meade Stockdell-Giesler, Critical Conversations About Plagiarism instead invites students and teachers to engage in deep, critical discussions about a complicated topic in ways that are both accessible and intellectually challenging. The essays address a range of complex, interrelated ideas, concepts, and issues: theories about knowledge creation and ideas about authorship; issues of collaboration, borrowing, remixing, and plagiarism; copyright and intellectual property; historical constructions of authorship; student and teacher identities and roles; cross-cultural perspectives on plagiarism; and the impact of new technologies. Contributors include Phillip Marzluf, Jessica Reyman, Esra Mirze Santesso, Paul Parker, Richard Schur, Martine Courant Rife, Dànielle Nicole DeVoss, Deborah Harris-Moore, Sean Zwagerman, Bridget M. Marshall, Rachel Knaizer, Lise Buranen, and Anne-Marie Pedersen.
Rather than speak down to students about what they don’t know or understand, these essays invite students to explore and discuss in depth the controversies about plagiarism that writers constantly negotiate across a variety of contexts. Critical Conversations About Plagiarism makes such discussions accessible to undergraduate and graduate students, and, at the same time, it provides teachers with tools for facilitating those conversations.

Critical Conversations About Plagiarism is the second volume in Parlor Press’s Lenses on Composition Studies series, which features texts written specifically for upper-level undergraduate and entry-level graduate courses in composition studies.

About the Editors

Michael Donnelly is Assistant Professor of English at Ball State University, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in rhetoric and writing. Rebecca Ingalls is Assistant Professor and Director of the Freshman Writing Program at Drexel University. Tracy Ann Morse is Director of Writing Foundations and Assistant Professor in the Department of English at East Carolina University. Joanna Castner Post  is Associate Professor of Writing and Writing Center Director at the University of Central Arkansas. Anne Meade Stockdell-Giesler formerly taught at Boston University and the University of Tampa and now works independently as an editor, writer, and copyeditor.

Contents

Introduction
Contents
Preface           
Introduction   
Part I. Definitions of Plagiarism: Distinctions, Laws, and Rules
1 Examining Teachers’ and Students’ Attitudes towards Plagiarism
     Phillip Marzluf     
2  Plagiarism vs. Copyright Law: Is All Copying Theft?
     Jessica Reyman     
3  Art and the Question of Borrowing: Approaches to Plagiarism in Literature Courses
     Esra Mirze Santesso         
4  From Rules to Judgment: Exploring the Plagiarism Threshold in Academic Writing
     Paul Parker
End of Part I Questions

Part II. Texts, Technologies, and Surveillance
5  Sampling Is Theft? Creativity and Citation after Hip Hop
     Richard Schur        
6  Teaching Plagiarism: Remix as Composing
     Martine Courant Rife and Dànielle Nicole DeVoss          
7  Instructors as Surveyors, Students as Criminals: Turnitin and the Culture of Suspicion
     Deborah Harris-Moore     
8  A Marked Resemblance: Students, Teachers, and the Dynamics of Plagiarism
     Sean Zwagerman
End of Part II Questions        

Part III. Authorship and Ownership: Cultural and Cross-Cultural Perspectives
9  Who Cares about Plagiarism? Cheating and Consequences in the Pop Culture Classroom
     Bridget M. Marshall         
10  Finding the Source: The Roots and Problems of Plagiarism
     Rachel Knaizer      
11  Plagiarism and Cross-Cultural Mythology
     Lise Buranen         
12  Thinking Globally about Plagiarism: International Academic Writers’ Perspectives
     Anne-Marie Pedersen
End of Part III Questions  

Index
About the Editors and Contributors

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Critical Expressivism: Theory and Practice in the Composition Classroom

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-651-1

Edited by Tara Roeder and Roseanne Gatto

Perspectives on Writing
Series Editor, Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-651-1 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-652-8 (hardcover, $65); 978-1-60235-653-5 (pdf, $20) © 2015 Tara Roeder and Roseanne Gatto. 315 pages with illustrations and bibliographies.

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Description

Critical Expressivism: Theory and Practice in the Composition Classroom is an ambitious attempt to re-appropriate intellectual territory that has more often been charted by its detractors than by its proponents. Indeed, as Peter Elbow observes in his contribution to this volume, "As far as I can tell, the term 'expressivist' was coined and used only by people who wanted a word for people they disapproved of and wanted to discredit." The editors and contributors to this collection invite readers to join them in a new conversation, one informed by "a belief that the term expressivism continues to have a vitally important function in our field."

About the Editors

Tara Roeder is an Associate Professor with the Institute for Writing Studies at St. John's University. She earned her doctorate in English from the CUNY Graduate Center in 2014. Her research focuses on feminist theory and women's memoir; non-oedipal psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy; and queer theory and pedagogy.  

Roseanne Gatto is an Associate Professor with the Institute for Writing Studies at St. John's University. She earned her doctorate in composition and rhetoric at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2011. Her research interests include archival research methods and social justice in composition/rhetoric.

Contents

Preface: Yes, I Know That Expressivism Is Out of Vogue, But …
Lizbeth Bryant
Re-Imagining Expressivism: An Introduction
Tara Roeder and Roseanne Gatto

Section One: Critical Self-Construction
"Personal Writing" and "Expressivism" as Problem Terms
Peter Elbow
Selfhood and the Personal Essay: A Pragmatic Defense      
Thomas Newkirk
Critical Memoir and Identity Formation: Being, Belonging, Becoming
Nancy Mack
Critical Expressivism's Alchemical Challenge
Derek Owens
Past-Writing: Negotiating the Complexity of Experience and Memory
Jean Bessette
Essai—A Metaphor: Writing to Show Thinking
Lea Povozhaev

Section Two:Personal Writing and Social Change       
Communication as Social Action: Critical Expressivist Pedagogies in the Writing Classroom
Patricia Webb Boyd
From the Personal to the Social
Daniel F. Collins
"Is it Possible to Teach Writing So That People Stop Killing Each Other?" Nonviolence, Composition, and Critical Expressivism
Scott Wagar
The (Un)Knowable Self and Others: Critical Empathy and Expressivism
Eric Leake

Section 3: Histories
John Watson Is to Introspectionism as James Berlin Is to Expressivism (And Other Analogies You Won't Find on the SAT)
Maja Wilson
Expressive Pedagogies in the University of Pittsburgh's Alternative Curriculum Program, 1973-1979
Chris Warnick
Rereading Romanticism, Rereading Expressivism: Revising "Voice" through Wordsworth's Prefaces
Hannah J. Rule
Emerson's Pragmatic Call for Critical Conscience: Double Consciousness, Cognition, and Human Nature
Anthony Petruzzi

Section Four: Pedagogies
Place-Based Genre Writing as Critical Expressivist Practice
David Seitz
Multicultural Critical Pedagogy in the Community-Based Classroom: A Motivation for Foregrounding the Personal 
Kim M. Davis
The Economy of Expressivism and Its Legacy of Low/No-Stakes Writing
Sheri Rysdam
Revisiting Radical Revision    
Jeff Sommers
Contributors   

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Price: $32.00

Cross-Border Networks in Writing Studies

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-922-2

Derek Mueller, Andrea Williams, Louise Wetherbee Phelps, and Jennifer Clary-Lemon

Inkshed and Parlor Press

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-922-2 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-923-9 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-924-6 (PDF, $20; available April 2017)© 2017 by Inkshed. 205 pages, with notes, illustrations, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Cross-Border Networks in Writing Studies coordinates mixed methods approaches to survey, interview, and case study data to study Canadian writing studies scholars. The authors argue for networked disciplinarity, the notion that ideas arise and flow through intellectual networks that connect scholars not only to one another but to widening networks of human and nonhuman actors. Although the Canadian field is historically rooted in the themes of location and national culture, expressing a tension between Canadian independence and dependence on the US field, more recent research suggests a more hybridized North American scholarship rather than one defined in opposition to "rhetoric and composition" in the US. In tracing identities, roles, and rituals of nationally bound considerations of how disciplinarity has been constructed through distant and close methods, this multi-scaled, multi-scopic approach examines the texture of interdependent constructions of the Canadian discipline.

With an Afterword by Andrea Lunsford.

Cross-Border Networks in Writing Studies also launches a collaborative publishing network between Canadian publisher Inkshed and US publisher Parlor Press.

About the Authors

Jennifer Clary-Lemon is Associate Professor in Rhetoric, Writing, and Communications at the University of Winnipeg. Andrea Abernethy Lunsford is the Louise Hewlett Nixon Professor of English, Emerita, at Stanford University. Derek Mueller is Associate Professor of Written Communication and Director of the First-year Writing Program at Eastern Michigan University. Louise Wetherbee Phelps is Adjunct Professor of Rhetoric and Writing at Old Dominion University and Emeritus Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University. Andrea Williams is Associate Professor of Writing Instruction in the Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto.

Contents

1 Derek Mueller, Andrea Williams, Louise Wetherbee Phelps, and
Jennifer Clary-Lemon
Introduction: Becoming Networked, Cross-Border Scholars: Sources and Development of the Project

2 Derek Mueller
Emplaced Disciplinary Networks from Middle Altitude

3 Andrea Williams
Voicing Scholars' Networked Identities through Interviews

4 Louise Wetherbee Phelps
Four Scholars, Four Genres: Networked Trajectories

5 Jennifer Clary-Lemon
A Case-Study Approach to Examining Cross-Border Interdependencies

6 Derek Mueller, Andrea Williams, Louise Wetherbee Phelps, and Jennifer Clary-Lemon
Conclusion

7 Andrea Lunsford
Afterword

Index
About the Authors

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Price: $30.00

Crossroads: The Writing of the Trans-Atlantic Worker Writer Federation, Volume II

$19.95
SKU: 978-1-60235-951-2

Edited by Zachary Barlow, Rafeala Evans, and Molly Velazquez-Brown

Working and Writing for Change (A Parlor Press Imprint)
Edited by Steve Parks and Jess Pauszek

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-951-2 (paperback, $19.95); 978-1-60235-952-9 (PDF on CD, $14). © 2017 by New City Community Press. 172 pages with illustrations, notes, and bibliography.

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Description

Crossroads brings together writers from the United Kingdom and the United States to explore the experience of life's inevitable changes. It shares the experiences of the young student travelling abroad, the long-time resident of a neighborhood looking at the changes time has produced, the immigrant considering the traditions brought forward into a new land, and the wonder of long-time friendships. In the process, Crossroads demonstrates a common lived experience that speaks across the Atlantic and towards the possibility of continued dialogue.

Crossroads is the second publication produced by the Trans-Atlantic Worker Writer Federation, a joint project by the FED and New City Community Press. The first publication, Pro(se)letariets, explored the experiences of working-class students in the United Kingdom and the United States.

Contents

Introduction, Ryan Bince
Republic of letters, Ashini Viyanga Fernando
Story of You, Isaris Baez
Janice Day- A Break of Routine, Bobby-Lee Verkuijl
For Jessica, John Malcomson
Counting the Years, Andrew Diamon
Stay, Christina Flower .
Having a Child, Beverly Bungay
History Of Us, Daisy Spoer
Lead the Way, Davida Hawks
Tripping, Ryan Bince
A Beer Drank Alone on a weekday Night, Ryan Bince
Are Writers Special People, Joana Matos
Postcards, Jordan Craig
Holding Hands, Sarah Frodsham
History of You, Tiarah Brown
Reaction to The Republic of Letters, Robert Joffery
Transference, Sunitha Webster
Giants, P. Evans
University of Wisconsin, Jordan Craig
The Bus, John Sheehy
Miseducation, Andrew Henry Smith
How to Write a Book, Katie Mctaggart
Home, Christina Flower
Stevenage Survivors, Duncan Stephen
After Villon, John Sheehy
History of Me, Daisy Spoer
Split Personality, John Sheehy
Presentations, Ryan Bince
There is no Other, Lucia Birch
Donkey, John Sheehy
Significance, Micheal Bungay
77 years old, Louis
Reaction to Republic of Letters, Louis Webster
The Future, Sylvia
Literary Institutions and Education Response, Deanna Tuit

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Price: $19.95

Current

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-200-1

Lisa Fishman

Free Verse Editions
Series Editor: Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-200-1 (paperback, $14; £10, $15 CAD, €12, $16 AUS) 978-1-60235-201-8 (Adobe eBook, $12, £9, $13 CAD, €10, $14 AUS) . © 2011 by Parlor Press. 106 pages.

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Description

Lisa Fishman's Current follows The Happiness Experiment (Ahsahta, 2007) further into an experience of time as theater, weather, myth, insect body, plantlife, transcription, synchrony, and figment. Her poems are pressed into argument and song by means of attention to the moment and to cross-currents of making, of music, over time. Current enacts a poetics of the uncanny in very close touch with the actual, creating a field of vibrations in which the possibilities and limitations of vision and art collide and change.

Praise for Lisa Fishman's work . . .

[H]er poems are consistently powerful in their close hewing to the physical world. —Publishers Weekly

"Part of what makes Fishman's work so pleasurable to read is the feeling of pure motion in the sounds and images [. . .], at once angular and wild, precise and hurtling." —Indiana Review

"Also implicit in Fishman's work is the idea that words are physical or material, that they come through sound from the body—are, in fact, part of the body." —How2

About the Author

Lisa Fishman lives in Orfordville and Madison, Wisconsin and teaches at Columbia College, Chicago. She is the author of three earlier books of poetry and most recently the chapbook, at the same time as scattering (Albion Books).

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Design Discourse: Composing and Revising Programs in Professional and Technical Writing

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-165-3

Edited by David Franke, Alex Reid, and Anthony DiRenzo

Perspectives on Writing Series (The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-165-3 (paperback, $32.00; £23; $34 CAD; €25; $37 AUD). © 2010 by David Franke, Alex Reid, and Anthony DiRenzo. 340 pages, with illustrations, notes, and bibliography.

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978-1-60235-166-0 (hardcover, $65.00; £47; $69 CAD; €51; $74 AUD); 978-1-60235-167-7 (Adobe eBook on CD, $20.00; £15; $22 CAD; €16; $24 AUD)

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Description

Design Discourse: Composing and Revising Programs in Professional and Technical Writing addresses the complexities of developing professional and technical writing programs. The essays in the collection offer reflections on efforts to bridge two cultures—what the editors characterize as the “art and science of writing”—often by addressing explicitly the tensions between them. Design Discourse: Composing and Revising Programs in Professional and Technical Writing offers insights into the high-stakes decisions made by program designers as they seek to “function at the intersection of the practical and the abstract, the human and the technical.”

Contributors include Diana L. Ashe, Brian D. Ballentine, Kelly Belanger, Julianne Couch, Anthony Di Renzo, James M. Dubinsky, Jude Edminster, David Franke, Gary Griswold, Dev Hathaway, Brent Henze, Colin K. Keeney, Michael Knievel, Carla Kungl, Carol Lipson, Andrew Mara, Jim Nugent, Anne Parker, Jonathan Pitts, Alex Reid, Colleen A. Reilly, Wendy B. Sharer, Christine Stebbins, and Janice Tovey.

About the Editors

David Franke teaches at SUNY Cortland, where he served as director of the professional writing program. He founded and directs the Seven Valleys Writing Project at SUNY Cortland, a site of the National Writing Project.

Alex Reid teaches at the University at Buffalo. His book, The Two Virtuals: New Media And Composition (Parlor Press, 2007) received honorable mention for the W. Ross Winterowd Award for Best Book in Composition Theory, and his blog, Digital Digs (http://alex-reid.net), received the John Lovas Memorial Academic Weblog award for contributions to the field of rhetoric and composition (2008).

Anthony Di Renzo teaches business and technical writing at Ithaca College, where he developed a Professional Writing concentration for its BA in Writing. His scholarship concentrates on the historical relationship between professional writing and literature.

Contents

Preface
Composing
1 The Great Instauration: Restoring Professional and Technical Writing to the Humanities
Anthony DiRenzo

2 Starts, False Starts, and Getting Started: (Mis)understanding the Naming of a Professional Writing Minor
Michael Knieval, Kelly Belanger, Colin Keeney, Julianne Couch, and Christine Stebbins

3 Composing a Proposal for a Professional / Technical Writing Program
W. Gary Griswold

4 Disciplinary Identities: Professional Writing, Rhetorical Studies, and Rethinking “English”
Brent Henze, Wendy Sharer, and Janice Tovey

Revising
5 Smart Growth of Professional Writing Programs: Controlling Sprawl in Departmental Landscapes
Diana Ashe and Colleen A. Reilly

6 Curriculum, Genre and Resistance: Revising  Identity in a Professional Writing Community
David Franke

7 Composing and Revising the Professional Writing Program at Ohio Northern University: A Case Study
Jonathan Pitts

Minors, Certificates, Engineering
8 Certificate Programs in Technical Writing: Through Sophistic Eyes
Jim Nugent

9 Shippensburg University’s Technical / Professional Communications Minor: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Carla Kungl and S. Dev Hathaway

10 Reinventing Audience through Distance
Jude Edminster and Andrew Mara

11 Introducing a Technical Writing Communication Course into a Canadian School of Engineering
Anne Parker

12 English and Engineering, Pedagogy and Politics
Brian D. Ballentine

Futures
13 The Third Way: PTW and the Liberal Arts in the New Knowledge Society
Anthony DiRenzo

14 The Write Brain: Professional Writing in the Post-Knowledge Economy
Alex Reid

Post-Scripts by Veteran Program Designers
15 A Techné for Citizens: Service-Learning, Conversation, and Community
James Dubinsky

16 Models of Professional Writing / Technical Writing Administration: Reflections of a Serial Administrator at Syracuse University
Carol Lipson

Biographical Notes

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Price: $32.00

Digital Publishing F5 | Refreshed

Second Edition
© 2003 by Parlor Press
ISBN: 1-932559-10-8

Edited by Kate Agena, Karl Stolley, Rita Wu, Christopher Eklund, Christopher Berry, Jingfang Ren, Jennie Blankert, David Blakesley, Serkan Gorkemli, Bob Stein, et al.

Download

Available for free download in Night Kitchen (TK3) format.

Digital Publishing F5 | Refreshed (Zip file; 6.2 MB)

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Description

This multimedia ebook was one of the first (of seven) books ever cataloged in the MLA International Bibliography in 2003. Designed, produced, and published at Computers and Writing 2003 at Purdue University in the Digital Learning Collaboratory, May 22, 2003, from 1:40 to 5:50 p.m. Illustration, "The History of Writing" © 2003 by Tobias Ott

Read news coverage about this book and the conference, "'Digital dimensions' of publishing explored at conference" (Journal and Courier; PDF format)

Contents

Dismantling the Angel

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-487-6

Eric Pankey

Winner of the New Measure Poetry Prize

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

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978-1-60235-487-6 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-488-3 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2014 by Parlor Press. 79 pages.

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Praise for Dismantling the Angel . . .

“In these precise, dream-like poems, Eric Pankey peers through the clarifying lens of metaphor and parable to meditate on mystery, human sympathy and the divine. Here, the shifting image of fire both articulates and consumes our sense of the vastness of history and the ineffable nature of divinity.  Elsewhere, a lemon, “transformed by one’s attention to it, is a spark pent up in a barn, is long shadows on a glacier. The lemon waits to be recognized like the inscrutable event of a miracle.” Or later, writing on complexities of compassion, Pankey describes a fox, terrified and snarling in a Havahart trap: ‘I had to shake him out of the cage with more violence than I’d have preferred.’ With Dismantling the Angel, Eric Pankey shows once more why he is one of the American poets I admire most. These are such deeply moving, humane, and thoughtful poems.”

Kevin Prufer

“‘This is important, thus I repeat myself,’ insists the speaker in the title poem of Eric Pankey’s Dismantling the Angel. And repeat himself he does. As he should, shuddering out such elusive and luminous sentences as ‘The fire retains only its shape, its shifting, ambiguous, wind-shredded shape.’ As he should, since his poems, more than anyone else’s, take the shape of fire, all its ambiguity and wind-shreddedness, all its likeness to poppies in the wheat.”

H. L. Hix

About the Author

Eric Pankey is the author of nine previous collections of poetry, including most recently The Pear as One Example: New and Selected Poems 1984–2008 and Trace. His work has been supported by fellowships from the Ingram Merrill Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts, the Brown Foundation, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. He is Professor of English and the Heritage Chair in Writing at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, where he teaches in the MFA and BFA programs in Creative Writing.

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Dreams and Nightmares

$22.95
SKU: 978-1-60235-939-0

I Fled Alone to the United States When I Was Fourteen

Liliana Velásquez
Edited and translated by Mark Lyons

Working and Writing for Change (A Parlor Press Imprint)
Edited by Steve Parks and Jess Pauszek

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-939-0 (paperback, $22.95), 978-1-60235-940-6 (PDF on CD, $14.00; coming in August, 2017) © 2017 by New City Community Press. 212 pages in full color, in both English and Spanish.

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Description

At fourteen, Liliana Velásquez walked out of her village in Guatemala and headed for the U.S. border, alone. On her two-thousand-mile voyage she was robbed by narcos, rode the boxcars of La Bestia, and encountered death in the Sonoran Desert. When she was caught by Immigration in Arizona, she thought her journey was over. But it had just begun.

A los catorce años, Liliana abandonó su pueblo en Guatemala y se dirigió hacia la frontera de los Estados Unidos, sola. En su viaje de dos mil millas fue asaltada por los narcos, viajó en los vagones de La Bestia y se enfrentó a la muerte en el desierto de Sonora. Cuando fue capturada por Inmigración en Arizona, ella pensó que su viaje había terminado. Pero solo acababa de empezar.

What People Are Saying

While Immigrants' stories are often told by others, Liliana shares her personal experience of vulnerability, resilience and perseverance in the face of uncertainty. She is a strong and remarkable woman.

Mientras que las historias de los inmigrantes son generalmente contadas por terceros, Liliana comparte su propia historia personal, su capacidad recuperativa y su perse­verancia en medio de mucha incertidumbre. Ella es una mujer fuerte y extraordinaria.
                 — María Sotomayor, DACA recipient, Youth Organizer, Pennsylvania Immigration and Citizenship Coalition

Stories like Liliana's counter the inhumane narratives that cast migrants and refugees as "drug dealers and rapists," and instead offer US audiences a perspective infused with the genuine human experience of migration.

Historias como la de Liliana contradicen a las historias des­humanizantes en las que se equipara a los inmigran­tes y refugiados con "narcotraficantes y violadores". La historia de Liliana ofrece al público estadounidense una perspectiva imbuida de una experiencia migratoria genuina­mente humana.
                 —Aja Y. Martinez, PhD, Syracuse University

Liliana's story is heartbreakingly ordinary, similar to tens of thousands of children who have fled violence, abuse, and extreme poverty, only to suffer further hardship at the hands of a US government that treats them as threats rather than child survivors of trauma.

La historia de Liliana es dolorosamente común, similar a la de decenas de miles de niños que han huido de la violencia, el abuso y la pobreza extrema, sólo para sufrir más adver­sidades a manos del gobierno de los E. U. que los trata como si fueran una amenaza y no como a niños sobre­vivientes de un trauma.
                            — Jonathan Blazer, Advocacy and Policy Counsel for Immigrants' Rights, American Civil Liberties Union

Contents

Introduction by Mark Lyons
            Prologue
I           Guatemala
Villaflor ◆ I Can't Take It Anymore
II          My Journey
Preparation ◆ Chiapas ◆ The Beast ◆ Oaxaca ◆ The Police Stop Us ◆ Mexico City ◆ Finally: Altar and the Border ◆ Captured ◆ House of Dreams
III         Philadelphia
My First Foster Family ◆ La Puerta Abierta / 
The Open Door ◆ My New Family ◆ Green
Card! ◆ My New House of Dreams ◆ My New High School ◆ Two Birthday Parties ◆ Thanksgiving ◆ Christmas ◆ My Quilt ◆ My Boyfriend ◆
The Return of the Coyote ◆ I Visit My Brothers ◆ An Adult Once Again ◆ My Second Visit to My Brothers ◆ Helping My Family in Guatemala
IV         Reflections
I Got Rid of My Fear ◆ Now I Have Two Families ◆ Fulfilling My Dreams
V          Finally, I Have Told My Story
Acknowledgments

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Ecologies of Writing Programs: Program Profiles in Context

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-511-8

Edited by Mary Jo Reiff, Anis Bawarshi, Michelle Ballif, and Christian Weisser

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-511-8 (paperback, $34); 978-1-60235-512-5 (hardcover, $68); 978-1-60235-513-2 (Adobe eBook, $20) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 415 pages with illustrations, bibliographies, and index.

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Description

Ecologies of Writing Programs: Program Profiles in Context contributes to our understanding of writing programs as complex ecological systems. The collection includes profiles of fifteen exemplary and innovative writing programs in their fluid, dynamic, and relational contexts, highlighting the ways in which writing programs—like all discursive systems—are ecologies. By examining writing programs as they exist within the context of interrelated, emergent institutional systems that are in constant flux, this collection complements broader perspectives on the history, theory, and practices of writing program administration, shifting the focus to how research and theory within the field of rhetoric and composition get enacted in particular programs and how histories and practices are enabled and constrained by particular institutional locations, contexts, and exigencies. With a focus on the constraints and challenges of developing writing programs, Ecologies of Writing Programs also extends important critical discussions of the working conditions of WPAs, highlighting material and managerial matters, along with the conflicting cultural and institutional issues that shape and are shaped by WPA work. The organization of each section highlights these complex and dynamic interrelationships, reflecting how writing programs are located in their institutional sites (from first-year composition to writing across the curriculum and writing in the disciplines to undergraduate majors in rhetoric and composition); how the activities of writing program administrators carve out new spaces for collaborative relationships and interactions; and how WPAs reposition programs and are themselves repositioned as they explore new sites for writing program administration.

About the Editors

Mary Jo Reiff is Professor of English at the University of Kansas, where she teaches courses in rhetoric and composition theory, public rhetoric, writing research, and composition pedagogy. Her books include Approaches to Audience: An Overview of the Major Perspectives (2004); Genre: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy (with Anis Bawarshi, 2010); and the textbooks Scenes of Writing: Strategies of Composing with Genres (with Amy Devitt and Anis Bawarshi, 2004) and Rhetoric of Inquiry (with Kirsten Benson, 2009). Articles related to her research on writing programs, writing knowledge transfer, audience theory, critical ethnography, and public genres have appeared in Written Communication, Composition Studies, Composition Forum, College English, JAC, and WAC Journal.  

Anis Bawarshi is Professor of English and former Director of the Expository Writing Program at the University of Washington, where he teaches courses in composition theory and pedagogy, rhetorical genre theory, discourse analysis, rhetoric, and knowledge transfer. He is currently series co-editor for Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition with Parlor Press and Program Profiles Co-Editor for the journal Composition Forum, and serves on the editorial board for the journal College Composition and Communication. His publications include Genre: A Historical, Theoretical, and Pedagogical Introduction (2010; with Mary Jo Reiff); Genre and the Invention of the Writer (2003); Scenes of Writing: Strategies for Composing with Genres (2004; with Amy J. Devitt and Mary Jo Reiff), A Closer Look: A Writer's Reader (2003; with Sidney I. Dobrin); and articles and book chapters on genre, uptake, invention, and knowledge transfer in composition.

Michelle Ballif is Associate Professor of English at the University of Georgia, where she teaches courses in rhetoric, composition, and contemporary theory, and where she directs the campus-wide writing-in-the-disciplines program that she founded. She is the former managing editor of the journal Composition Forum and the current Associate Editor of Rhetoric Society Quarterly as Editor for Special Issues. Her research focuses on the intersections between classical rhetoric and poststructuralist theory. She is the author of Seduction, Sophistry, and the Woman with the Rhetorical Figure; co-author of Women's Ways of Making It in Rhetoric and Composition; co-editor of Twentieth Century Rhetoric and Rhetoricians and Classical Rhetorics and Rhetoricians; and editor of Theorizing Histories of Rhetoric.

Christian Weisser is Associate Professor of English at Penn State Berks, where he coordinates both the Professional Writing Program and the Writing Across the Curriculum Program. Christian teaches courses in technical writing, environmental rhetoric, and the discourse of sustainability. He has served as Editor of Composition Forum since 2005. He is the author or editor of numerous publications including Moving Beyond Academic Discourse: Composition Studies and the Public Sphere (2001), Ecocomposition: Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives (2001, with Sid Dobrin), Natural Discourse: Toward Ecocomposition (2002, with Sid Dobrin), The Locations of Composition (2007, with Christopher Keller), and Sustainability: A Bedford Spotlight Reader (2013).

Contents

Acknowledgments
Writing Program Ecologies: An Introduction
Mary Jo Reiff, Anis Bawarshi, Michelle Ballif, and Christian Weisser
Part I. The Contested Ecologies of FYC Programs: Negotiating between Stability and Change
1 The Kairotic Moment: Pragmatic Revision of Basic Writing Instruction at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
Sara Webb-Sunderhaus and Stevens Amidon
2 Standardizing English 101 at Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Reflections on the Promise of Improved GTA Preparation and More Effective Writing Instruction  Ronda Leathers Dively
3 Taking the High Road: Teaching for Transfer in an FYC Program
Jenn Fishman and Mary Jo Reiff
4 Intractable Writing Program Problems, Kairos, and Writing-about-Writing: A Profile of the University of Central Florida's First-Year Composition Program
Elizabeth Wardle
Part II. Remapping Interdisciplinary Ecologies: WAC and WID Programs
5 The Writing Intensive Program at the University of Georgia
Michelle Ballif
6 Back to the Future: First-Year Writing in the Binghamton University Writing Initiative, State University of New York
Kelly Kinney and Kristi Murray Costello
7 Imagining a Writing and Rhetoric Program Based on Principles of Knowledge "Transfer": Dartmouth's Institute for Writing and Rhetoric
Stephanie Boone, Sara Biggs Chaney, Josh Compton, Christiane Donahue, and Karen Gocsik
Part III. Claiming Disciplinary Locations: The Undergraduate Major in Rhetoric and Composition
8 Diverse Lessons: Developing an Undergraduate Program in Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture at Texas A&M
Stephanie L. Kerschbaum and M. Jimmie Killingsworth
9 Reflections on the Major in Writing and Rhetoric at Oakland University
Lori Ostergaard, Greg A. Giberson, and Jim Nugent
10 The Case for a Major in Writing Studies: The University of Minnesota Duluth
David Beard
Part IV. Interconnected Sites of Agency: Situating Assessment within Institutional Ecologies
11 Self-Assessment as Programmatic Center: The First Year Writing Program and Its Assessment at California State University, Fresno
Asao B. Inoue
12 Utilizing Strategic Assessment to Support FYC Curricular Revision at Murray State University
Paul Walker and Elizabeth Myers
Part V. Third Spaces: Creating Liminal Ecologies
13 A Collaborative Approach to Information Literacy: First-year Composition, Writing Center, and Library Partnerships at West Virginia University
Laura Brady, Nathalie Singh-Corcoran,
Jo Ann Dadisman, and Kelly Diamond
14 The Peer-Interactive Writing Center at the University of New Mexico
Daniel Sanford
15 Writing the Transition to College: A Summer College Writing Experience at Elon University
Jessie L. Moore, Kimberly B. Pyne, and Paula Patch
Index
About the Editors

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Equipment for Living: The Literary Reviews of Kenneth Burke

$45.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-144-8

Kenneth Burke
Edited by Nathaniel A. Rivers and Ryan P. Weber

Equipment for Living coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-144-8 (paperback, $45.00; £31; €34; $47 CAD; $51 AUD); ©2010 by Parlor Press. 684 pages, with alternate tables of contents, appendices, and index.

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978-1-60235-145-5 (hardcover, $80.00; £55; €60; $84 CAD; $90 AUD); 978-1-60235-146-2 (Adobe eBook, $30.00; £21; €24; $32 CAD; $34 AUD)

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Description

Kenneth Burke has been widely praised as one of the sharpest readers of Shakespeare, Freud, and Marx, among others. He was also well known for turning his many book reviews into essays and excursions of his own, in the interest of tracking down the implications of terminologies and concepts, all the while grappling with some of the greatest minds of the twentieth century. Equipment for Living: The Literary Reviews of Kenneth Burk ecollects the bulk of his literary reviews, many of them reprinted here for the first time and positioning them as scholarship in their own right. In over 150 reviews, Burke explores poetic, fictional, and critical works to discern the nature of aesthetics, rhetoric, communication, literary theory, sociology, and literature as equipment for living. Along the way, he encounters some of the finest literary and critical minds of his day, including writers such as William Carlos Williams, e. e. cummings, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Thomas Mann, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, Shirley Jackson, Henry Miller, and Marianne Moore; and critics and philosophers such as John Dewey, J. L. Austin, Marshall McLuhan, Edmund Wilson, I. A. Richards, Denis Donoghue, Wayne Booth, Harold Bloom, Van Wyck Brooks, Waldo Frank, and Alfred North Whitehead. This collection organizes reviews across the wide range of fields that Burke engages, including literature, literary criticism, history, politics, philosophy, sociology, and biography.

About the Editors

Nathaniel A. Rivers (PhD, Purdue University) is Assistant Professor of English at Georgetown University. Ryan P. Weber, (PhD, Purdue University) is Assistant Professor of English at Penn State Altoona. Together, they received the Emergent Scholar Award from the Kenneth Burke Society in 2005.

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Price: $45.00

Evolution by the Numbers: The Origins of Mathematical Argument in Biology

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-216-2

James Wynn

Rhetoric of Science and Technology
Series Editor: Alan G. Gross

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-216-2 (paperback, $32, £22, $33 CAD, €26, $32 AUS); 978-1-60235-217-9 (hardcover, $65, £43, $67 CAD, €52, $65 AUS); 978-1-60235-218-6 (Adobe ebook on CD, $25; £17, $26 CAD, €21, $25 AUS). © 2012 by Parlor Press. 287 pages with illustration, appendices, notes, and bibliography.

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In Evolution by the Numbers: The Origins of Mathematical Argument in Biology, James Wynn examines the confluence of science, mathematics, and rhetoric in the development of theories of evolution and heredity in the nineteenth century. Evolution by the Numbers shows how mathematical warrants become accepted sources for argument in the biological sciences and explores the importance of rhetorical strategies in persuading biologists to accept mathematical arguments.

Evolution by the Numbers: The Origins of Mathematical Argument in Biology is an important addition to the growing corpus of work treating the historical and mathematical concerns behind the rhetoric of science. By tracing the genesis of the mathematical hegemony in biology through a rhetorical lens, Wynn has contributed to our understanding of how past debates in the scientific community have helped establish the dominant epistemology of contemporary society. More than that, it supplies an intriguing and little-known narrative starring some of the biggest names in biological naturalism, unveiling for the reader one of the many significant dramas of scientific history. Wynn has managed to activate the imagination of both the scholar and the interested layperson in an area of inquiry that is too often seen as remote, restrictive, and esoteric. —David J. Tietge, author of Rational Rhetoric: The Role of Science in Popular Discourse and Flash Effect: Science and the Rhetorical Origins of Cold War America

About the Author

James Wynn is Associate Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University. He has published articles in Rhetorica, Written Communication, and 19th Century Prose. His recent interests have been in rhetoric, science, mathematics, and public policy with a focus on nuclear power. He is a founder and current director of the Pittsburgh Consortium for Rhetoric and Discourse Studies.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Foreword: Variation, Evolution, Heredity and Mathematics in the 21st Century

1 Introduction
2 A Proper Science: Mathematics, Experience, and Argument in Nineteenth Century Science
3 Evolution by the Numbers: Mathematical Arguments in The Origin of Species
4 Hidden Value: Mendel, Mathematics, and the Case for Uniform Particulate Inheritance
5 Probable Cause: Rhetorical Strategies and Francis Galton’s Arguments for a Mathematical Model of Inheritance
6 Behind the Curve: Karl Pearson and the Push for Theoretical Mathematical Biology
7 Weightless Elephants on Frictionless Surfaces: The Ethos of Biometry

Conclusion
Afterword
Works Cited
Index
About the Author

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Price: $32.00

Expel the Pretender: Rhetoric Renounced and the Politics of Style

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-562-0

Eve Wiederhold

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Series Editors: Patricia Sullivan, Catherine Hobbs, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-562-0 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-563-7 (hardcover, $65) 978-1-60235-564-4 (PDF, $20) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 293 pages with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Political fights are not waged over who is speaking the truth but over whether any given claim seems to be authentic. Expel the Pretender: Rhetoric Renounced and the Politics of Style examines how rhetorical style influences judgments about how to communicate integrity and good will. Eve Wiederhold argues that attitudes about style's significance to judgment are both undertheorized and over-determined, especially when style is regarded as an embellishment rather than as a constitutive aspect of language use. Examining news reports covering controversial speakers including President Bill Clinton, Linda Tripp, and the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, she demonstrates how rhetorical style is both belittled and yet remains a focal point for assessing public figures who have been publicly rebuked and discredited. Expel the Pretender claims style as a conflicted site of materiality, critiquing contemporary rhetorical theories that configure style as a dependable resource for democratic inquiry. Wiederhold argues that conceptions of style's significance to judgment must be reframed to understand how we make decisions about who and what to believe.

About the Author

Eve Wiederhold received her PhD in English (Language, Literacy, and Rhetoric) from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She has taught courses in rhetoric and composition studies, literary theory, and feminist rhetorical theory at George Mason University, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and East Carolina University.  Her articles have appeared in JAC, Rhetoric Review, and The Raymond Carver Review, as well as several edited collections.

Contents

Introduction      
1 Authenticating the Liar
2 The Force of the Fit
3 The Politics of Ethos
4 Inhabiting the Call to Change
5 Conclusion: Passionate Linkages
Notes
Works Cited

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Price: $32.00

Facing the Sky: Composing through Trauma in Word and Image

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-449-4

Roy F. Fox

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Series Editors: Patricia Sullivan, Catherine Hobbs, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-449-4 (paperback, $32) | 978-1-60235-450-0 (hardcover, $65.00) | 978-1-60235-451-7 (Adobe eBook, $20) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 314 pages with notes, illustrations, bibliography, and index.

Interview
Listen to an interview with Roy F. Fox about Facing the Sky by Trevor Mattea at New Books in Education.

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Description

At forty-one, Lucy was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Kate lost her husband in a freak accident. These women—practical, intelligent, perceptive—were also language experts who had devoted their lives to the study and teaching of reading and writing. When these traumas shattered their normal lives, they turned to writing. Through extensive interviews, correspondence, and close analysis of their public and personal writing, Roy F. Fox details why and how writing helped these people make sense of their physical and emotional upheavals, exploring such issues as their motivation, fluency, awareness of audience, rhetorical decision-making, focused collaborations, and uses of secondary source material.

Praise for Facing the Sky

"Fox is both anthropologist and theorist. Reading Facing the Sky gives us remarkable perspective—and in the end distance­—on how writers have used symbolic systems to deal with pain. Yet all the while he is opening windows that cannot but lead us to experience some of the pain that his subjects write about."—PETER ELBOW (from the Foreword)

"Facing the Sky . . . breaks new ground and sows an abundance of seeds for a transformative pedagogy with the power to heal fractured souls in broken times. This book is not only for those in power--teachers, clinicians, politicians—but especially for those who have little or none—a book for NOW that unites theory and practice in a kind of prayer for our times."—SUSAN HUDSON

"Teachers of writing are bound to bump into student trauma before the first semester ends. When expressive writing is on the table, students soon wander into memory. Many will encounter scar tissue and open wounds from their past. Roy F. Fox . . . has written a valuable therapeutic prescription for composing through trauma. Facing the Sky offers a solid writing protocol grounded in narrative therapy and expressive therapies (art, writing, journaling). The approach he suggests is supported by contemporary neuroscience, which helps us understand that the brain heals when offered the right opportunities." —SUSAN REULING FURNESS, M.Ed, LCPC, LMFT, PTR

About the Author

Roy F. Fox currently serves as Professor of English Education and former Chair of the Department of Learning, Teaching, & Curriculum at the University of Missouri. He previously served in the Department of English at Boise State University as that university's first Director of Campus Writing. In this capacity, he led the revision of the Freshman English writing program, developed campus-wide graduation requirements for writing ability, and established a Writing across the Disciplines Program with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Fox's research focuses on the teaching and learning of language, writing, and media literacy—especially how people interact with television, film, and advertising messages. For the past decade these research interests have coalesced into his current focus on exploring how combinations of reading, writing, technology, and media can address physical and psychological trauma. In addition to numerous chapters and articles, Fox is the author of several books, including Images in Language, Media, & Mind; Technical Communication: Problems and Solutions; Harvesting Minds: How TV Commercials Control Kids; UpDrafts: Case Studies in Teacher Renewal; and MediaSpeak: Three American Voices. In 2010, Fox founded the journal, Engaging Cultures & Voices: Learning through Media. A former high school English teacher, Fox has received the Maxine Christopher Shutz Award for Distinguished Teaching and the William T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence.

Contents

Foreword
Peter Elbow
Acknowledgments
Introduction: An Unfinished Furrow
1 Composing through Trauma
2 Beyond "Just Academic Stuff": The Course, The Teacher, The Study
3 Lucy
4 Seven Writers Composing in Word and Image
5 Kate
6 Common Threads
7 Recommendations
Notes
Works Cited
Appendix A: The Course Syllabus
Appendix B: Research Questions
Appendix C: Assessing Thinking in Writing
About the Author
Index

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Fifteen Seconds without Sorrow

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-835-5

Shim Bo-Seon
Translated by Chung Eun-Gwi and Brother Anthony of Taizé

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-835-5 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-836-2 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 90 pages, in English.

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Description

Like many younger Korean poets, Shim Bo-Seon writes in an allusive, indirect style about topics that are in themselves familiar, eating rice, taking off clothes, living in an apartment block, struggling with human relationships. He captures some sparkling moments of joys and sorrows, hopes and frustrations that have been concealed in daily life in rather modest and witty words. The circular movements of concealment and revelation of the mystery that an individual experiences are evoked in turn, always lightly. As a poet-critic, Shim fills his lines with the melodies of plain speech, with subtle thoughts about relationships in the world.

Shim made his poetic debut in 1994, but he only published his first collection fourteen years later in 2008. Fifteen Seconds without Sorrow is a translation of that first volume, containing the poet's earliest, freshest poems. They are characterized by the subtlest feeling of the distance between fantasy and reality and a strong awareness of the difficulty of saying something significant simply. Shim raises the philosophical question of the meaning of living as a human being in the world, that is, where one is in this world at a certain moment. His poems epitomize the doubts, values, beliefs, and distance of the individual passing through the ordinary days and nights.

About the Poet

Shim Bo-Seon was born in Seoul in 1970, studied sociology at Seoul National University, and received his PhD from Columbia University, New York. He made his debut in the Chosun Ilbo Annual Spring Literary Contest in 1994 and published his first collection, Seulpeumi opneun sip o cho (Fifteen Seconds without Sorrow), in 2008. This was followed by Nunape opneun saram (Someone Not in Sight ) in 2011 and Geueurin yesul (Smoked Art) in 2013. He is currently a professor of Culture and Art Management at Kyung-Hee Cyber University. He is also a member of the Twenty-First Century Prospect Writer's Group.

About the Translators

Chung Eun-Gwi is Associate Professor in the Department of English Literature at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul. She received her PhD in Poetics at SUNY Buffalo in 2005. Her publications include articles, translations, poems, and reviews in various journals, including In/Outside: English Studies in Korea, Comparative Korean Studies, World Literature Today, Cordite, and Azalea. Brother Anthony of Taizé is currently Emeritus Professor of English at Sogang University, and Chair-Professor at the International Creative Writing Center, Dankook University. He has published more than thirty volumes of translated Korean poetry, as well as translations of several Korean novels, for which he has received a number of awards. His Korean name is An Sonjae.

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First-Year Composition: From Theory to Practice

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-518-7

Edited by Deborah Coxwell-Teague and Ronald F. Lunsford

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Series Editors: Patricia Sullivan, Catherine Hobbs, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-518-7 (paperback, $34) 978-1-60235-509-4 (hardcover, $65) 978-1-60235-520-0 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20). © 2014 by Parlor Press. 421 pages with notes, illustrations, syllabi, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Responding to a widespread belief that the field of composition studies is less unified than it was in the late twentieth century, editors Deborah Coxwell-Teague and Ronald F. Lunsford ask twelve well-known composition theorists to create detailed syllabi for a first-year composition course and then to explain their theoretical foundations. Each contributor to First-Year Composition: From Theory to Practice, discusses the major goals and objectives for their course, its major assignments, their use of outside texts, the role of reading and responding to these texts, the nature of classroom discussion, their methods of responding to student writing, and their assessment methods.

The contributors to First-Year Composition: From Theory to Practice include Chris Anson, Suresh Canagarajah, Douglas Hesse, Asao Inoue, Paula Mathieu, Teresa Redd, Alexander Reid, Jody, Shipka, Howard Tinberg, Victor Villanueva, Elizabeth Wardle and Doug Downs, and Kathleen Blake Yancey. Their twelve essays provide a window into these teachers’ classrooms that will help readers, teachers, and writing program administrators appreciate the strengths of unity and diversity in rhetoric and composition as a field. The examples will empower new and experienced teachers and administrators. The editors frame the twelve essays with an introductory chapter that identifies key moments in composition’s history and a concluding chapter that highlights the varied and useful ways the contributors approach the common challenges of the first-year composition course.

About the Editors

Deborah Coxwell-Teague currently serves as director of Florida State University’s First-Year Composition Program. In this capacity, she is involved in the training and supervision of close to 150 individuals who teach approximately 350 sections of FYC annually. She has also served as director of FSU’s Reading/Writing Center and has taught composition at both the high school and community college levels. Deborah’s research interests focus on teacher training and composition. Her publications include Finding Our Way: A Writing Teacher’s Sourcebook, coauthored with the late Wendy Bishop, and Multiple Literacies, a composition textbook coauthored with Dan Melzer.

Ronald F. Lunsford is Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where he teaches courses in composition theory, rhetoric, and linguistics. His administrative posts include Director of Rhetoric and Writing at Clemson University, Head of the Department of English at Missouri State University, Chair of English, Assistant to the Provost, and Director of Graduate Programs in English—all at UNC Charlotte. His publications include the following co-authored works: Twelve Readers Reading: Responding to College Student Writing, Noam Chomsky, Research in Composition and Rhetoric, Linguistic Perspectives on Literature, and The Longwood Guide to Writing, now in its fourth edition.

Contents

Preface
Setting the Table: Composition in the Last Half of the Twentieth Century
Deborah Coxwell-Teague and Ronald F. Lunsford

1 Writing, Language, and Literacy
Chris M. Anson

2 ESL Composition as a Literate Art of the Contact Zone
Suresh Canagarajah

3 Occasions, Sources, and Strategies
Douglas Hesse

4 A Grade-Less Writing Course That Focuses on Labor and Assessing
Asao B. Inoue

5 A Guiding Question, Some Primary Research, and a Dash of Rhetorical Awareness
Paula Mathieu

6 “Talkin bout Fire Don’t Boil the Pot”: Putting Theory into Practice in a First-Year Writing Course at an HBCU
Teresa Redd

7 The Activity of Writing: Affinity and Affect in Composition
Alexander Reid

8 Beyond Text and Talk: A Multimodal Approach to First-Year Composition
Jody Shipka

9 Working Through Theory in a Community College Composition Classroom
Howard Tinberg

10 For the Love of Language: A Curriculum
Victor Villanueva

11 Looking into Writing-about-Writing Classrooms
Elizabeth Wardle and Doug Downs

12 Attempting the Impossible: Designing a First-Year Composition Course
Kathleen Blake Yancey

13 A Cornucopia of Composition Theories: What These Teachers Tell Us About Our Discipline
Deborah Coxwell-Teague and Ronald F. Lunsford

Contributors
Index

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Florida

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-544-6

Edited by Jeff Rice

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-544-6 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-545-3 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-546-0 (PDF, $20) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 314 pages with 75 illustrations, bibliographies, and index.

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Description

Florida proposes Florida as a nexus of various contested moments, ideas, concepts, and relations. In the age of networks, it is not enough to only think of computerized, economic, or labor intensive systems as networks. As Bruno Latour writes, networks are represented in ways other than graphic visualizations or visualizations of spokes and connections. Spaces, too, are networks, and specific spaces, such as Florida, are networks in need of exploring and understanding so that we better understand how politics, ideology, economics, race, and other moments come into being and affect each other within the representations we circulate. Editor Jeff Rice and contributors argue that we need to rethink taxonomies of spaces, moving from static entities to shifting networks of meaning. Contributors demonstrate how Florida is a space for composing and inventing fresh responses that traditional images and representations of Florida do not provoke. They explore the intersection of various Florida moments to trace the ways spaces can be written, and the compositional space of Florida, broadened. Contributors include James P. Beasley, Cassandra  Branham, Lillie Anne Brown, Bradley Dilger, Sidney I. Dobrin, David M. Grant, Charlie Hailey, Megan McIntyre, Lauren Mitchell, Sean Morey, Steve Newman, Jeff Rice, Craig Saper, Todd Taylor, Adam Trowbridge, Gregory L. Ulmer, and Jessica Westbrook.

About the Editor

Jeff Rice is the Martha B. Reynolds Professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky. He is the author of The Rhetoric of Cool: Composition Studies and New Media and Digital Detroit: Rhetoric and Space in the Age of the Network. His work has appeared in numerous journals and edited collections. He specializes in new media, rhetorics of space, pedagogy, rhetoric, and writing studies.

Contents

Acknowledgments
1 Introduction
Florida Patterns
2 "A Network of Bones: Key West as Underworld," Sean Morey
3 "Miami Spatial Stories," Jeff Rice
4 "Florida Trouse," Charlie Hailey
Florida Narratives
5 "Tampa at the Sunset of Western Civilization," Todd Taylor
6 "Assembling New Port Richey, Florida," Cassandra Branham and Megan McIntyre
7 "Ferris Wheels, Concertos, Sidewalks and Sassy Tongues: Negotiating Racial Performances in the Capital City," Lillie Anne Brown
8 "Sort of on The Grid: An Eccentric Map of Growing Up Jewish in the Miami Suburbs, ca. 1975–85," Steve Newman
Florida Studies
9 "West Palm" Bradley Dilger
10 "The Spectator, the Spectacle, and the Spectral at the Stadium Course at the Tournament Players Club, Ponte Vedra Beach," James P. Beasley
11 "Shell Games: Tracking Place Through Non-Place," David M. Grant
12 "An American Beach," Sidney I. Dobrin
Florida Theory
13 "EPCOT: Florida's Disney-psychosis Dreams Foreclosed," Craig Saper, Adam Trowbridge, and Jessica Westbrook (Channel Two)
14 "Orlando, Florida's Ubiquitous Libidinal Boxes," Lauren Mitchell
15  "Murphy's Well Being: The Konsult," Gregory L. Ulmer

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Foreign Language Writing Instruction: Principles and Practices

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-224-7

Edited by Tony Cimasko and Melinda Reichelt

Second Language Writing
Series Editor, Paul Kei Matsuda

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-224-7 (paperback, $32; £21; $32 CAD; €24; $32 AUD). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 359 pages, with illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index.

Other Formats Available: 978-1-60235-225-4 (hardcover; $60; £38; $58 CAD;  €43; $58 AUD); 978-1-60235-226-1 (Adobe ebook on CD; $20; £14; $21 CAD;  €15; $21 AUD).

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Description

Much of what is known about teaching second language writing today has been based on research in English as a second language, writing in English in English-dominant countries and other contexts, without giving close consideration to the important work of teaching foreign language writing in many languages and contexts around the world. Foreign Language Writing Instruction: Principles and Practices takes a significant step in addressing this imbalance by examining many of the topics that influence foreign language teaching. Fourteen chapters researched and authored by scholars working in nine different countries and regions explore the contexts of foreign language writing pedagogy, the diversity of national and regional approaches, the role of universities, departments, and programs in pedagogy, and the cognitive and classroom dimensions of teaching and learning. This volume provides a cross-section of the current status of foreign language writing instruction, while developing a fuller appreciation for the broadened perspectives that it can bring to second language writing. Both teachers and researchers in foreign language writing will benefit greatly from this collection.

Contributors include Rachida Elqobai, Yukiko Abe Hatasa, Icy Lee, Natalie Lefkowitz, Rosa Manchón, Hui-Tzu Min, Marly Nas, Hadara Perpignan, Melinda Reichelt, Marcela Ruiz-Funes, Jean Marie Schultz, Oleg Tarnopolsky, Helga Thorson, Kees van Esch, and Wenyu Wang.

About the Editors

Tony Cimasko is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His work has been published in the Journal of Second Language Writing, Computers and Composition, English for Specific Purposes, and the online edition of What Is “College -Level” Writing? Volume 2.

Melinda Reichelt is Professor of English at the University of Toledo. She has published her work in the Journal of Second Language Writing, World Englishes, Composition Studies, Issues in Writing, the ELT Journal, Modern Language Journal, the International Journal of English Studies, College ESL, Foreign Language Annals, the WAC Journal, English Today, and International Education.

Contents

Introduction

The State of Foreign Language Writing Studies
Melinda Reichelt, “Foreign Language Writing: An Overview”
Marcela Ruiz-Funes, “Reading to Write in a Foreign Language: Cognition and Task Representation”
Rosa Manchón, “The Language Learning Potential of Writing in Foreign Language Contexts: Lessons from Research”
Jean Marie Schultz, “Second Language Writing in the Era of Globalization”

National and Regional Profiles of Foreign Language Writing Instruction
Rachida Elqobai, “EFL in the Moroccan Educational System: The Whys and Hows”
Yukiko Abe Hatasa, “L2 Writing Instruction in Japanese as a Foreign Language”
Icy Lee, “Issues and Challenges in Teaching and Learning EFL Writing: The Case of Hong Kong”

Foreign Language Programs
Hadara Perpignan, “Ideas into Words: Narrowing the Gap in Doctoral Candidates’ Academic Writing in EFL”
Hui-Tzu Min, “A Principled Eclectic Approach to Teaching EFL Writing in Taiwan”
Oleg Tarnopolsky, “Teaching English Writing in Ukraine: Principles and Practices”
Marly Nas & Kees van Esch, “Writing in Spanish as a FL in Nijmegen: In Search of a Balance”

Pedagogical Concerns
Natalie Lefkowitz, “The Quest for Grammatical Accuracy: Writing Instruction among Foreign and Heritage Language Educators”
Helga Thorson, “Student Perceptions of Writing as a Tool for Increasing Oral Proficiency in German”
Wenyu Wang, “Teaching Academic Writing to Advanced EFL Learners in China: Principles and Challenges”

Afterword
Contributors
Index
About the Editors

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Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction

$50.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-665-8

Edited by Beth L. Hewett and Kevin Eric DePew

Perspectives on Writing
Series Editor, Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-665-8 (paperback, $50); 978-1-60235-666-5 (hardcover, $100); 978-1-60235-667-2 (pdf, $20) © 2015 by Beth L. Hewett and Kevin Eric DePew. 601 pages with illustrations, bibliographies, and index.

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Description

Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction (OWI) addresses the questions and decisions that administrators and instructors most need to consider when developing online writing programs and courses. Written by experts in the field (members of the Conference on College Composition and Communication Committee for Effective Practices in OWI and other experts and stakeholders), the authors, explain the foundations of the recently published (2013) “A Position Statement of Principles and Examples Effective Practices for OWI” and provide illustrative practical applications. To that end, in every chapter, the authors uniquely address issues of inclusive and accessible writing instruction (based upon physical and mental disability, linguistic ability, and socioeconomic challenges) in technology enhanced settings. The five parts of this book attempt to cover the most key issues relevant to principle-centered OWI: (1) An OWI Primer, (2) OWI Pedagogy and Administrative Decisions, (3) Practicing Inclusivity in OWI, (4) Faculty and Student Preparation for OWI, and (5) New Directions in OWI. The editors believe that the field of writing studies is on a trajectory in which most courses will be mediated online to various degrees; therefore the principles detailed in this collection may become the basis for future writing instruction practices.  To this end, the editors hope that the guidance provided in the final two chapters, the questions that the previous sixteen chapters raise, and the desire to apply foundational practices for OWI in one’s own context will encourage readers to join this conversation by designing practices, contributing to the data about OWI, and reshaping its theory.

About the Editors

Beth L. Hewett is a key leader of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) Committee for Effective Practices in Online Writing Instruction. A college-level educational consultant and writing instructor, Hewett is the author, coauthor, and coeditor of multiple articles and books, to include Reading to Learn and Writing to Teach: Literacy Strategies for Online Writing Instruction, The Online Writing Conference: A Guide for Teachers and Tutors, Preparing Educators for Online Writing Instruction: Principles and Practices, Virtual Collaborative Writing in the Workplace: Computer-Mediated Communication Technologies and Practices, and Technology and English Studies: Innovative Professional Paths.

Kevin Eric DePew is an Associate Professor and the Graduate Program Director of Old Dominion University’s English Ph.D. program, which has an online component. He has authored and co-authored works about OWI in Computers and Composition, as well as the Handbook of Research on Computer Mediated Communication and Emerging Pedagogies in the Networked Knowledge Society.

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Future Texts: Subversive Performance and Feminist Bodies

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-767-9

Edited by Vicki Callahan and Virginia Kuhn

Electracy and Transmedia Studies
Edited by Jan Rune Holmevik and Cynthia Haynes

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-767-9 (paperback, $30.00) 978-1-60235-768-6 (hardcover, $60.00) 978-1-60235-769-3 (Adobe eBook, $20) © 2016 by Parlor Press, with illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index. 185 pages.

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Description

Future Texts: Subversive Performance and Feminist Bodies sketches several possibilities for future texts, those that imagine new pathways through the forms used to express contemporary questions of race, gender, and identity. Future Texts: Subversive Performance and Feminist Bodies’ area of investigation is situated within popular culture, not as a place of critique or celebration, but rather as a contested site that crosses an array of media forms, from music video, to games, to global journalism. While there is an established tradition in feminist writing founded on experimental expression that disrupts patriarchal culture, it has too often failed to consider issues of race and class. This is evident in the dilemma faced by black feminists who, alienated from dominant feminism’s failure to consider their experience, have been forced to choose whether they were black or women first. To push back against such identity splintering, Future Texts: Subversive Performance and Feminist Bodies begins with the politics and aesthetics of Afrofuturism, which sets the stage for the dialogue around contemporary feminism that runs through the collection. With a paradigm of remix as linguistic play and reconfiguration, the chapters confront the question of narrative codes and conventions. These new formats are crucial to rewriting the relationship between hegemonic and resistant texts.

Praise for Future Texts

Future Texts offers fresh and exciting work by a range of inspiring contributors on the cultural possibilities of Afrofuturism and new media. In these polyvocal essays, the concerns of race, gender and identity are reimagined, expanded, and revitalized, demonstrating (anew) the contemporary relevance of feminist engagement with popular cultural forms. —ANNE BALSAMO

About the Editors

Vicki Callahan is Associate Professor in the Division of Media Arts + Practice in the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California. She is a recipient of a Fulbright Scholar Award to Ireland for 2015. She teaches courses focused on the integration of theory and practice with attention to issues of media history and theory, digital culture, social media + remix, transmedia, and media strategies for social change. She is author of Zones of Anxiety: Movement, Musidora, and the Crime Serials of Louis Feuillade (Wayne State University Press 2005) and editor for the collection, Reclaiming the Archive: Feminism and Film History (Washington State University Press 2010). Her essays on feminist history and theory appear in the journals Camera Obscura, Cinema Journal, Velvet Light Trap, and Sight and Sound. She is working on a monograph on the silent film star, Mabel Normand. Founder of the Feminism 3.0 website and co-founder of the Transmedia Activism site, she also works with Sarah Atkinson on the Transmedia Database Project, a scholarly resource site for cross-platform storytelling.

Virginia Kuhn is Associate Professor in the Division of Media Arts + Practice, and Associate Director of the Institute for Multimedia Literacy in the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California. Her work centers on digital rhetoric and visual culture and her current research project, the VAT (video analysis tableau), applies computational analysis to the study of vast video archives. In 2005 she successfully defended one of the first born-digital dissertations in the US, titled Ways of Composing: Visual Literacy in the Digital Age, which challenged archiving and copyright conventions, and published the first article composed in the digital platform, Scalar, titled “Filmic Texts and the Rise of the Fifth Estate.” She recently edited her second peer-reviewed digital anthology, MoMLA: From Gallery to Webtext, and is now working on a monograph. Her work can be found in a variety of print and digital journals and serves on the editorial boards of several journals.

Contents and Contributors

Acknowledgments
1 Introduction by Vicki Callahan and Virginia Kuhn

Part 1: Afrofuturism in Popular Culture
2 The New "Material Girls": Madonna, "Millenial" Pop Divas, and the Politics of Race and Gender by Shelleen Greene

3 A Window Seat to History: Erykah Badu's Dealey Plaza Remix by Vicki Callahan

4 The Possibilities of Liminality: Black Women's Future Texts as Productive Chaos by Nina Cartier

5 Re-Creating Niobe: The Construction and Re-Construction of Black Femininity through Games and the Social Psychology of the Avatar by Nettrice R. Gaskins

6 "Ghana Meets the World": Remixing Popular Culture on OMG! Ghana by Lorien R. Hunter

Part 2: Feminist Disruptions of Gender and Narrative Codes
7 Adapting Lisbeth for Hollywood: The Politics and Franchising Practices behind Sony's GWTDT Reboot by Courtney Brannon Donoghue

8 Recasting The Best Years of Our Lives: Gender, Revision, and Military Women in the Veteran's Homecoming Film by Anna Froula

9 Television's Queer Future? The Possibilities and Limitations of Web Series, Digital Distribution, and LGBT Representation in Husbands by Melanie E. S. Kohnen

10 Sucker Punch and the Aesthetics of Denial: Future Perfect Tense by Virginia Kuhn

Contributors
About the Editors
Index

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Price: $30.00

GenAdmin: Theorizing WPA Identities in the Twenty-First Century

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-236-0

Colin Charlton, Jonikka Charlton, Tarez Samra Graban, Kathleen J. Ryan, and Amy Ferdinandt Stolley

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-236-0 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-237-7 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-238-4 (Adobe ebook on CD, $18). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 266 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

GenAdmin: Theorizing WPA Identities in the Twenty-First Century examines identity formation in a generation of rhetoric and composition professionals who have had explicit preparation in scholarly dimensions of writing program work. GenAdmin disrupts histories and narratives that posit writing program administration as managerial, where the most one can hope for is to become a hero who successfully champions writing rather than a victim of an untenable job. The authors draw on composition and rhetorical theory, WPA experiences and scholarship, and contemporary philosophy to offer writing program administration as an epistemology and a discourse for change. GenAdmin repositions WPAs as agents and reclaims writing program administration as a positive professional commitment that looks toward, rather than simply stems from, current challenges in higher education. An Afterword by Jeanne Gunner, Joseph Harris, Dennis Lynch, and Martha Townsend continues the important conversation, setting the stage for future discussion of the issues raised in this groundbreaking account of a new generation of writing program administrators.

What People Are Saying . . .

GenAdmin: Theorizing WPA Identities in the Twenty-First Century makes an important contribution to writing studies in general by showing how the identification of writing program administration as scholarly and creative (not merely administrative) invites new ways to think about and theorize composition’s place in the field and in institutional structures. GenAdmin also contributes to WPA scholarship by opening a rich and textured discussion of a very specific moment in which WPA work becomes a focus for graduate studies in the field. . . . GenAdmin speaks with equal importance to junior and senior WPAs, to the people who train graduate students for WPA work, and to those who hire new WPAs.

—Nancy C. DeJoy, Michigan State University

About the Authors

Colin Charlton is Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Composition and coordinator of developmental reading/writing at the University of Texas-Pan American. Jonikka Charlton is Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Composition and coordinator of first-year writing at the University of Texas-Pan American. Tarez Samra Graban is Assistant Professor of English and coordinator of multilingual writing at Indiana University. Kathleen J. Ryan is Associate Professor of English and Director of Composition at the University of Montana. Amy Ferdinandt Stolley is Assistant Professor of English and Writing Program Director at Saint Xavier University.

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Price: $30.00

Genre: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-170-7

Anis S. Bawarshi and Mary Jo Reiff

Genre coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-170-7 (paperback, $30.00; £21; $32 CAD; €24; $35 AUD); © 2010 by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse. 277 pages, with glossary, bibliographies, illustrations, and index.

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-171-4 (hardcover, $60.00; £42; $64 CAD; €48; $70 AUD); 978-1-60235-172-1 (Adobe eBook; $16.00; £12; $18 CAD; €13; $19 AUD); also available at the WAC Clearinghouse: http://wac.colostate.edu/

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Genre FlyerDownload the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format).


Description

Genre: an Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy provides a critical overview of the rich body of scholarship that has informed a “genre turn” in Rhetoric and Composition, including a range of interdisciplinary perspectives from rhetorical theory, applied linguistics, sociology, philosophy, cognitive psychology, and literary theory.  The book presents an historical overview of genre; describes key issues and theories that have led to the reconceptualization of genre over the last thirty years; examines current research and lines of development in the study of genre; provides examples of various methodologies for conducting genre research; and explores the possibilities and implications for using genre to teach writing at various levels and within different disciplines. While the book examines various traditions that have shaped the field’s understanding of and approaches to genre, what connects these various approaches is a commitment to the idea that genres reflect and coordinate social ways of knowing and acting in the world and thus provide valuable means of researching how texts function in various contexts and teaching students how to act meaningfully in multiple contexts.

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition Logo

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Charles Bazerman
Published jointly by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse

About the Authors

Anis Bawarshi is Associate professor of English and Director of the Expository Writing Program at the University of Washington and author of Genre and the Invention of the Writer: Reconsidering the Place of Invention in Composition (2003); Scenes of Writing: Strategies for Composing with Genres (2004; with Amy Devitt and Mary Jo Reiff); A Closer Look: A Writer’s Reader (2003; with Sidney I. Dobrin).

Mary Jo Reiff is Associate Professor of English at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville and author of Approaches to Audience: An Overview of the Major Perspectives (2004), co-author (with Amy Devitt and Anis Bawarshi)  of Scenes of Writing: Strategies for Composing with Genres (2004), and co-editor (with Kirsten Benson) of Rhetoric of Inquiry (2009).

Contents

Series Editor’s Preface, Charles Bazerman
Acknowledgments

1 Introduction and Overview

Part 1: Historical Review and Theories of Genre
2 Genre in Literary Traditions
3 Genre in Linguistic Traditions: Systemic Functional and Corpus Linguistics
4 Genre in Linguistic Traditions: English for Specific Purposes
5 Genre in Rhetorical and Sociological Traditions
6 Rhetorical Genre Studies

Part 2: Genre Research in Multiple Contexts
7 Genre Research in Academic Contexts
8 Genre Research in Workplace and Professional Contexts
9 Genre Research in Public and New Media Contexts

Part 3: Genre Approaches to Teaching Writing
10 From Research to Pedagogy: Multiple Pedagogical Approaches to Teaching Genres
11 Rhetorical Genre Studies Approaches to Teaching Writing

Glossary, Melanie Kill
Annotated Bibliography, Melanie Kill
Notes
Works Cited
Index
About the Authors

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Go On

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-796-9

Ethel Rackin

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-796-9 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-797-6 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 70 pages, in English.

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Reviews

Description

The miniature poems that comprise Go On, Ethel Rackin's second collection, constitute distilled moments in time that paradoxically extend our field of concentration and vision. Focusing on various kinds of survival—personal, political, environmental—Go On asks what it means to endure in unsure times. By turns collaged, diaristic, and panoramic, the poems that make up this collection combine to form a kind of crazy-quilt of lyric association and connection.

What People Are Saying

Ethel Rackin’s Go On immediately calls to mind Beckett’s ‘in the silence you don’t know, you must go on, I can’t go on, I’ll go on,’ and out of that silence come these brief and powerful poems written ‘after centuries of loss/ in the last century.’ A visionary, Rackin’s preoccupations are seeing and its impossibility. Time is both full of historical weight and the mysterious present, ‘as if the before and after had frozen/ and couldn’t be tracked down.’ Quiet, sure, possessed of a subtle, winning tenderness, and often most at home in the quotidian, the poems dart among truths that startle: ‘before I could tell another’s lie I was lying in it,’ and ‘The grief you imagine/ is easier than the grief you actually/ have to live through.’ These are poems of our time. One marvels at their existence. Carefully, slowly, they carve a path of just how we might go on.—Gillian Conoley

Recognition is the portal to entity and to something very like godliness. The gentle imperatives of Ethel Rackin’s new poems urge us to sustain a longing for ‘the face of recognition’ and for the resulting entities—all of them wild, all of them free—that fulfill it.—Donald Revell

I am deeply moved by Ethel Rackin’s lyric poems. They continue the great tradition started in China on the one hand and Africa on the other, come together now in Pennsylvania at Rackin’s kitchen table.—Gerald Stern

Go On directs us to notice and to know the world with perfect vulnerability. The delights and difficulties trickling through the chinks of ordinary time swirl through these deceptively simple verses that, like Blake’s, hum with the certainty of divine presence always near us but nearly always beyond comprehension. Rackin’s expert development of the lyric’s oldest properties carries forth the unpredictable relationship between human awareness and the visible world through “elemental shifts” of spare, simple words that glimpse the unseen and touch its consciousness. “It’s not supposed to make sense,” these graceful poems inform us, but our responsibility lies in baring ourselves emotionally and intellectually to others and the world as we make and find it. Only in this state of exposure, “shirt open/ chest full of birds,” do we gather the often fleeting, sometimes lasting rewards of hope and faith.—Elizabeth Savage

About the Poet

Ethel Rackin is the author of a previous collection of poems, The Forever Notes, published by Parlor Press in 2013. Her poems, book reviews, and collaborations have appeared in journals such as Colorado Review, Hotel Amerika, Jacket2, Kenyon Review, Verse Daily, and Volt. She earned her MFA from Bard College and her PhD in English Literature from Princeton University. She is currently an associate professor at Bucks County Community College in Pennsylvania.

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Graduate Studies in Second Language Writing

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-713-6

Edited by Kyle McIntosh, Carolina Pelaez-Morales, and Tony Silva

Second Language Writing
Series Editor, Paul Kei Matsuda

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-713-6 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-714-3 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-715-0 (PDF, $20). © 2016 by Parlor Press. 216 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Graduate Studies in Second Language Writing advances scholarship on graduate study and professionalization in the field of second language writing by addressing the ways in which an array of processes and personal interactions shape the experiences of those who are entering the field, as well as those who provide them with guidance and support. By pairing several noted scholars with their former mentees, now established scholars in their own right, Graduate Studies in Second Language Writing takes select insights gained from that conversation and makes them available to a wider audience, including current graduate students in L2 writing and those looking to enter the field, as well as faculty advisors and university administrators involved in such programs. The chapters in this collection explore the intersections between personal, professional, and institutional demands of graduate study in L2 writing, highlighting the constant negotiation that occurs at different stages in one’s academic career. The contributors to Graduate Studies in Second Language Writing graciously offer their experiences with graduate study in L2 writing and recommendations for navigating its sweeping landscape to help current and future students to find their way to becoming part of the larger disciplinary community.

About the Editors

Kyle McIntosh is Assistant Professor of English and Writing at the University of Tampa, where he teaches ESL Writing, First-Year Writing, and TESOL courses. He has published articles, chapters, and book reviews in the Asian Journal of English Language Teaching, Critical Inquiry in Language Study, The Journal of English for Academic Purposes, and The Companion to Language Assessment.

Carolina Pelaez-Morales is Assistant Professor of Writing & TESOL at Columbus State University, where she teaches courses in TESOL and First-Year Composition and helps coordinate a TESOL certificate and an ESOL endorsement program. Her most recent research article was published by TESOL press, but her research has also appeared in Critical Inquiry in Language Studies and INTESOL Journal.

Tony Silva directs the Graduate Program in Second Language Studies/ESL in the Department of English at Purdue University, where he teaches graduate courses for PhD, MA, and Certificate students and writing support courses for graduate and undergraduate international students. He has authored, co-authored, or co-edited numerous books and articles and is currently a member of the TESOL Board of Directors.

Contents

Acknowledgments

1 Introduction by Kyle McIntosh, Carolina Pelaez-Morales, and Tony Silva
2 "Second Language Writing Dissertations at Doctoral Level Universities: The Case of Indiana University of Pennsylvania" by Dan J. Tannacito
3 "On My Initiation into the Field of Second Language Writing" by Karen A. Power
4 "Doctoring Yourself: Seven Steps" by Alister Cumming
5 "Doctoring Myself: Observation, Interaction, and Action" by Luxin Yang
6 "The Will to Build: Mentoring Doctoral Students in Second Language Writing" Paul Kei Matsuda
7 "Choices in Identity Building as an L2 Writing Specialist: Investment and Perseverance" Tanita Saenkhum
8 "From Doctoral Education to the Tenure Track: Lessons and Observations from the Journey" by Christina Ortmeier-Hooper
9 "The PhD Process as Activity" by Wei Zhu
10 "The PhD Process as Growing in a Community" by Iona Sarieva
11 "Knowledge Consumer to Knowledge Producer: Preliminary Exams and the Prospectus (A Dialogue)" by Tony Cimasko and Tony Silva

Contributors
About the Editors.
Index

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Grasshoppers' Eyes

$14.99
SKU: 978-1-60235-942-0

Poems by Ko Hyeong-Ryeol

Translated by Brother Anthony of Taizé and Lee Hyung-Jin

Published with the support of the Literature Translation Institute of Korea (LTI Korea)

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-942-0 (paperback, $14.99); 978-1-60235-943-7 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 134 pages.

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Description

The poems of Ko Hyeong-Ryeol are mostly inspired by the landscapes and cityscapes of Korea, occasionally echoing journeys to other lands. The poet allows his memories and imagination free reign so that his poems escape from the limits of naturalistic description and invite the reader to sense both the interrelatedness and the impermanence of all things. Many poems are reflections of the Buddhist sense of unreality, the discontinuity of time and matter. Ko Hyeong-ryeol grew up in the shadow of Mount Seorak, a wild, rocky mountain in the East of Korea, and many poems return to it. These translations make his work available in English for the first time.

About the Author

KO HYEONG-RYEOL was born in 1954 in Sokcho, Gangwon-do, on the East coast of Korea just south of the DMZ, at the foot of Mount Seorak. In 1985 he began to work as editor-in-chief responsible for poetry in the Changbi publishing company, a position he held for some twenty years before retiring in 2005. He now lives in Yangpyeong, to the east of Seoul.

About the Translators

BROTHER ANTHONY OF TAIZÉ has lived in Korea since 1980. He taught English literature in Sogang University, Seoul, for more than twenty years. He has published over forty volumes of Korean poetry in English translation, including ten volumes of work by Ko Un and Fifteen Seconds Without Sorrow by Shim Bo-Seon (Parlor Press, 2016). He was recently awarded an MBE by Queen Elizabeth.

LEE HYUNG-JIN received his doctorate in comparative literature at Penn State University and is a professor of translation studies in the School of English at Sookmyung Women's University, in Seoul. His translations of Korean poetry with Brother Anthony include Walking on a Washing Line: Poems of Kim Seung-hee.

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Greek Rhetoric Before Aristotle 2e

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-212-4

Revised and Expanded 2nd Edition
Richard Leo Enos

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Catherine Hobbs, Patricia Sullivan, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-212-4 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-213-1 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-214-8 (Adobe eBook; $20). © 2012 by Parlor Press. 300 pages, with illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Recent archaeological discoveries, coupled with long-lost but now available epigraphical evidence, and a more expansive view of literary sources, provide new and dramatic evidence of the emergence of rhetoric in ancient Greece. Many of these artifacts, gathered through onsite fieldwork in Greece, are analyzed in this revised and expanded edition of Greek Rhetoric Before Aristotle. This new evidence, along with recent developments in research methods and analysis, reveal clearly that long before Aristotle’s Rhetoric, long before rhetoric was even stabilized into formal systems of study in Classical Athens, nascent, pre-disciplinary “rhetorics” were emerging throughout Greece. These newly acquired resources and research procedures demonstrate that oral and literate rhetoric emerged not only because of intellectual developments and the refinement of technologies that facilitated communication but also because of social, political and cultural forces that nurtured rhetoric’s growth and popularity throughout the Hellenic world. Greek Rhetoric Before Aristotle offers insights into the mentalities forming and driving expression, revealing, in turn, a great deal more about the relationship of thought and expression in Antiquity. A more expansive understanding of these pre-disciplinary manifestations of rhetoric, in all of their varied forms, enriches the history and the nature of classical rhetoric as a formalized discipline.

About the Author

Richard Leo Enos is Professor and holder of the Lillian Radford Chair of Rhetoric and Composition at Texas Christian University. His research concentration is in classical rhetoric with an emphasis in the relationship between oral and written discourse. He is past president of the American Society for the History of Rhetoric (1980–1981) and the Rhetoric Society of America (1990–1991). He received the RSA George E. Yoos Award Distinguished Service and was inducted as an RSA Fellow in 2006. He is the founding editor of Advances in the History of Rhetoric and the editor (with David E. Beard) of Advances in the History of Rhetoric: The First Six Years (2007, Parlor Press). He is also the author of Roman Rhetoric: Revolution and the Greek Influence, Revised and Expanded Edition (2008, Parlor Press).

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Haptic Visions: Rhetorics of the Digital Image, Information, and Nanotechnology

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-550-7

Valerie L. Hanson

Visual Rhetoric
Series Editor: Marguerite Helmers

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-550-7 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-551-4 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-552-1 (PDF, $20) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 226 pages with illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index.

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What People Are Saying . . .

"In Haptic Visions, Valerie Hanson provides a careful and far-reaching study of the discourses and practices of nanotechnology, but its implications are not limited to the case example at hand, which is fascinating in its own right and deserves to be read by students and researchers who are interested in the rhetorical dynamics of science. Hanson's original and insightful analysis of the contexts surrounding the scanning tunneling microscope also opens new ways of thinking about visuals, about visual production and reception, and about the role of persuasion in scientific knowledge-making. This book is a must-read for anyone with interests in the overlapping areas of rhetoric, science, and the visual." —Stuart Selber, The Pennsylvania State University

"We see by touching, we touch by seeing. This used to be true only metaphorically. Nanotechnology and other contemporary technosciences produce knowledge and employ instruments that render touch visible, literally. Valerie Hanson's Haptic Visions: Rhetorics of the Digital Image, Information, and Nanotechnology explores the new ways of relating ourselves to the world and participating in what we observe. Original in its approach and insightful in its analysis, Haptic Visions forges new connections between rhetoric, visual culture studies, and the philosophy of technoscience." —Alfred Nordmann, Institut für Philosophie,Technische Universität Darmstadt and the University of South Carolina.

"Valerie Hanson scans the nooks and crannies of the human scale language and images with which nanoscale science has begun to translate an extraordinarily small, strange, and promising new point of view on matter and energy. The result is a tour de force analysis of the rhetorical layer of nanoscience. Haptic Visions is a must read users' guide for understanding the emerging but often invisible nanoscale  technological revolution that will transform our planet in ways that we literally cannot envision." —Richard Doyle, The Pennsylvania State University

About the Author

Valerie Hanson is Associate Professor of Writing in the School of Liberal Arts at Philadelphia University.  Her research focuses on the rhetoric of science and design. She has published articles on the rhetoric of nanotechnology in journals such as Science Communication and Science as Culture. She has been a fellow in an interdisciplinary research group at the Zentrum für interdisziplinäre Forschung (Center for Interdisciplinary Research) at the University of Bielefeld (Germany)

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Imaging and Imagining Science in the Information Age
1 Imaging Atoms, Imagining Information: Rhetorical Dynamics of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope
2 Camera Haptica: Blindness, Histories, and Productions of Haptic Vision
3 Haptical Consistency: Emerging Conventions of the STM Image-Interface
4 Visual Intelligence: Reading the Rhetorical Work of STM Images in Tropes
5 Conclusion—Haptic Visions of Science and Rhetoric: Interaction and Its Implications
Notes
Works Cited
Index
About the Author

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Humanistic Critique of Education: Teaching and Learning as Symbolic Action

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-157-8

Edited by Peter M. Smudde

The Wabash Trilogy coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-157-8 (paperback; $30.00; £20; €23; $35 AUD; $33 CAD); 978-1-60235-158-5 (hardcover, $60.00; £40; €46; $70 AUD; $66 CAD); 978-1-60235-159-2 (Adobe eBook on CD, $20.00; £14; €16) © 2010 by Parlor Press. 268 pages with notes, bibliography, illustrations, and index.

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Description

Humanistic Critique of Education’s ten essays by noted scholars address the subject of educational policy, methods, ideology and more, with stress upon the rhetoric of contemporary teaching and learning. Humanistic Critique of Education focuses on education as symbolic action, as the foundation of discovery and, thus, as “equipment for living” in Kenneth Burke’s terms. These essays will spark dialogue about improving education in democratic societies through the lens of humanism.

The authors take their lead from Burke’s famous essay, “Linguistic Approach to Problems of Education,” which is included in the volume, and thus address the design, practice, and outcomes of educational programs in the new millennium. Key subjects include cognitive motivational outcomes, student development, literacy, active learning, constructivism, problem-based learning, cooperative educational movements, learning communities, student retention, community responsibility and service learning, technology, curriculum development, and more. Humanistic Critique of Education is the first sustained attempt to apply Burke’s profound insights to the problems of educational reform and policy. Contributors include Peter Smudde, Bernard L. Brock, Kenneth Burke, Andrew King, Elvera Berry, Mark E. Huglen, Rachel McCoppin, Richard H. Thames, James F. Klumpp, Erica J. Lamm, Robert Wess, Bryan Crable, and David Cratis Williams.

Peter M. Smudde (PhD, Wayne State University) is assistant professor in the School of Communication at Illinois State University. He came to academe in 2002 after sixteen years in industry in the fields of public relations, marketing communications, and technical writing. His primary research and teaching interest is the application of Burke’s ideas and contemporary theories of rhetoric to pedagogy and industry.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: A Prelude to Critique
Peter M. Smudde and Bernard L. Brock

1 Linguistic Approach to Problems of Education
Kenneth Burke

2 Kenneth Burke as Teacher: Pedagogy, Materialism, and Power
Andrew King

3 The Both-And of Undergraduate Education: Burke’s “Linguistic” Approach
Elvera Berry

4 The Education of Citizen Critics: The Consubstantiality of Burke’s Philosophy and Constructivist Pedagogy
Peter M. Smudde

5 Extending Kenneth Burke and Multicultural Education: Being Actively Revised by the Other
Mark E. Huglen and Rachel McCoppin

6 Preaching What We Practice: Course Design Based on the Psychology of Form
Richard H. Thames

7 Motives and Metaphors of Education
James F. Klumpp and Erica J. Lamm

8 A Burkeian Approach to Education in a Time of Ecological Crisis
Robert Wess

8 “By and Through Language, Beyond Language”: Envisioning a Burkeian Curriculum
Bryan Crable

10 Educational Trajectories for Open and Democratic Societies: Kenneth Burke’s “Linguistic Approach”
David Cratis Williams

Contributors
Index

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Price: $30.00

Instances: Selected Poems

$18.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-234-6

Jeongrye Choi

Translated by Brenda Hillman, Wayne de Fremery and Jeongrye Choi

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-234-6 (paperback, $18; £13; $18 CAD; €14; $18 AUS); 978-1-60235-235-3 (Adobe ebook; $14; £9; $14 CAD; €11; $14 AUS) © 2011 by Parlor Press. 145 pages, in English and Korean.

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Reviews

"Jeongrye Choi's Instances." The Iowa Review (Feb. 2012).

Though Jeongrye Choi is the author of four books of poetry in her native South Korea, her work has been largely unavailable to American audiences; however, with Instances, a translation of Choi’s selected poems by Brenda Hillman, Wayne De Fremery, and Jeongrye Choi herself, English readers now have the opportunity to encounter one of South Korea’s most intriguing women poets.—Ruth Williams.

Description

One of Korea's most exacting and innovative poets, Jeongrye Choi writes a poetry that uncovers the strangeness of everyday experience. Alert and streetwise, but tuned into the undercurrent of things, Choi's poetry creates environments at once familiar but dreamlike, marked by a preternatural clarity. Favoring imagistic condensation and formal trimness, Choi's poetry possesses a highly-suggestive, allusive intensity that locates the startling within the familiar. Always rooted in the here-and-now, Choi's speakers are simultaneously outside it, questioning the propriety of our taken-for-granted arrangements. Delicate and wistful, this poetry has the tensile strength to address itself to the deepest challenges of human experience: as Choi writes, with characteristic (and deceptive) off-handedness, "hey abyss." In a world of inconstancy and ceaseless transformation, Choi's poetry forgoes easy consolations and instead offers poetry of the highest order as the only consolation. Reading it offers an almost vertiginous sense of the variousness of experience. As Brenda Hillman observes, "There is a quality of imagination in her work that is still a rare thing in poetry."

About the Translators

Brenda Hillman is the author of eight collections of poetry, the most recent of which is Practical Water. She is the Olivia C. Filippi Professor of Poetry at Saint Mary's College in Moraga, California. | Wayne de Fremery recently received his doctorate from Harvard University with a dissertation on Korean poetry from the 1920s. He currently lives near Seoul where he continues his study of Korean literature.

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Price: $18.00

International Advances in Writing Research: Cultures, Places, Measures

$45.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-352-7

Edited by Charles Bazerman, Chris Dean, Jessica Early, Karen Lunsford, Suzie Null, Paul Rogers, and Amanda Stansell

Perspectives on Writing Series (The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-352-7 (paperback, $45, £29, $45 CAD, €36, $44 AUS) 978-1-60235-353-4 (hardcover, $80, £51, $80 CAD, €63, $80 AUS) 978-1-60235-354-1 (Adobe ebook, $25, £16, $25 CAD, €20, $25 AUS) © 2012 by Charles Bazerman, Chris Dean, Jessica Early, Karen Lunsford, Suzie Null, Paul Rogers, and Amanda Stansell. 568 pages, with notes, illustrations, and bibliographies.

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Description

The thirty chapters in International Advances in Writing Research: Cultures, Places, Measures were selected from the more than 500 presentations at the Writing Research Across Borders II Conference in 2011. With representatives from more than forty countries, this conference gave rise to the International Society for the Advancement of Writing Research. The chapters selected for this collection represent cutting edge research on writing from all regions, organized around three themes—cultures, places, and measures. The authors report research that considers writing in all levels of schooling, in science, in the public sphere, and in the workplace, as well as the relationship among these various places of writing. The authors also consider the cultures of writing—among them national cultures, gender cultures, schooling cultures, scientific cultures, and cultures of the workplace.

About the Editors

Charles Bazerman, Professor of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is the author of numerous publications on the social role of writing, academic genres, and textual analysis. Chris Dean, Lecturer in the Writing Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara, recently co-authored the textbook, Terra Incognita: Researching the Weird. Jessica Early, Assistant Professor of English at Arizona State University, is the author of Opening the Gates: Creating Real World Writing Opportunities For Diverse Secondary Students and Stirring Up Justice: Reading and Writing to Change the World. Karen Lunsford, Associate Professor of Writing at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has published on issues including multimodality, science writing, and policy issues that affect writing research. Suzie Null, Assistant Professor of Teacher Education at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, includes among her publications the co-edited collection, Traditions of Writing Research. Paul Rogers, Assistant Professor of English at George Mason University, is co-editor of two collections, Writing Across the Curriculum: A Critical Sourcebook, and Traditions of Writing Research. Amanda Stansell, Lecturer at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is also co-editor of Traditions of Writing Research.

Contents

Introduction
Section 1. Pedagogical Approaches
1. Academic Writing Instruction in Australian Tertiary Education: The Early Years by Kate Chanock
2. Teacher’s Perceptions of English Language Writing Instruction in Chinaby Danling Fu and Marylou Matoush
3. Access and Teachers’ Perceptions of Professional Development in Writing by Sarah J. McCarthey, Rebecca L. Woodard, and Grace Kang
4. Multimodality in Subtitling for the Deaf and the Hard-of-Hearing Education in Brazil by Vera Lúcia Santiago Araújo

Section 2. Assessment
5. Rethinking K-12 Writing Assessment to Support Best Instructional Practices by Paul Deane, John Sabatini, and Mary Fowles
6. Automated Essay Scoring and The Search for Valid Writing Assessment by Andrew Klobucar, Paul Deane, Norbert Elliot, Chaitanya Ramineni, Perry Deess, and Alex Rudniy
7. Construct Validity, Length, Score, and Time in Holistically Graded Writing Assessments: The Case against Automated Essay Scoring (AES) by Les Perelman
8. The Politics of Research and Assessment in Writing by Peggy O’Neill, Sandy Murphy, and Linda Adler-Kassner
9. Prominent Feature Analysis: Linking Assessment and Instruction by Sherry S. Swain, Richard L. Graves, David T. Morse, and Kimberly J. Patterson
10. “A Matter of Personal Taste”: Teachers’ Constructs of Writing Quality in the Secondary School English Classroom by Helen Lines

Section 3. Writing at the Borders of School and the World
11. The Reality of Fiction-writing in Situations of Political Violence by Colette Daiute
12. Naming in Pupil Writings (9 to 14 Years Old) by Christina Romain and Marie-Noëlle Roubaud
13. Does the Internet Connect Writing in and out of Educational Settings? Views of Norwegian students on the Threshold of Higher Education by Håvard Skaar
14. Sponsoring “Green” Subjects: The World Bank’s 2009 Youth Essay Contest by Anne E. Porter
15. Metaphors of Writing and Intersections with Jamaican Male Identity by Carmeneta Jones and Vivette Milson-Whyte

Section 4. Writing the Borders of School and Professional Practice
16. Transcending the Border between Classroom and Newsroom: An Inquiry into the Efficacy of Newspaper Editing Practices by Yvonne Stephens
17. Teachers as Editors, Editors as Teachers by Angela M. Kohnen
18. Academic Genres in University Contexts: An Investigation of Students’ Book Reviews Writing as Classroom Assignments by Antonia Dilamar Araújo
19. Learning Careers and Enculturation: Production of Scientific Papers by PhD Students in a Mexican Physiology Laboratory: An Exploratory Case Study by Alma Carrasco, Rollin Kent, and Nancy Keranen
Section 5. Scientific and Academic Practice
20. The Life Cycle of the Scientific Writer: An Investigation of the Senior Academic Scientist as Writer in Australasian Universities by Lisa Emerson
21. Publication Practices and Multilingual Professionals in US Universities: Towards Critical Perspectives on Administration and Pedagogy by Missy Watson
22. Immersed in the Game of Science: Beliefs, Emotions, and Strategies of NNES Scientists who Regularly Publish in English by Nancy Keranen, Fatima Encinas, and Charles Bazerman
23. Critical Acts in Published and Unpublished Research Article Introductions in English: A Look into the Writing for Publication Process by Pilar Mur-Dueñas
24. Towards an Integrative Unit of Analysis: Regulation Episodes in Expert Research Article Writing by Anna Iñesta and Montserrat Castelló
25. Producing Scholarly Texts: Writing in English in a Politically Stigmatized Country by Mehdi Riazi
26. The Evaluation of Conference Paper Proposals in Linguistics by Françoise Boch, Fanny Rinck, and Aurélie Nardy

Section 6. Cultures of Writing in the Workplace
27. Genre and Generic Labor by Clay Spinuzzi
28. Construction of Caring Identities in the New Work Order by Zoe Nikolaidou and Anna-Malin Karlsson
29. Online Book Reviews and Emerging Generic Conventions: A Situated Study of Authorship, Publishing, and Peer Review by Tim Laquintano
30. Coming to Grips with Complexity: Dynamic Systems Theory in the Research of Newswriting by Daniel Perrin

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Invasion of the MOOCs: The Promises and Perils of Massive Open Online Courses

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-533-0

Edited by Steven D. Krause and Charles Lowe

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-533-0 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-534-7 (hardcover, $60). 978-1-60235-535-4 (Adobe ebook, free download) © 2014 by Parlor Press and the respective authors.

Invasion of the MOOCs is also available in PDF format for free download under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

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Description

Invasion of the MOOCs: The Promise and Perils of Massive Open Online Courses is one of the first collections of essays about the phenomenon of “Massive Online Open Courses.” Unlike accounts in the mainstream media and educational press, Invasion of the MOOCs is not written from the perspective of removed administrators, would-be education entrepreneurs/venture capitalists, or political pundits. Rather, this collection of essays comes from faculty who developed and taught MOOCs in 2012 and 2013, students who participated in those MOOCs, and academics and observers who have first hand experience with MOOCs and higher education. These twenty-one essays reflect the complexity of the very definition of what is (and what might in the near future be) a “MOOC,” along with perspectives and opinions that move far beyond the polarizing debate about MOOCs that has occupied the media in previous accounts. Toward that end, Invasion of the MOOCs reflects a wide variety of impressions about MOOCs from the most recent past and projects possibilities about MOOCs for the not so distant future.

Contributors include Aaron Barlow, Siân Bayne, Nick Carbone, Kaitlin Clinnin, Denise K. Comer, Glenna L. Decker, Susan Delagrange, Scott Lloyd DeWitt, Jeffrey T. Grabill, Laura Gibbs, Kay Halasek, Bill Hart-Davidson, Karen Head, Jacqueline Kauza, Jeremy Knox, Steven D. Krause, Alan Levine, Charles Lowe, Hamish Macleod, Ben McCorkle, Jennifer Michaels, James E. Porter, Alexander Reid, Jeff Rice, Jen Ross, Bob Samuels, Cynthia L. Selfe, Christine Sinclair, Melissa Syapin, Edward M. White, Elizabeth D. Woodworth, and Heather Noel Young.

About the Editors

Steven D. Krause is a Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at Eastern Michigan University. Some of his recent scholarship has appeared in College Composition and Communication, Kairos, and Computers and Composition, and he has published commentaries in AFT On Campus and The Chronicle of Higher Education. His blog at stevendkrause.com won the John Lovas Memorial Weblog award from Kairos in 2011.

Charles Lowe is an Associate Professor of Writing at Grand Valley State University where he teaches web design, professional writing, business communication, document design, and first-year writing. He is a long time open educational resource advocate, and the co-editor of Writing Spaces Volumes 1 and 2.

Contents

"Introduction: Building on the Tradition of CCK08" by Charles Lowe
"MOOCology 1.0" by Glenna L. Decker
"Framing Questions about MOOCs and Writing Courses" by James E. Porter
"A MOOC or Not a MOOC: ds106 Questions the Form" by Alan Levine
"Why We Are Thinking About MOOC" by Jeffrey T. Grabill
"The Hidden Costs of MOOCs" by Karen Head
"Coursera: Fifty Ways to Fix the Software (with apologies to Paul Simon)" by Laura Gibbs
"Being Present in a University Writing Course: A Case Against MOOCs" by Bob Samuels
"Another Colonialist Tool?" by Aaron Barlow
"MOOCversations: Commonplaces as Argument" by Jeff Rice
"MOOC Feedback: Pleasing All the People?" by Jeremy Knox, Jen Ross, Christine Sinclair, Hamish Macleod, and Siân Bayne
"More Questions than Answers: Scratching at the Surface of MOOCs in Higher Educatio" by Jacqueline Kauza
"Those Moot MOOCs: My MOOC Experience" by Melissa Syapin
"MOOC Assigned" by Steven D. Krause
"Learning How to Teach … Differently: Extracts from a MOOC Instructor’s Journal" by Denise K. Comer
"MOOC as Threat and Promise" by Edward M. White
"A MOOC With a View: How MOOCs Encourage Us to Reexamine Pedagogical Doxa" by Kay Halasek, Ben McCorkle, Cynthia L. Selfe, Scott Lloyd DeWitt, Susan Delagrange, Jennifer Michaels, and Kaitlin Clinnin
"Putting the U in MOOCs: The Importance of Usability in Course Design" by Heather Noel Young
“'I open at the close': A Post-MOOC Meta-Happening Reflection and What I’m Going to Do About Tha" by Elizabeth D. Woodworth
"Here a MOOC, There a MOOC" by Nick Carbone
"Writing and Learning with Feedback Machines" by Alexander Reid
"Learning Many-to-Many: The Best Case for Writing in Digital Environments" by Bill Hart-Davidson
"After the Invasion: What’s Next for MOOCs?" by Steven D. Krause
Contributors
Index

© 2014 by Parlor Press. Individual essays © 2014 by the respective authors. Unless otherwise stated, these works are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License and are subject to the Writing Spaces Terms of Use. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. To obtain permission beyond this use, contact the individual author(s).

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Inventing Comics

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-869-0

A New Translation of Rodolphe Töpffer's Reflections on Graphic Storytelling, Media Rhetorics, and Aesthetic Practice

Rodolphe Töpffer
Edited, Translated, and Introduced by Sergio C. Figueiredo

Visual Rhetoric
Series Editor, Marguerite Helmers

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-869-0 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-870-6 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-871-3 (PDF on CD, $20) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 212 pages with 77 illustrations, notes, and bibliography. In English and French.

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Description

In recent years, graphic novels have gained a renewed interest from a host of scholars in a diverse range of fields, including rhetoric and writing, media studies, literary studies, visual communication, graphic arts, and art history. While many of these studies reference Rodolphe Töpffer as the inventor (or, "father") of the genre, his scholarly work addressing the theoretical foundation and significance of graphic novels has remained unavailable to English-speaking audiences. Inventing Comics fills this gap by presenting a translation of two essays by Töpffer that place the invention of graphic novels at the intersection of rhetoric, philosophy, aesthetics, and civic life.

In his role as a professor of rhetoric and belle-lettres at the Academy of Geneva, Töpffer not only wrote popular fiction (graphic novels, novels, plays) but also a host of scholarly works addressing the relationship between aesthetics and poetics. Pulling from Töpffer's scholarly corpus, Figueiredo argues that Töpffer's invention of graphic novels was the manifestation of a much broader media theory, one that engaged with the social, cultural, political, and technological shifts accompanying the Industrial Revolution in the early- and mid-nineteenth century. While Figueiredo's primary focus is to situate Töpffer in the histories of rhetoric, media studies, and the emergence of what Gregory L. Ulmer has called the apparatus of electracy, these essays also resonate with affect theory, apparatus theory, art history, graphic novels, literary studies, philosophy, sensory studies, and writing studies.

About the Editor and Translator

Sergio C. Figueiredo is Assistant Professor of Media and Rhetoric in the Department of English at Kennesaw State University. He received his PhD in Rhetorics, Communication, and Information Design from Clemson University, and his MA in English from Marshall University. His research focuses on the intersections of rhetorical theory, media studies, and electracy. His work has appeared in Textshop Experiments, ImageTexT: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies, Journal of Visual Literacy, and In Media Res: A Media Commons Project. He serves as a Fellow with the Global Art and Ideas Nexus, contributing to the organization's e-Magazine, Esthesis, and special programs, including the Critical Conversations series.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Translator's Introduction: "Rudolphe Töpffer, Media Rhetorics, and Electracy"
Part 1: Essai de Physiognomonie
Introduction to "Essai de Physiognomonie"
"Essai de Physiognomonie"
Chapter 1: Advantages Specific to Graphic Literature
Chapter 2: Similarities and Differences with Parody
Chapter 3: How Graphic Literature Can Independently Cultivate an Advanced Culture in the Arts. Advantages of the Autographic Method
Chapter 4: Advantages and Properties of Line Art
Chapter 5: Of a Method that Demands a Basic Understanding of Physiognomy, Apart from the Study of Drawing
Chapter 6: Similarities, and Where this Method Leads
Chapter 7: Differences Regarding the Principles and Results Between Phrenology and Physiognomy
Chapter 8: Two Orders of Expressive Design in the Human Head: Permanent and Non-Permanent
Chapter 9: On Combining Expressive Signs
Chapter 10: On Permanent Expressive Signs
Chapter 11: On Non-Permanent Expressive Signs
Chapter 12: On Conforming Physiognomic Signs, and Conclusion
Part 2: "Essai d'Autographie"
"Essai d'Autographie"
Part 3: "Of a Genevan Painter"
Introduction to "Of a Genevan Painter"
"Of a Genevan Painter"
Works Cited
Index

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Kenneth Burke: From Myth to Ecology

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-455-5

Laurence Coupe

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-455-5 (paperback; $30.00), 978-1-60235-456-2 (Adobe ebook; $20) © 2013 by Parlor Press. 217 pages with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Reviews

Galleymore, Isabel. Review. Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism 18.1 (2014): 111-12. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14688417.2014.891837

Description

Kenneth Burke: From Myth to Ecology is the first full-length study of a remarkable thinker’s approach to those founding narratives, those essential structures of thought, which cannot be credited to any one individual but rather belong to the whole community. As such, it explores the way Burke developed an increasingly “green” perspective on the stories we tell one another in order to make sense of our world. In celebrating Burke’s achievement, Laurence Coupe presents us with a complete picture of a mind that is comprehensive, compassionate, and “comic.” For Burke, myth is the chief means by which humanity can come to terms with itself and its own dangerous ambitions. Hence to be alert to the way myth functions is to become responsible toward the planet that is our home. In emphasizing this aspect of Burke’s work, Coupe argues that Burke’s theory of myth is urgently contemporary.

About the Author

Laurence Coupe is Senior Lecturer in English at Manchester Metropolitan University, where he has pioneered the study of the mythic and ecological aspects of both literature and culture. He is the author of Myth (Routledge, 2nd ed. 2009) and the editor of The Green Studies Reader: From Romanticism to Ecocriticism (Routledge, 2000). Other books include Marina Warner (Northcote House, 2006) and Beat Sound, Beat Vision: The Beat Spirit and Popular Song (Manchester University Press, 2007).

Contents

Abbreviations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. Myth and Society
2. Myth and Literary Criticism
3. Myth and “Ritual Drama”
4. Myth and “Victimage”
5. Myth and Ecology
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index

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Labored: The State(ment) and Future of Work in Composition

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-891-1

Edited by Randall McClure, Dayna V. Goldstein, and Michael A. Pemberton

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-891-1 (paperback, $34); 978-1-60235-892-8 (hardcover, $68); 978-1-60235-893-5 (PDF on CD, $20) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 344 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Labored: The State(ment) and Future of Work in Composition offers both a retrospective and a prospective look at the 1989 Statement of Principles and Standards for the Postsecondary Teaching of Writing and its relation to the changing nature of work in composition. Stemming from an investigative project to strengthen the Statement with data culled from national reports on labor conditions, Labored draws on the expertise of scholars whose research agendas and lived experiences afford fresh insights and critical analyses on labor issues in composition and writing program administration.

The essays in Labored demonstrate the potential impact of a new labor statement tailored not just for teachers and administrators of college composition but all those whose work is shaped by the current economies of postsecondary education. Contributors examine relevant national reports and recent trends in composition studies and writing program administration, interrogate the politics of labor statements, explore the changing landscape of employment for composition faculty, and chart a new course for quantitative research on the working conditions of composition teachers and writing program administrators around the globe.

Labored includes an Afterword by Joseph Harris and a data-enhanced version of the Statement. Contributors include Chris Anson, Valerie Balester, Evelyn Beck, Barbara D'Angelo, Timothy R. Dougherty, Casie J. Fedukovich, Joanne Baird Giordano, Dayna V. Goldstein, Risa P. Gorelick, Jeanne Gunner, Joseph Harris, Holly Hassel, Alice S. Horning, Joseph Janangelo, Barry Maid, Randall McClure, James C. McDonald, Susan Miller-Cochran, Michael A. Pemberton, James P. Purdy, Brent Simoneaux, Robin Snead, and Susan Wyche.

About the Editors

Randall McClure is Associate Professor of English and Chair of the Humanities Department at Pfeiffer University. He researches in the areas of information behavior and academic writing, teaching and learning online, and academic policy. He has published articles in The Writing Instructor, Inside Higher Ed, portal: Libraries and the Academy, Computers and Composition Online, Academic Exchange Quarterly, Computers and Composition, Writing Spaces, Writing Program Administration, Writing & Pedagogy, and the Journal of Literacy and Technology. He is co-editor with James P. Purdy of The New Digital Scholar: Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students and The Next Digital Scholar: A Fresh Approach to the Common Core State Standards in Research and Writing.

Dayna V. Goldstein holds a PhD from Kent State University. She is an adjunct online instructor with a specialization/concentration in Rhetoric & Writing with the University of Phoenix. Dr. Goldstein's research interests include systems theories, writing assessment, and academic labor.  She is on the Editorial Board of FORUM: Issues about Part-Time and Contingent Faculty and the CCCC taskforce that recently wrote the CCCC Statement on Working Conditions for Non-Tenure-Track Writing Faculty. She enjoys teaching rhetoric, writing, and genre ecologies. Beyond advocating for academic labor, Dr. Goldstein's work is devoted to bringing systems theory and object-oriented assessment practices into writing assessment.

Michael A. Pemberton is Professor of Writing and Linguistics at Georgia Southern University and director of the University Writing Center. A past president of the International Writing Centers Association, he has published five books, including The Ethics of Writing Instruction: Issues in Theory and Practice, The Center Will Hold: Critical Reflections on Writing Center Scholarship, and Bookmarks: A Guide to Research and Writing, and more than 50 articles on writing center theory, tutoring ethics, and writing technologies in journals such as College Composition and Communication, Computers and Composition, the Writing Center Journal, and numerous book chapters. He serves on the editorial and review boards of the WAC Clearinghouse, Computers and Composition, Praxis, and the Journal of Writing and Pedagogy, and is current editor of the journal Across the Disciplines.  In 2015, he was appointed the Associate Director of the CWPA Consultant Evaluator Service and also serves as the Series Editor for ATD Books.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Labor Practices, the Statement, and the Future of Work in Composition by Randall McClure, Dayna V. Goldstein, and Michael A. Pemberton

Section 1: The Statement in Context
Reflections of an Anonymous Graduate Student on the Wyoming Conference Resolution by Susan Wyche
I Stand Here Ironing by Chris Anson
My War on the CCCC Statement by Valerie Balester
Elegy for a Statement by Jeanne Gunner

Section 2: The Statement and Present-Day Labor Conditions
One of Many: The CCCC Statement in the Context of Other Position Statements on Academic Labor by James C. McDonald
The jWPA: Caught Between the Promises of Portland and Laramie by Timothy R. Dougherty
The Missing Piece: Where Is the Labor-Related Research at the Research Network Forum? by Risa P. Gorelick
A State of Permanent Contingency: Writing Programs, Hiring Practices, and a Permanent Breach of Ethics by Casie J. Fedukovich, Susan Miller-Cochran, Brent Simoneaux, and Robin Snead
Contingency, Access, and the Material Conditions of Teaching and Learning in the Statement by Holly Hassel and Joanne Baird Giordano

Section 3: Rescripting the Statement
Rethinking the "Legitimate" Reasons for Hiring Adjunct Faculty: A Recension Statement of Its Own by Evelyn Beck
Recognizing Realities by Barry Maid and Barbara D'Angelo
A Focus on Reading: An Essential Component of the Next Statement by Alice S. Horning
Going Digital: Ideas for Updating the Statement for a Digital World by James P. Purdy
Out of Print: Revising the Statement for More Inclusive Storytelling by Joseph Janangelo
Strengthening the Statement: Data on Working Conditions in College Composition by Randall McClure, Dayna V. Goldstein, and Michael A. Pemberton
Afterword by Joseph Harris

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Locating Visual-Material Rhetorics: The Map, the Mill, and the GPS

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-254-4

Amy D. Propen

Visual Rhetoric Series
Edited by Marguerite Helmers

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-254-4 (paperback, $32, £22, $33 CAD, €26, $32 AUS) 978-1-60235-255-1 (hardcover, $65, £43, $67 CAD, €52, $65 AUS) 978-1-60235-256-8 (Adobe ebook on CD, $25; £17, $26 CAD, €21, $25 AUS. © 2012 by Parlor Press. 281 pages with illustrations, notes, appendices, and bibliography.

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Parks, maps, and mapping technologies like the GPS are objects of visual and material culture that rely on the interplay of text, context, image, and space to guide our interpretations of the world around us. Locating Visual-Material Rhetorics: The Map, the Mill, and the GPS examines in depth, and in several contemporary settings, how visual and material discursive artifacts, when understood as rhetorical, shape our understanding of the unique cultural moments that these artifacts set out to represent. Using three cases that involve an exploration of the corporeal influence of the green spaces and commemorative sculptures at the Lowell Mills National Historical Park in Lowell, Massachusetts; the cartographic texts produced by GPS devices; and two maps involved in a federal court case about marine mammal protection, this book explores and tests the value of what Propen calls “visual-material rhetorics,” or a visual rhetoric more expressly attuned to studies of space, the body, and materiality. Grounding all three cases is a theoretical approach that combines Michel Foucault’s theory of heterotopias with Carole Blair’s theory of material rhetoric. Such an approach brings Foucault’s important work on spatiality into conversation with visual-material rhetorics to show how we benefit from conceptualizing rhetorical objects as not merely textual in the traditional sense but also as both visual and material—as spatial. Together, the cases in this book demonstrate how visual-material rhetorics illuminate the contexts that shape our various lived and embodied experiences and how visual-material rhetorics function in the service of advocacy.

About the Author

Amy D. Propen is Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and Composition at York College of Pennsylvania. She received her PhD in Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication from the University of Minnesota. Her research on visual rhetoric, critical cartographies, and rhetoric as advocacy has appeared in journals and edited collections, including Technical Communication Quarterly, Written Communication, ACME: An International E-Journal of Critical Geographies, and Rethinking Maps: New Frontiers in Cartographic Theory. She is co-author, with Mary Lay Schuster, of Victim Advocacy in the Courtroom: Persuasive Practices in Domestic Violence and Child Protection Cases.

Contents

Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction

1 Visual Rhetoric and Spatiality
2 The Visual-Material Spectrum 
3 Empathizing with Marginalized Bodies
4 Navigating the Mediated, Posthuman Body
5 Advocating for Nonhuman Bodies
6 Locating Visual-Material Rhetorics

Appendix A: Interview Questions, Chapter Four
Appendix B: Coding Categories and Subcategories Derived from Interviews in Chapter Four
Notes
Works Cited
Index
About the Author

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Maria Graham's Journal of a Voyage to Brazil

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-187-5

Jennifer Hayward and M. Soledad Caballero

Writing Travel Series
Edited by Jeanne Moskal

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-187-5 (paperback, $32.00; £22; €25; $34 CAD; $34 AUS). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 425 pages, with illustrations, annotations, notes, bibliography, and index.

Other Formats Available 978-1-60235-188-2 (hardcover, $65.00; £46; €52; $69 CAD; $69 AUS); 978-1-60235-189-9 (Adobe eBook, $16.00; £12; €13; $18 CAD; $18 AUS)

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Description

Maria Graham’s Journal of a Voyage to Brazil is a scholarly edition of nineteenth century travel writer Graham’s travel narrative first published in 1824.  One of only a few women travelers to have written about her experiences in South America in the early nineteenth century, Graham provides an invaluable first-hand account of Brazil and its transformation from a Portuguese colony to an independent nation.  She offers not only observations about social customs, politics, and the role of the British in South America but also insights into Brazilian slavery at a time of rising abolitionist activism.  This edition is unique in incorporating Graham's own unpublished corrections to her first edition and in bringing together supplementary materials to contextualize the journal, including contemporary reviews of her narrative, early nineteenth century maps of Brazil, and Graham’s unpublished autobiographical and historical sketch, “Life of Don Pedro.”  The edition also provides an editors’ introduction situating Graham’s narrative in relation to the few extant travel narratives about Brazil—all written by men—as well as within the socio-historical and cultural landscape of her time, with particular focus on abolitionist discourses and the process of Brazilian independence.  Graham actively imagined Brazil as a New World site of extraordinary possibility, and she envisioned herself as furthering the country’s development; she critiqued slavery in particular as a practice antithetical to Brazil’s transformation into a modern, civilized nation.  Graham creates a complex, and sometimes contradictory, portrait of Brazil as a wilderness ripe with plenitude and possibility as well as an emergent nation-state, a visionary site of New World modernity.

About the Authors

Jennifer Hayward, professor and chair of English at The College of Wooster, received her PhD in English Literature from Princeton University. In addition to essays on nineteenth century British travelers in Latin America, she is author of Consuming Fictions: Active Audiences and Serial Fictions from Dickens to Soaps (University Press of Kentucky, 1997) and editor of Maria Graham’s 1824 Journal of a Residence in Chile (University Press of Virginia, 2003). Hayward’s academic awards include an NEH Summer Stipend (2006), and BSA and Huntington Library/British Academy Fellowships (2006). Her current research focuses on nineteenth century Scottish travellers in the Americas, with particular focus on gendered perspectives and issues of national identity.

M. Soledad Caballero is an associate professor of English at Allegheny College and received her PhD from Tufts University. Her teaching and research interests include British Romanticism, travel writing, women’s literature, and Latino/a contemporary literatures. She has published articles about women travel writers Maria Dundas Graham and Frances Calderón de la Barca in scholarly journals as well as edited collections. She has also published a short memoir piece about bilingualism. Currently she is working on a longer project about the aesthetics of monstrosity in the nineteenth century, in particular how ideas of the monstrous map onto foreign bodies or alienated bodies in the body politics of late eighteenth and early nineteenth century England.

Contents

Introduction
Editorial Method
Acknowledgments
Journal of a Voyage to Brazil
Appendix I: Maps of Brazil, 1818 and 1819
Appendix II: Sketch of the History of Brazil
Appendix III: The Quarterly Review
Appendix IV: Maria Graham’s Unpublished “Life of Don Pedro”
Selected Bibliography
Index
About the Authors

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Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action: Audio-Visual Rhetoric for Writing Teachers

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-336-7

Bump Halbritter

* Winner of the 2013 Distinguished Book Award from Computers and Composition.

New Media Theory
Edited by Byron Hawk

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-336-7 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-337-4 (hardcover, $65); 978-1-60235-338-1 (Adobe ebook, $20) © 2013 by Parlor Press. 275 pages, with illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action: Audio-Visual Rhetoric for Writing Teachers addresses the current technological challenges and opportunities of writing teachers through a conceptualization of writing and reading that could not have been imagined by many writing teachers at the turn of the twenty-first century. While Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action looks forward to emerging writing technologies, it finds its theoretical foundations by looking back to Kenneth Burke’s concept of symbolic action. Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action situates its pedagogy for engaging the multidimensional rhetoric of audio-visual writing to help new and experienced writing teachers select, create, and engage productive models for designing audio-visual writing assignments and curricula. Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action draws upon Erika Lindemann and her pioneering work in A Rhetoric for Writing Teachers, as well as the educational theory of John Dewey, the multiliteracy theory of Stuart Selber, and the design philosophy of Robin Williams. Rather than look to the creation and critique of audio-visual texts as the goal of its pedagogy, Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action looks for ways to use the creation and critique of audio-visual texts as a means for realizing a variety of learning goals for writing students. Bump Halbritter establishes not only the theoretical foundation for that work but also discusses, in depth, the material demands of working with audio-visual assets that writing teachers have not typically been trained to use: microphones, video cameras, and an array of other peripheral technologies for collecting, storing, and exchanging audio-visual information.
 
BUMP HALBRITTER is Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Writing at Michigan State University and is Editor of CCC Online. His work on aural rhetoric and audio-visual writing pedagogy has appeared in Kairos, Enculturation, Computers and Composition, College English, and in the edited collection, Digital Tools. Halbritter and Julie Lindquist are co-PIs of the long-term research project LiteracyCorps Michigan, a multi-phase research project that uses digital video to investigate and document the literate lives of college students.

The voice and style are one of Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action’s great strengths, as they render the subject approachable and readable to those who might not yet consider themselves a part of Read/Write (RW) culture. Halbritter makes a compelling argument for why we should become engaged in the (symbolic) action of multimedia composing. . . . This book makes me want to change the way I teach; that’s part of its power. — Erin Karper

Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1 Twenty-First Century Writing as Symbolic Action
2 Learning Goals: The Unfinished Works of Twenty-First Century Writing
3 Reading Like a Writer: Exposing the Layers of Multidimensional Rhetoric
4 Mics: What Do Writing Teachers Need to Know about Audio?
5 Cameras: What Do Writing Teachers Need to Know about Video?
6 Teaching Twenty-First Century Writing as Symbolic Action
Notes
Works Cited
Index
About the Author

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Mikhail Bakhtin: Rhetoric, Poetics, Dialogics, Rhetoricality

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-725-9

Don Bialostosky

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-725-9 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-726-6 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-727-3 (eBook; $20) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 203 pages with index, notes, and bibliography.

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Description

Foregrounding language and the utterance in the work of Mikhail Bakhtin and his colleague Valentin Voloshinov, Mikhail Bakhtin: Rhetoric, Poetics, Dialogics, Rhetoricality examines their insights against the background of the classical, predominantly Aristotelian, verbal liberal arts of rhetoric, dialectic, and poetics. First setting Bakhtinian dialogics against a narrow rhetoric aimed at winning over others, it goes on, drawing upon the school's earlier phenomenological and sociological writings, to elaborate a Bakhtinian discourse theory that sees all utterances as rhetorical in an expanded sense and poetry as an imitation of rhetorical utterance.

Bialostosky invents a Bakhtinian dialogic criticism that he situates against such figures as Todorov, Gadamer, Rorty, and Booth and explores the potentials of Bakhtin-School thought for a revitalized rhetorical criticism. He draws parallels between Bakhtin's dialogism and Michael Billig's sophistic sociology and argues the importance of language and history in Bakhtin's earliest work against Morson and Emerson's emphasis on ethics. He sets Aristotelian rhetoric against Bakhtin's discourse theory and reads Aristotle's Poetics against the grain to bring out its category of "thought" or dianoia as a site from which a Bakhtinian poetics of utterance can be recovered. A compilation and extension of more than thirty years' work on the Bakhtin School, Mikhail Bakhtin: Rhetoric, Poetics, Dialogics, Rhetoricality demonstrates the rich implications of Bakhtin's works for rhetorical theory, practice, and understanding.

About the Author

An early adopter of Bakhtin School ideas, Don Bialostosky first mobilized them to rehabilitate Wordsworth's narrative experiments in Making Tales (Chicago 1984) and extended them to rethink his lyric poetry and the critics who wrote about them in Wordsworth, Dialogics, and the Practice of Criticism (Cambridge 1992). Participant in the first international Bakhtin conferences in the early 1980s and contributor to the first bibliographies of the Bakhtin Newsletter, he introduced Bakhtin to a CCCC convention in 1984 and published the first article on Bakhtin in PMLA in 1986. His forthcoming book How to Play a Poem from the University of Pittsburgh Press brings Bakhtin School poetics to a pedagogy for poetry. Rhetoric has been on his radar since his undergraduate studies in the Analysis of Ideas and the Study of Methods at Chicago, where his engagement with the art was reinforced by graduate work with Wayne Booth, to whose memory this volume is dedicated. He has taught at the Universities of Utah and Washington, at Stony Brook and Toledo and Penn State. Currently he is Professor in the Composition, Literacy, Pedagogy, and Rhetoric track and Chair of the English Department at the University of Pittsburgh.

Contents

Abbreviations Used in Text and Notes
Preface
1. Introduction

Part I. Dialogics, Rhetoric, Criticism
2. Dialogics as an Art of Discourse
3. Booth, Bakhtin, and the Culture of Criticism
4. Rhetoric, Literary Criticism, Theory, and Bakhtin
5. Bakhtin and Rhetorical Criticism
6. Antilogics, Dialogics, and Sophistic Social Psychology

Part II. Architectonics, Poetics, Rhetoricality, Liberal Education
7. Bakhtin's "Rough Draft"
8. Architectonics, Rhetoric, and Poetics in the Bakhtin School's Early Phenomenological and Sociological Texts
9. Aristotle's Rhetoric and Bakhtin's Discourse Theory
10. Rereading the Place of Rhetoric in Aristotle's Poetics in Light of Bakhtin's Discourse Theory: Rhetoric as Dianoia, Poetics as an Imitation of Rhetoric
11. Liberal Education, Writing, and the Dialogic Self
Notes
Works Cited
About the Author
Index

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Nellie Arnott's Writings on Angola, 1905–1913: Missionary Narratives Linking Africa and America

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-141-7

Sarah Robbins and Ann Ellis Pullen

Writing Travel Series
Edited by Jeanne Moskal

2012 Edition Award Honorable Mention, Society for the Study of American Women Writers

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-141-7 (paperback,  $32.00; £22; €25; $34 CAD;  $34 AUS). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 381 pages, with illustrations, annotations, notes, bibliography, and index.

Other Formats Available 978-1-60235-142-4 (hardcover, $65.00; £46; €52; $69 CAD;  $69 AUS); 978-1-60235-143-1 (Adobe eBook; $20.00; £14; €16; $22 CAD;  $22 AUS )

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Nellie Arnott's Writings on Angola, 1905–1913 FlyerDownload the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format).


Description

Nellie Arnott's Writing on Angola, 1905-1913 recovers and interprets the public texts of a teacher serving at a mission station sponsored by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions in Portuguese West Africa. Along with a collection of her magazine narratives, mission reports, and correspondence, Nellie Arnott's Writing on Angola offers a critical analysis of Arnott's writing about her experiences in Africa, including interactions with local Umbundu Christians, and about her journey home to the U.S., when she spent time promoting the mission movement before marrying and settling in California.

Nellie Arnott's Writings on Angola sets Arnott's writing within the context of its historical moment, especially the particular situation of American Protestant women missionaries working in a Portuguese colony. This book responds to recent calls for scholarship exploring specific cases of cross-cultural exchange in colonial settings, with a recognition that no single pattern of relationships would hold in all such sites. Robbins and Pullen also position Arnott's diverse texts within the tradition of feminist scholarship drawing on multifaceted archives to recover women's under-studied publications from previous eras.

Part I presents three approaches to interpreting Arnott's oeuvre: biographical (Chapter 1), historical (Chapter 2), and rhetorical (Chapter 3). Chapters 4, 5, and 6 (Part II) provide an annotated edition of Arnott's public texts, organized into three stages of authorial development, ranging from her initial journey to Africa, to her gradual professionalization as a mission teacher, to her travels home and fundraising while on furlough.

What People Are Saying

Sarah Robbins and Ann Ellis Pullen used Nellie Arnott’s public writings to show how Arnott developed as a writer…. Robbins and Pullen do not hesitate to characterize Arnott’s work as part of a colonial enterprise. Through a careful analysis of her writings, however, they argue that Arnott’s experiences in Angola enabled her to develop her authorial voice, contribute to building an important female literacy network in the United States, and shape the imagination of new constituencies of mission supporters for Africa. (197-98).

—Barbara Reeves-Ellington, writing for Social Sciences and Missions 24 (2011)

Arnott's missionary narratives, which take readers on a fascinating odyssey from the American South to Portuguese West Africa to the golden state of California, demonstrate the complex national and transnational contexts that shaped perceptions about race, class, gender, and religion in the early twentieth century.  Robbins's and Pullen's scrupulous and exhaustive archival research on Arnott's life and public and private writing distinguishes their book from other recovered travel literature. They demonstrate the significance of feminist discursive analysis as a methodology for understanding culture.

—Barbara McCaskill, University of Georgia

In my graduate class, which focuses on American women’s rhetoric and religion, I use Nellie Arnott’s Writings on Angola, as part our examination of the women’s missionary movement and its empowering impact on women. I especially appreciate how Robbins and Pullen's book contributes to my class's discussions of women’s rhetorical practices, the archival recovery of women rhetors, and the value of interdisciplinary inquiries.

—Lisa Shaver, Baylor University

It was with much anticipation that I began reading Nellie Arnott's Writing on Angola, 1905-1913: Missionary Narratives Linking Africa and America.  Most of Ms. Arnott's  time in Angola was spent on the then ABCFM mission station of Kamundongo in the highlands of the then Portuguese colony. Here she learned to function, as a teacher and evangelist, in Umbundu, the language of one of the major groups in Angola and, indeed, one of my “first” languages.   My eagerness was born of the fact that, of my seventeen years in Angola, I spent the first five in Kamundongo (decades after Ms. Arnott’s time), having been born nearby in Chissamba where the mission hospital had a doctor. A major pleasure, then, was the promise of reading about places and people that I would recognize, some because they lived on into my time, many others because of the oral histories recounted by my parents and their colleagues as well as by the parents and elders of my Umbundu friends.  My expectations were more than met.  For several days I read well into the night, scribbling notes I would develop in emails to the authors, and pausing to conjure up an event, face or place once so familiar to me.   For the events and situations recounted in Ms. Arnott’s letters, including her relationships with other missionaries, the Umbundu people and Portuguese authorities, the authors identify patterns and contexts that have enhanced my understanding of the first seventeen years of my life.  An instructive and personally rewarding read!

—Frank Collins, Ph.D., Victoria College, University of Toronto, Canada

About the Authors

Sarah Robbins is the Lorraine Sherley Professor of Literature at Texas Christian University and the author of Managing Literacy, Mothering America (Pittsburgh Press, 2006), which won a Choice award from the American Library Association. She is also the author of The Cambridge Introduction to Harriet Beecher Stowe (Cambridge, 2007). 

Ann Ellis Pullen is Professor of History, Emerita, at Kennesaw State University, where she chaired the Department of History and Philosophy and the Women's Studies Program. She has authored articles on the early twentieth-century interracial movement in the U.S. South in a variety of publications.

Contents

Abbreviations
Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Missionary Authorship as Network-Building
Part I: Contexts for Reading Nellie Arnott's Writing
1 Nellie Arnott Darling: Traveler in Mission Service
2 Mission Service in National and Transnational Contexts
3 Writing on Multiple Journeys
Part II The Public Writings of Nellie J. Arnott (Darling)
4 Traveling to Portuguese West Africa
5 Woman's Work at a Highlands Mission Station
6 Cultivating Networks of Influence
Appendix 1: Mission Publications' Editing of Arnott's Writing
Appendix 2: ABCFM Missionaries in Angola
Appendix 3: Image Citations and Explanatory Context
Bibliography
Index
About the Authors

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No Shape Bends the River So Long

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-626-9

Monica Berlin & Beth Marzoni

New Measure Poetry Prize Winner
Selected by Carolyn Forché

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-626-9 (paperback; $14) 978-1-60235-627-6 (PDF, $12) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 114 pages.

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Reviews and Interviews

Praise for No Shape Bends the River So Long

“What to make of this grand experiment over months and miles of river by two poets, not one—Monica Berlin and Beth Marzoni—plus whatever third spirit they’ve invented together? Like music from the 8th century written by Anonymous, that haunting ubiquitous voice, these poems feel unsettlingly interchangeable, keep coming like the country’s longest river dream-documented here in a rich rush, dense with repetition and sorrow by poets who ‘think like a glacier or a stone, sand . . . years / like consistent rain.’ The Mississippi never had better companions or more devoted ones, save Mark Twain perhaps, or more to the point, his troubled, star-crossed Huck. The sense of human and nonhuman history, even prehistory stuns, keeps bothering this shared-solitary work. ‘Wake to any weather & know that / long ago there also was.’ I’ll take that as rare solace.”

 —Marianne Boruch

“No Shape Bends the River So Long is a book of atmospheric turbulence and diminishing water levels, inner weather forecasts, dark and light, friendship, the stillness in waiting rooms, a river’s traffic—or what poets Monica Berlin and Beth Marzoni, a So & So in dialogue with us and each other, call ‘the rush of alongside & what is.’ In the zig-zag process of traveling the Mississippi River Valley, together they navigate with beauty and resonance the ‘hours of drought, of waiting, the new low- / watermarks of the lakes,’ the trees ‘that sound like rain & morning.’ This is ecopoetry, it is intimate conversation, it is meditation, the turning inward, the swinging back out from mind to world around the bend. I deeply respect and admire this book for its love of place; its tumbling, digressive progress; its glints of joy and thoughts too deep for tears.”

—Nancy Eimers

About the Authors

Monica Berlin & Beth Marzoni’s collaborations have been published in Boston Review, Colorado Review, Denver Quarterly, New Orleans Review, DIAGRAM, Better: Culture & Lit, Meridian, TYPO, Midwestern Gothic, Vela, & Water~Stone Review.

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On the Blunt Edge: Technology in Composition's History and Pedagogy

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-220-9

Edited by Shane Borrowman

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-220-9 (paperback, $30; £20; $31 CAD; €24; $30 AUS); 978-1-60235-221-6 (hardcover, $60; £40; $62 CAD; €48; $60 AUS); 978-1-60235-222-3 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20; £13; $21 CAD; €16; $20 AUS). © 2012 by Parlor Press. 200 pages, with illustrations, notes, bibliographies, and index.

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When modern discussions of technology arise in rhetoric and composition studies, the topic is almost always related to computers—despite their comparatively recent development and deployment in this millennia-old profession. Computers themselves are new; composition’s rush to emergent technologies is not. New teachers face expectations that they will master everything from word processing to the multi-modal essay, from Aristotle’s Rhetoric to the classroom whiteboard. While little can be done immediately to change such unrealistic and unreasonable expectations, teachers and scholars can benefit greatly from considering the place such expectations and technologies have in the larger and longer flow of rhetoric and composition studies—from the technology of road building in the ancient world, which allowed students to travel to school from afar, to the technology of handwriting, now largely falling by the wayside. From this past emerge fresh perspectives on the future of writing technologies in the digital age.

The story of technology in composition’s history and pedagogy is one of stability and change, of short-term success and long-term failure. The essays in On the Blunt Edge: Technology in Composition’s History and Pedagogy tell the story of rhetoric and composition’s long and intriguing relationship with writing technologies, revealing the ways that they have transformed the teaching and understanding of writing throughout history. Contributors include Shane Borrowman, Richard Leo Enos, Daniel R. Fredrick, Richard W. Rawnsley, Shawn Fullmer, Kathleen Blake Yancey, Joseph Jones, Sherry Rankins Robertson, Duane Roen, Marcia Kmetz, Robert Lively, Crystal Broch-Colombini, Thomas Black, Jason Thompson, and Theresa Enos.

About the Editor

Shane Borrowman is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Montana Western, where he teaches composition and creative nonfiction. He is editor or co-editor of numerous collections, including Trauma and the Teaching of Writing (SUNY, 2005), The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration (Parlor Press, 2008), and Rhetoric in the Rest of the West (Cambridge Scholars, 2010). Additionally, he is editor/co-editor of multiple first-year composition textbooks and readers. His nonfiction has appeared in publications ranging from Brevity and Conclave: A Journal of Character to Whitefish Review and Rhetoric Review.

Contents

Introduction: Process and Place, Technology in a Glass
Shane Borrowman

1 Writing Without Paper: A Study of Functional Rhetoric in Ancient Athens
Richard Leo Enos

2 Adsum Magister: The Technology of Transportation in Rhetorical Education
Daniel R. Fredrick

3 Motivations for the Development of Writing Technology
Richard W. Rawnsley

4 “The Next Takes the Machine”: Typewriter Technology and the Transformation of Teaching 
Shawn Fullmer

5 Handwriting, Literacy, and Technology
Kathleen Blake Yancey

6 “Making the Devil Useful”: Audio-Visual Aids and the Teaching of Writing
Joseph Jones

7 Textbooks and Their Pedagogical Influences in Higher Education: A Bibliographic Essay
Sherry Rankins Robertson and Duane Roen

8 Disciplining Technology: A Selective Annotated Bibliography
Marcia Kmetz, Robert Lively, Crystal Broch-Colombini, and Thomas Black

9 The Rhetoric of Obfuscation and Technologies of Hidden Writing: Poets and Palimpsests, Painters and Purposes
Jason Thompson and Theresa Enos

Index
Contributors

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Oral Communication in the Disciplines: A Resource for Teacher Development and Training

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-852-2

Deanna P. Dannels, Patricia R. Palmerton, and Amy L. Housley Gaffney

With an Epilogue by Chris M. Anson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-852-2 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-853-9 (hardcover, $65); 978-1-60235-854-6 (PDF on CD or by email, $20). © 2017 by Parlor Press. 266 pages with notes, bibliography, and illustrations.

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Description

Oral Communication in the Disciplines: A Resource for Teacher Development and Training is divided into three sections. The first section provides a rationale for using oral communication as an instructional tool in various courses and briefly summarizes the strategic framework for the book. This section also identifies two kinds of oral communication assignments/activities, each of which address different instructional outcomes—informal communication activities to facilitate interrogation of course content, and more formal communication activities designed to explicitly develop communication competence. Each of the chapters includes decision-making templates and a number of examples of activities and assignments from various disciplines that could support these goals. The second section addresses student performance complexities unique to oral communication assignments and activities (e.g., managing apprehension, facilitating discussion, navigating group/team work, dealing with difficult interactions, and addressing diversity). Each of these chapters draws on communication research and provides pedagogical strategies for helping students manage the complexities when they emerge. The third section of the book discusses evaluation of oral communication assignments, feedback, and general assessment concerns related to evaluating oral communication. This section provides various strategies for creating rubrics, providing responses, and giving feedback on oral communication activities and assignments.

What People Are Saying

This book is timely and much needed. As the writing across the curriculum movement has grown, so has the awareness that we need to address students' oral communication as well as their writing skills if they are to fully develop as effective communicators. Faculty in all disciplines will find this book an excellent resource. —Dr. Susan McLeod, Research Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara

Singular in intent and timing, Oral Communication in the Disciplines provides faculty and administrators in higher education a well-thought framework for advancing students' oral communication skills in disciplinary contexts. The authors highlight key instructional decisions that underlie effective oral assignments and offer clear options and examples to guide faculty in their individual practice. Readers will further value the thoughtful reflections on student-faculty interaction articulated in this work. —Dr. Sean Connin, Director, The Collaborative of Teaching and Learning, Trinity University

Dannels, Palmerton, and Gaffney have written the book that has been needed for years as we began to explore communication across and in the discipline. I frequently hear the concerns and questions from faculty that the authors address here. Additionally, the authors offer great strategies for partnering with faculty to incorporate CXC goals into their courses. As the co-leader of a faculty development seminar focused on this topic, I am thrilled to have this as a resource and to be able to recommend this book to faculty. —Dr. Wendy Atkins-Sayre, Associate Professor and Director, Southern Mississippi Speaking Center, University of Southern Mississippi

Dannels, Palmerton and Gaffney have compiled the perfect text for colleagues from across the campus who find themselves called to teach communication. As nationally recognized leaders in communication across the curriculum, these authors offer information and advice steeped in good solid research and years of classroom and cross-curricular experience. —Dr. Ann L. Darling, Assistant Vice President, Undergraduate Studies, University of Utah

It is a challenge to engage my undergraduate engineering students in oral communication, let alone increase their awareness of the importance of communication in the discipline—especially in an age of decreasing face-to-face communication. This book not only provides a number of ways to implement communication assignments, but it also explains the value of doing so. Additionally, this book goes further in addressing more subtle issues such as how to manage facework in my classroom, and how to deal with inevitable conflict students might face when doing oral communication assignments. It is an outstanding reference. —Dr. Jon P. Rust, Professor of Textile Engineering, Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor, North Carolina State University

Working with engineering students in a career services capacity, I see the need for students to feel confident communicating in the real world. While many colleges and universities have very strong communication programs, STEM students won't learn communication skills specific to their fields simply by taking a required general education course. These students need to be introduced to applications specific to what they'll face in a work environment and hence faculty and staff need to be skilled in integrating oral communication into their curriculum. I am confident that Oral Communication in the Disciplines: A Resource for Teacher Development and Training can provide the guiding philosophy for instructors who are outside of the field of communication, ultimately resulting in well-rounded students in every discipline. —Krysta Kirsch, Employer Relations and Recruiting Manager, Engineering Career Services, The Ohio State University

Oral Communication in the Disciplines: A Resource for Teacher Development and Training is the first of its kind to provide a clear and straightforward strategic framework to guide teachers as they incorporate oral communication activities into their course. This all-encompassing empirically and theoretically grounded book helps to ensure that communication is not just added, but thoughtfully incorporated in meaningful, context-specific ways. The practical examples and planning worksheets will guide the most inexperienced instructors and also help experienced teachers to rethink and re-evaluate their activities and assignments. The incorporation of facework and feedback helps to demystify the evaluation process. This book is a must-have for any instructor who wants to incorporate meaningful oral communication activities. —Dr. April Kedrowicz, Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University

About the Authors

Deanna P. Dannels is Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor in the Department of Communication at North Carolina State University. She is the author of the book Eight Essential Questions Teachers Ask: A Guidebook for Communicating with Students. Patricia R. Palmerton is Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication Studies at Hamline University, Saint Paul, Minnesota. Amy L. Housley Gaffney (PhD, Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media, North Carolina State University, 2010) is director of the Oral Communication Center at Hamilton College.

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Out of Mind

$14.99
SKU: 978-1-60235-598-9

A "Blue" Mystery


Michael Burke

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-598-9 (paperback; $14.99) 978-1-60235-599-6 (Adobe eBook and ePub versions coming December 2014) © 2014 by Parlor Press. 188 pages.

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Download the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format).

Description

Detective Johnny “Blue” Heron is lured away from stargazing on his fire escape by a wealthy socialite who wants to track down her husband’s lover. It appears to be a straightforward task for a private investigator, but the trail quickly muddies. Blue is chased by hit men and seduced by the suspected lover. A fight in an abandoned pipe factory, a headless body on the railroad tracks, and the curious involvement of homeless kittens makes Out of Mind a fascinating read. Michael Burke has produced a fast moving mystery that combines a tightly woven plot with Blue’s philosophical musing, sexual shenanigans, and humor.

What People Are Saying

“Thomas Pynchon and Dashiell Hammett walk into a bar: Michael Burke is channeling the results right here in Out of Mind. It is a lively trip—wit with intrigue, graft with grins. I laughed out loud at the “ten-story glass office building” which is “named after our ex-Mayor Norton Montgomery—no one had bothered to change its name after he went to jail.” And, like his wife Louella, I too wondered what Larry Lafonte was up to. Johnny ‘Blue’ Heron, his Beamer, and the aging pony-tailed hippy LeRoy are back. Burke writes like a really great conversationalist at a party, and you’re invited! Glorious reading!”

—Graeme Harper, author of The Invention of Dying and Moon Dance

“In Out of Mind, Michael Burke’s third novel in the series, we are charmed once again by the eccentric macho tenderness of protagonist Johnny ‘Blue‘ Heron. Blue would opt every day for a romantic martini with Kathy over a murder. Yet beyond the laconic style of Burke’s hero, and obvious literary skill, this book is extremely well plotted, with an unforgettable erotic scene in a cornfield. Bravo Mr. Burke—who, we are not surprised, is also a sculptor, scientist, and poet. We want more of the seductive and mysterious Mr. Heron.”

—Margaret Sheffield, author of The Expressive Edge

About the Author

Michael Burke has traveled through a number of careers since he graduated from college. The first was as an astronomer, working at observatories in the U.S., Hawaii, and Iran. He then went back to school to obtain a Master’s Degree in City Planning. He worked in New York City’s Planning Department and later became an Assistant Professor at Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture and City Planning. Michael changed direction again when he found a loft in Soho and began to paint. He has been an artist for more than thirty years—painting, drawing, and lately producing aluminum books and sculpture. He has exhibited his work extensively in the U.S., Japan, and Europe. Although he has written and published poetry over the years, Michael has only recently arrived on the mystery scene. Swan Dive was published in 2009 and Music of the Spheres in 2011. Out of Mind, the further adventures of detective Johnny “Blue” Heron, is the third book in the series.

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Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-591-0

Edited by D. Gilson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-591-0 (paperback, $27) 978-1-60235-592-7 (PDF, $20) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 242 pages, with illustrations.

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Description

Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed brings together 154 remixes of William Shakespeare's 1609 sonnet sequence. If Shakespeare the auteur and his sonnets have influenced so much of how we think (and act) as humans, this collection asks how might we be un- (and re-) done by the conscious act of responding to (or through) these seventeenth-century verses. Here you will find a wide variety of remixes: entries various by their form — poems, short essays, comics, songs, and art; and various by their remixer — poets, essayists, artists, musicians, and scholars. Here you will walk into a queer utopia, a place where things and people touch, though they are too often taught not to.

In these pages, Shakespeare meets Paul Simon and snaps selfies. He advertises on fast food billboards and watches Big Brother. He runs for town alderman and masturbates and shares custody of a child with an ex. In her afterword, Ayanna Thompson explains, "Remixing, by its very name, assumes that a queer blending already always exists (the mix). One is simply mixing anew what was already mixed up before; there is never an a priori moment in mixing." This collection remixes what we've always been consumed with, reaching back to Shakespeare's "original" sequence, while also bringing to bare how that consumption is unique in the twenty-first century.

About the Editor

D. Gilson is the author of I Will Say This Exactly One Time: Essays (Sibling Rivalry, 2015); Crush with Will Stockton (Punctum Books, 2014); Brit Lit (Sibling Rivalry, 2013); and Catch & Release (2012), winner of the Robin Becker Prize. He is Assistant Professor of English at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, and his work has appeared in PANK, The Indiana Review, The Rumpus, and as a notable essay in Best American Essays.

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Price: $27.00

Overyellow

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-897-3

The Poem as Installation Art

Nicolas Pesquès

Translated by Cole Swensen
The North Face of Juliau, Six

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-897-3 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-898-0 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 96 pages, in English, translated from the French

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Reviews

Rob McLennan's Blog (25 March 2017)

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Description

Overyellow is part of a series that Nicolas Pesquès has been writing over the past twenty-five years; beginning with a mountain that he sees outside his study window in the Ardèche region of France, Pesquès uses an evocation of nature to reflect upon the nature of language and its tendency to separate us from immanent experience. The overyellow of the title refers to the brilliant color of the fragrant English broom that flowers all over the mountain every June. Subtle inter-relations of various powers, from the personal to the universal, create a meditative weave that accommodates both vivid imagery and philosophical speculation.

A bit in the way that Cezanne used Mont Sainte-Victoire as an anchor that allowed him a greater range of artistic exploration, Pesquès returns again and again to his mountain to keep his free-wheeling linguistic experimentation well-grounded, creating a dynamic between concrete presence and abstract investigation that, by carefully avoiding equilibrium, keeps both poles in invigorating play.

About the Poet

Nicolas Pesquès (www.nicolas-pesques.fr) is the author of some fifteen volumes of poetry, the two most recent published by Flammarion. His work over the past twenty years constitutes a long meditation on the nature of language considered in relation to a mountain, Juliau, in south-central France. Two previous volumes from this series have been published in English translation—Physis (Parlor Press, 2006) and Juliology (Counterpath, 2008).

About the Translator

Cole Swensen (www.coleswensen.com) is the author of sixteen books of poetry, most recently Landscapes on a Train (Nightboat, 2015) and Gravesend (University of California, 2012). Her work has won the National Poetry Series, the Iowa Poetry Prize, and the S.F. State Poetry Center Book Award and has been short-listed for both the National Book Award and the L.A. Times Book Award. This is her 20th book-length translation of contemporary French experimental work. She has won the PEN USA Award in Literary Translation and has been short-listed three times for the Best Translated Book Award and once for the National Translation Award. She teaches at Brown University.

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Pilgrimage Suites

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-864-5

Derek Gromadzki

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-864-5 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-865-2 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 75 pages, in English.

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Description

Reading itself is travel in Derek Gromadzki’s first book, Pilgrimage Suites, an outing across an insular medieval landscape as rich in its registers of language as in its flora or fauna. This book is neither history nor story, though it retains characteristics of each. Like history, it perpetuates retrograde speculation while maintaining the narrated sequencing of incident that is the common stock and trade of story. In the heyday of medieval pilgrimages, English underwent radical changes. The Latinate speech of Church officialdom ran roughly up against a vernacular with deep Germanic and Brythonic roots. These suites track an imagined journey over the landscape that staged the violence of this conflict, whereon strikingly beautiful monuments stood in the aftermath. To the cultural clashes and assimilations materially manifest in the Romanesque and Gothic cathedrals travelers still venerate today, Gromadzki offers an overlooked parallel through creative strife with sound. He uses the momentum generated in running the lexical and rhythmic possibilities of English’s varied sources together to stretch and sustain the lyric over a pastoral background to push each of these two modes past its respective limits.

What People Are Saying

A severely crafted tapestry invites us to “lie down on the wings of swifts wheeling” over the rich and varied vocabulary of English. An airier form of pilgrimage than the traditional “walking waking,” but all the same a pilgrimage: through language—and to language, which endures through its very changes whereas, as the epigraph tells us, “Him as was has gone from we.” Derek Gromadzki travels its distance. —Rosemarie Waldrop

At first, Derek Gromadzki’s Pilgrimage Suites strikes the reader as the continuation of some line running parallel to the line from which most contemporary American poetry branches. Although occasionally Pilgrimage Suites references that line—Susan Howe, Nathaniel Mackey, and, more quietly, Hart Crane, haunt this book—gradually, the reader discovers that it is not the continuation of any pre-existing line, but the beginning of its own. This poetry cannot be found anywhere else—as is the case with any successful new poetry, it could not have been imagined before it came to be, and its absence cannot be imagined now. —Shane McCrae

What happens gradually is a dialect never spoken of a language never finished, which this poet adds to, tough “thews of melody” pressed to relay experience half in and half out of chronicle, in exacting objectivist care with syllable and swerve. This book of glad orderings energizes archaic tongues to lyric brilliance. What a mirror for poets today!—Mark McMorris

About the Poet

Derek Gromadzki is the recipient of an MFA in poetry from the Literary Arts Program at Brown University and an MFA in literary translation from the Translation Workshop at the University of Iowa, where he is currently a PhD candidate in comparative literature. His latest translations, collaborations with Sayuri Okamoto, can be found in Alice, Iris, Red Horse: Selected Poems of Yoshimasu Gozo (New Directions, 2016).

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Pilgrimly

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-481-4

Siobhán Scarry

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-481-4 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-482-1 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2014 by Parlor Press. 77 pages.

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Reviews and Interviews


Listen to the interview with Siobhán Scarry at Radio Free Albion. (11 Aug. 2015)

Ann, Kimberly. New Pages. 4 May 2015. http://www.newpages.com/item/29565-pilgrimly

Praise for Pilgrimly . . .

These are luminous, complicated poems. Crystalline. Turn them one way, they are full of blackberry brambles, ecotonalities, the banks where water laps with land. Another way and they are dusts and yet whale songs too. Yet another, women and words. They are written mainly in sentences. They are quiet and they enthrall.

—Juliana Spahr, one of the authors of Army of Lovers

Attentive to telling detail. The metallic bloom of bright silences. Hieratic: Instructions for a vigil. Augury: We could ruminate, luxuriate, and divinate in the language of these exquisite poems.  They give the light with their own eyes. There is gold on their tongues. Their words marry, or refer. Lure or long. In the alchemical brilliance of Siobhán Scarry’s stunning debut collection, we walk the page as if the earth, feeling each word a footstep, and each footstep marking our Pilgrimly progress. How surely the poems move us to their spacious pilgrimage. Offer proof of Presence. Fiery. Cerebrally.

—Cynthia Hogue, author of Or Consequence and Flux

Pilgrimly exposes our hidden attachments to things and places, seasons and weather. Even our most sentimental passions turn startling and strange when rendered by Scarry’s exacting syntax, her crisp images also gifting them with photographic accuracy. “A yellow swing and a root cellar with jars,” she writes, “Not everything had a language.” This lack of language makes relations to the world of objects both comforting and perplexing, home and unheimlich, and what I love about this book is how profoundly we encounter, by virtue of Scarry’s masterful phrasing, the feel of the small scale of that world where “dead bolts turn . . . over in their brass beds.” This is a book to which we must put an ear.  

—Brian Teare, author of Companion Grasses

About the Author

Siobhán Scarry earned an MFA in creative writing from the University of Montana and a PhD in Poetics from SUNY Buffalo. Her poems have appeared in Colorado Review, jubilat, New Letters, Sentence: A Journal of Prose Poetics, and elsewhere. She lives and teaches in the Pacific Northwest.

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Placing the History of College Writing: Stories from the Incomplete Archive

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-801-0

Nathan Shepley

Perspectives on Writing
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Rich Rice

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-801-0 (paperback, $27); 978-1-60235-802-7 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-803-4 (PDF; $20. © 2016 by Nathan Shepley. 162 pages with glossary and bibliography.

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Reviews

New Books and MIT's Uncommon Sense by Barbara Fister. Inside Higher Ed. 29 Mar. 2016

Description

In Placing the History of College Writing, Nathan Shepley argues that pre-1950s composition history, if analyzed with the right conceptual tools, can pluralize and clarify our understanding of the relationship between the writing of college students and the writing’s physical, social, and discursive surroundings. Even if the immediate outcome of student writing is to generate academic credit, Shepley shows, the writing does more complex rhetorical work. It gives students chances to uphold or adjust institutional codes for student behavior, allows students and their literacy sponsors to respond to sociopolitical issues in a city or state, enables faculty and administrators to create strategic representations of institutional or program identities, and connects people across disciplines, occupations, and geographic locations. Shepley argues that even if many of today’s composition scholars and instructors work at institutions that lack extensive historical records of the kind usually preferred by composition historians, those scholars and teachers can mine their institutional collections for signs of the various contexts with which student writing dealt.

About the Author

Nathan Shepley is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Houston, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Rhetoric and Composition. In addition to composition history, his specialization areas include composition pedagogy and ecological and neosophistic theories of writing. His articles have appeared in Composition Studies, Enculturation, Composition Forum, and Open Words: Access and English Studies.

Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
1 Placing History, Historicizing Place
2 Customizing Composition: Students Broadening Behavioral Codes
3 Tracking Lines of Communication: Student Writing as a Response to Civic Issues
4 Composition on Display: Students Performing College Competence
5 Rethinking Links Between Histories of Composition
6 Composition as Literacy, Discourse, and Rhetoric

Works Cited
Glossary

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Play/Write: Digital Rhetoric, Writing, Games

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-731-0

Edited by Douglas Eyman and Andréa D. Davis

Electracy and Transmedia Studies
Edited by Jan Rune Holmevik and Cynthia Haynes

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-731-0 (paperback, $34.00) 978-1-60235-732-7 (hardcover, $70.00); 978-1-60235-733-4 (Adobe eBook, $20). © 2016 by Parlor Press, with illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index. 388 pages.

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Description

Play/Write: Digital Rhetoric, Writing Games presents a wide range of approaches to digital video games as sites of composition and rhetorical performance. The chapters in Play/Write examine writing—both textual and multimodal—and rhetorical activity that takes place within games as player-game and player-player interactions, as well as external sites of writing, such as player communities, corporate-supported transmedia storytelling, walkthroughs, cheats, and documentation. The final sections of Play/Write consider the writing of games and the use of games as platforms for rhetorical actions. Following a new materialist approach, the key concept that all of these approaches build upon is that games operate in rhetorical ecologies that include designers, players, texts, communities, and the procedures of the gameplay mechanics and the operations of the games themselves. Contributors include Eric Alexander, Phill Alexander, James J. Brown, Jr., Kym Buchanan, Richard Colby, Rebekah Shultz Colby, Sean Conrey, Andréa D. Davis, Jessica Masri Eberhard, Douglas Eyman, Grace Hagood, Steven Holmes, Brian Ladd, Jill Morris, Scott Nelson, Joshua Peery, David M. Sheridan, Lee Sherlock, Wendi Sierra, Brandes Stoddard, and Emily Stuemke.

Praise for Play/Write

“Despite what some players, creators, and critics may think or even hope, games do not exist in a cloister, separated from the rest of the media ecosystem. Play/Write: Digital Rhetoric, Writing, Games presents a welcome connection between games and rhetoric, through the lens of different types of writing. The result shows how we think to talk about games is as important as how we play them.” —Ian Bogost

“Playing with words and semiotics within rule systems to defined and purposeful ends has always been the domain of rhetoric and composition. Combine verbal play with digital play and you have the important contribution that Eyman and Davis present in Play/Write: Digital Rhetoric, Writing, Games. Gaming asks audiences to take up an active subjectivity as an audience, co-creating the unfolding of texts. These activities, then, provide audiences an excellent transition from consumers to producers, players to makers. And this is the strength of this collection. Eyman and Davis have brought together a dynamic group of scholars who prove that the skills of analysis and production in rhetoric and composition can add new insight into game studies, and likewise, the act of writing about games, writing for games, and composing in the multimedia spaces afforded by games can highlight agency, theory, and ethics in game studies writ large. A must have book for anyone considering computer games in the classroom.” —Jennifer deWinter

About the Editors

Douglas Eyman is an avid player of online role playing games and has previously published work on the digital ecologies and economies of video games. His most recent work, Digital Rhetoric: Theory, Method, Practice maps the growing field of digital rhetoric, including its relationship to the study of video games as platforms for the performance of writing and rhetoric. He is also the senior editor and publisher of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy.

Andréa D. Davis, an aficionado and expert player of World of Warcraft, earned her PhD in digital and cultural rhetorics from Michigan State University. Andréa is co-editor of Metamorphosis: The Effects of Professional Development on Graduate Students and served as Kairos Praxis editor from 2006 to 2012

Contents and Contributors

1 "Introduction: Networks of Gaming and Writing" by Douglas Eyman

Part I: Game Rhetorics and Gaming Pedagogies (or, Writing About Games)
2 "Aleatory Invention and Glorious Trainwrecks' Accursed Share" by Steven Holmes
3 "'What Do You Mean None of My Choices Mattered?': Collaborative Composition and the Ethics of Ownership in Games—A Case Study of Mass Effect 3" by Jessica Masri Eberhard
4 "The Composing Practices and Rhetorical Acumen of MMORPG Players: What City of Heroes Means for Writing Instruction" by Phill Alexander
5 "Procedurality as Play: Movement in Games and Composition" by Grace Hagood

Part II: Game Ecologies and Networks (or, Writing Around Games)
6 "Who's That Walking on My Bridge? Transmedia Shifts and Trolling in Game Forums" by Richard Colby and Rebekah Shultz Colby
7 "Data vs. Play: The Digital Rhetorics of Theorycrafting" by Lee Sherlock
8 "Intellectual Property Pong: Three Classic Matches That Affect Your Play Today" by Scott Nelson

Part III: Games and/as Rhetorical Production (or, Writing In or Through Games)
9 "'Leeroy Jenkins!' What Computer Gamers Can Teach Us about Visual Arguments" by Andréa D. Davis
10 "Playing with Play: Machinima in the Classroom" by Wendi Sierra
11 "VoIP, Composition, and Membership: Constructing Working Identities through Collaborative Play" by Emily Stuemke
12 "Gaming Between Civic Knowledge and Civic Know-How: Direct Engagement and the Simulated City" by Sean Conrey

Part IV: Composing Games in Industry and Classroom Contexts (or, Writing Games)
13 "Narrative Realities and Alternate Zombies: A Student-Centered Alternate Reality Gam"e by Jill Morris
14 "Procedural Rhetoric, Proairesis, Game Design, and the Revaluing of Invention" by James J. Brown, Jr. and Eric Alexander
15 "Games and the Search for "Contextually Valid Settings" in the Writing Classroom" by David M. Sheridan and Kym Buchanan
16 "Programming, Pedagogy, Play" by Brian Ladd
17 "Writing for Games" by Brandes Stoddard
18 "Game Writing in Practice-MMORPG Quests" by Joshua Peery

Contributors
Index

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Po H# on Dope to Ph.D.: How Education Saved My Life

$22.95
SKU: 978-0-9840429-7-5

Elaine Richardson, Ph.D.

New Community Press
Distributed by Parlor Press

Information and Pricing
978-0-9840429-7-5 (paperback, $22.95, £16; $23 CAD; €19; 23 AUD); 978-1-60235-426-5 (Adobe eBook, $20; £14;  $34 CAD; €16; $20 AUD). © 2013 by Elaine Richardson. 263 pages with illustrations.

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 How Education Saved My LifeDownload the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format).


Interviews

Listen to the inverview with Dr. E. on the Tavis Smiley show (2014).

What People Are Saying

There was a time when Elaine Richardson was one of ‘the Negroes everybody pointed to as the Negroes you didn’t want to become.’ The title of this book is no metaphor or allusion, but a literal shorthand for a remarkable, unpredictable journey. She inherits a plain way of talking about horrific pain from a mother who seemed impossible to shock. The way too fast way she grew up was and is too common, but her will to remap her destiny is uncommon indeed. To call her story inspiring would be itself too plain a thing, hers is a heroic life. —dream hampton, writer and filmmaker

Hers is a story of triumph against all odds. —Anita D. Diggs, Review, African American Literature Book Club (June, 2013)

A deeply revealing, emotional and inspiring memoir, PHD (Po H# on Dope) to PhD: How Education Saved My Life is a must read for everyone, especially young women. —R. Lee Gamble, Phenomenal Woman Magazine (June, 2013, p. 6)

About the Author

Dr. Elaine Richardson, aka Dr. E. and Professor of Literacy Studies in the College of Education and Human Ecology at The Ohio State University, is focused on literacy education of African American and African diasporic people, and specializes in critical language and literacy education for social equality. Richardson belongs to a global network of Hiphop activist-educators for social transformation. She founded The Ohio State University Hiphop Literacies Conference and the SistaFriends Afterschool Program in 2011 (currently serving sixth to eighth grade girls at Sherwood Middle school). Richardson uses her story of recovery from human trafficking and drugs to becoming an award winning PhD and recording artist to motivate others. Richardson’s bachelor's and master's degrees are from Cleveland State University and her doctorate from Michigan State University. She has won awards from the National Council of Negro Women, City of Columbus, and Cleveland State University, and other organizations.

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Poems from above the Hill: Selected Poems of Ashur Etwebi

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-160-8

Ashur Etwebi

Translated by Brenda Hillman and Diallah Haidar

Free Verse Editions
Series Editor: Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-160-8 (paperback, $14; £10, $15 CAD, €12, $16 AUS); 978-1-60235-161-5 (Adobe eBook, $12, £9, $13 CAD, €10, $14 AUS). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 134 pages.

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Description

Ashur Etwebi is one of Libya’s leading writers. A poet, novelist, and translator, he has published six books of poetry, two novels, and three books of translation.

Etwebi compactly renders experience in a hauntingly classical way. His work is rooted in the landscapes of his country, and in inventing forms in his literary traditions that will capture his engagement with his place and culture. His poetry is intimate but grand, innovative but traditional, influenced by Modernist poetry . . . yet populist and accessible. His phrasing and syntax are often very unpredictable, risk-taking, experimenting with neologisms, inventing language. In his work, there is often a strongly elegiac note; his irony reminds one of Eliot, his imagistic purity reminds one of Pound. Yet he has an intimate knowledge of his fellow creatures that brings to mind William Carlos Williams. Ashur Etwebi enters the mysterious places of the land and sea through the experiences of the human beings he encounters, never engaging in sentimental homage but putting forward a powerful and delicious reverie and a poetic vision.

—Brenda Hillman (from her Translator’s Note)

About the Translators

Brenda Hillman is the author of eight collections of poetry, the most recent of which is Practical Water. She is the Olivia C. Filippi Professor of Poetry at Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, California.

Diallah Haidar is a Lebanese-American and a native speaker of Arabic. She graduated from the University of California Berkeley with a BA degree in English Literature and in Near Eastern Studies. She received her MA degree from Columbia University in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies.

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Practicing Theory in Second Language Writing

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-138-7

Edited by Tony Silva and Paul Kei Matsuda

Practicing Theory in Second Language Writing coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-138-7 (paperback, $32.; £21, €23, $36 AUS, $34 CAD); 978-1-60235-139-4 (hardcover, $65.00; £42; €46; $72 AUS; $68 CAD); 978-1-60235-140-0 (Adobe eBook, $20.00; £13; €14; $22 AUS; $21 CAD). © 2010 by Parlor Press. 330 pages with notes, bibliography, illustrations, tables, and index.

Second Language Writing
Series Editor, Paul Kai Matsuda

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Description

Theory has been used widely in the field of second language writing. Second language writing specialists—teachers, researchers, and administrators—have yet to have an open and sustained conversation about what theory is, how it works, and, more important, how to practice theory. Practicing Theory in Second Language Writing features fourteen essays by distinguished scholars in second language writing who explore various aspects of theoretical work that goes on in the field.

The key  issues addressed in Practicing Theory in Second Language Writing include the nature of theory in second language writing and the role theory plays in second language writing research, instruction, and administration; the possibility and desirability of developing a comprehensive theory or theories of second language writing; applications of theory, including the advantages, disadvantages, and limitations of adapting theories from other areas of inquiry to second language writing research, instruction, and assessment; theorizing and building theory, including the ways in which second language writing teachers, researchers, and administrators develop theories of second language writing, what a theory of second language writing might look like; the relationship between the conceptual work of theorizing and data-driven theory building; practicing theory, including how second language writing teachers, researchers, and administrators might address theory; the practical issues of learning to work with theory; and the ways that theory informs instruction and administration as well as materials development.

Contributors include Dwight Atkinson, Diane Belcher, A. Suresh Canagarajah, Joan Carson, Deborah Crusan, Alister Cumming, Doug Flahive, Lynn M. Goldstein, Linda Harklau, John Hedgcock, Alan Hirvela, Ryuko Kubota, Paul Kei Matsuda, Lourdes Ortega, Dudley W. Reynolds, Tony Silva, Christine Tardy, Gwendolyn Williams, and Wei Zhu

About the Editors

Tony Silva is a Professor in the Department of English at Purdue University, where he directs and teaches courses in the Graduate Program in ESL and the ESL Writing Program. He co-edited the Journal of Second Language Writing from 1992 to 2007 and has served as the co-host of the Symposium on Second Language Writing since 1998. He has co-edited four books, co-authored another, and published his work in such journals as the Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, College Composition and Communication, ELT Journal, Modern Language Journal, TESOL Quarterly, and Written Communication.

Paul Kei Matsuda is Associate Professor of English at Arizona State University. Founding co-chair of the Symposium on Second Language Writing and Editor of the Parlor Press Series on Second Language Writing, he has published widely on second language writing in a wide variety of edited collections as well as journals such as such as College Composition and Communication, Composition Studies, Computers and Composition,College English, English for Specific Purposes, International Journal of Applied Linguistics, Journal of Basic Writing, Journal of Second Language Writing, and Written Communication.

Contents

Introduction
Tony Silva and Paul Kei Matsuda

Part I. The Nature and Role of Theory in Second Language Writing

1 Between Theory with a Big T and Practice with a Small p: Why Theory Matters
Dwight Atkinson

2 Theories, Frameworks, and Heuristics: Some Reflections on Inquiry and Second Language Writing
Alister Cumming

3 Multicompetence, Social Context, and L2 Writing Research Praxis
Lourdes Ortega and Joan Carson

4 Finding “Theory” in the Particular: An “Autobiography” of What I Learned and How about Teacher Feedback
Lynn M. Goldstein

Part II. Reflections on Theoretical Practices

5 Practicing Theory in Qualitative Research on Second Language Writing
Linda Harklau and Gwendolyn Williams

6 Cleaning up the Mess: Perspectives from a Novice Theory Builder
Christine Tardy

7 A Reconsideration of Contents of “Pedagogical Implications” and “Further Research Needed” Moves in the Reporting of Second Language Writing Research and Their Roles in Theory Building
Doug Flahive

8 Beyond Texts: A Research Agenda for Quantitative Research on Second Language Writers and Readers
Dudley W. Reynolds

9 Ideology and Theory in Second Language Writing: A Dialogical Treatment
A. Suresh Canagarajah

10 Critical Approaches to Theory in Second Language Writing: A Case of Critical Contrastive Rhetoric
Ryuko Kubota

11 Theory and Practice in Second Language Writing: How and Where Do They Meet?
Wei Zhu

12 Theory-and-Practice and Other Questionable Dualisms in L2 Writing
John Hedgcock

13 Assess Thyself Lest Others Assess Thee
Deborah Crusan

14 “Do I Need a Theoretical Framework?” Doctoral Students’ Perspectives on the Role of Theory in Dissertation Research and Writing
Diane Belcher and Alan Hirvela

Contributors
About the Editors

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Reading Graphs, Maps, and Trees: Responses to Franco Moretti

$18.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-205-6

Edited by Jonathan Goodwin and John Holbo

A Valve Book Event

Glassbead Books
Edited by John Holbo

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-205-6 (paperback, $18, £13, $19 CAD, €15, $19 AUS); © 2011 by Parlor Press and respective authors, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. 256 pages.

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-206-3 (Adobe ebook $12, £9, $13 CAD, €11, $13 AUS)
(Free for download in PDF format; 1.2 MB, free online at the Parlor Press website or at Scribd)

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Description

Franco Moretti’s Graphs, Maps, Trees: Abstract Models for Literary History is one of the most provocative recent works of literary history. The present volume collects generalist and specialist, academic and nonacademic responses by statisticians, philosophers, historians, literary scholars and others. And Moretti’s responses to these responses. Originally written as contributions to an online book event hosted at The Valve (www.thevalve.org), and edited for this volume, these essays explore, extend and criticize many aspects of Franco Moretti’s work. They will be of interest to anyone interested in Moretti’s brand of “distant reading”; or in the prospects for quantitative approaches to literary style and genre; or recent interdisciplinary work in the humanities generally.

Contributors

Contributors: Bill Benzon, Tim Burke, Jenny Davidson, Ray Davis, Jonathan Goodwin, Eric Hayot, John Holbo, Steven Berlin Johnson, Matthew Kirschenbaum, Sean McCann, Franco Moretti, Adam Roberts, Cosma Shalizi.

About the Editors

Jonathan Goodwin is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He works on modernist literature, film, and narrative theory.

John Holbo is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the National University of Singapore and the author, with Belle Waring, of Reason and Persuasion: Three Dialogues by Plato (Pearson 2009).      

Creative Commons License
Reading Graphs, Maps, and Trees by Jonathan Goodwin and John Holbo is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at www.parlorpress.com.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.parlorpress.com.

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Reading Graphs, Maps, and Trees: Responses to Franco Moretti

Reading Graphs, Maps, and Trees: Responses to Franco Moretti or purchase a print copy here.

Franco Moretti’s Graphs, Maps, Trees: Abstract Models for Literary History is one of the most provocative recent works of literary history. The present volume collects generalist and specialist, academic and nonacademic responses by statisticians, philosophers, historians, literary scholars and others. And Moretti’s responses to these responses. Originally written as contributions to an online book event hosted at The Valve (www.thevalve.org), and edited for this volume, these essays explore, extend and criticize many aspects of Franco Moretti’s work. They will be of interest to anyone interested in Moretti’s brand of “distant reading”; or in the prospects for quantitative approaches to literary style and genre; or recent interdisciplinary work in the humanities generally.

Contributors

Contributors: Bill Benzon, Tim Burke, Jenny Davidson, Ray Davis, Jonathan Goodwin, Eric Hayot, John Holbo, Steven Berlin Johnson, Matthew Kirschenbaum, Sean McCann, Franco Moretti, Adam Roberts, Cosma Shalizi.

Reading Graphs, Maps, and Trees: Responses to Franco Moretti

Ready to Wear: A Rhetoric of Wearable Computers and Reality-Shifting Media

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-400-5

Isabel Pedersen

New Media Theory
Series Editor: Byron Hawk

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-400-5 (paperback, $27); 978-1-60235-401-2 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-402-9 (Adobe eBook on CD, $20). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 195 pages with illustrations, notes, and bibliography.

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What Other Are Saying . . .

Ready to Wear: A Rhetoric of Wearable Computers and Reality-Shifting Media surveys an immense range of emerging technologies, most of which have not even been mentioned in existing scholarship on rhetoric and new media. Pedersen performs a much-needed expansion of the field’s radar in an era of rapid innovation, planned obsolescence, and mind-blowing prototypes. —John Tinnell, University of Florida

Description

Ready to Wear: A Rhetoric of Wearable Computers and Reality-Shifting Media is a book about the future but geared to the present. More and more, we are asked to adopt new or future technologies before we ever see, touch, or experience them. This rhetoric of innovation and adoption goes beyond commercial advertising. Emergent or disruptive technologies are circulated and explored in social media, inventors’ blogs, news sources, popular culture, films, YouTube clips, TED talks, Kickstarter, and countless other media venues, often long before we get our hands on them.

Ready to Wear: A Rhetoric of Wearable Computers and Reality-Shifting Media explores how and to what ends wearable inventions and technologies augment or remix reality, as well as the claims used to promote them. As computer components shrink and our mobile culture normalizes, we wear computers on the body to create immersive experiences. Isabel Pedersen asks and answers questions that animate everyone: How is this augmented digital life construed and contextualized, and in what ways does it define our identity? What’s at stake in the arguments for wearable computers? What posthuman world does this rhetoric envision? Pedersen’s answers to these questions are provocative and timely.

About the Author

Isabel Pedersen is a Canada Research Chair in Digital Life, Media, and Culture and an Associate Professor at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. Currently, she holds a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Standard Grant for her research into reality-shifting media. She studies how computers and gadgets worn on the body frame reality for the wearer and alter the ways that people interact with others and participate in culture. She has presented at numerous academic conferences and published articles in international journals, including Semiotica, Social Semiotics, Biography, and Continuum. She has been interested in human-computer interaction ever since she spent her youth playing Pac-Man in the Yonge Street arcades of downtown Toronto.

Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Rhetoric, Reality-Shifting Media, and Imminence
Chapter 1 Mobile Devices, Movement, and Myth
Chapter 2 Transparency, Nanotechnology, and the Rhetorical Justification for Invisibility Inventions
Chapter 3 Interactivity, Wearability, and the Rhetoric of Proposed Brain-Machine Interfaces
Chapter 4 Augmented Memory, Digital Life, and Computers that Promise to Remember Everything
Chapter 5 Carryable Technologies, Participatory Culture, and Rhetorical Transformation
Conclusion
Notes
Works Cited

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Price: $27.00

Reconnecting Reading and Writing

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-459-3

Edited by Alice S. Horning and Elizabeth W. Kraemer

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition
Series Editors: Charles Bazerman, Mary Jo Reiff, and Anis Bawarshi

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-459-3 (paperback, $32), 978-1-60235-460-9 (hardcover, $65), 978-1-60235-461-6 (Adobe eBook on CD, $25). © 2013 by Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse. 339 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Reconnecting Reading and Writing explores the ways in which reading can and should have a strong role in the teaching of writing in college. Reconnecting Reading and Writing draws on broad perspectives from history and international work to show how and why reading should be reunited with writing in college and high school classrooms. It presents an overview of relevant research on reading and how it can best be used to support and enhance writing instruction. Reconnecting Reading and Writing also examines research in such areas as basic writing, second language learning, and information literacy to integrate reading in writing classrooms, as well as the impact of the new Common Core State Standards in K-12 schools and the digital revolution in the teaching of reading and writing together. Reconnecting Reading and Writing also offers practical advice on useful textbooks and appropriate classroom practices and, like other titles in the Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition series, includes a glossary, extensive bibliography, and index. Introduced by series editors Charles Bazerman, Mary Jo Reiff, and Anis Bawarshi, Reconnecting Reading and Writing includes contributions from editors Alice S. Horning and Elizabeth W. Kraemer, Jennifer Coon, Erik D. Drake, Jimmy Fleming, William Grabe, Cynthia R. Haller, Allison L. Harl, David A. Jolliffe, Kathleen Skomski, and Cui Zhang.

About the Editors

Alice S. Horning is a professor in the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at Oakland University. Her research focuses on the nature of reading and writing and recent changes to literacy resulting from technological developments. Reconnecting Reading and Writing is her second in the Reference Guides series, following Revision (2006). Elizabeth W. Kraemer is Associate Professor and Coordinator of Instruction in Kresge Library at Oakland University. Her articles have appeared in The Journal of Academic Librarianship, College & Research Libraries, The Reference Librarian, College & Undergraduate Libraries, Information Technology and Libraries, and College & Research Libraries News.

Contents

Series Editors’ Preface
Charles Bazerman, Mary Jo Reiff, and Anis Bawarshi

Part I: Overview
1 Reconnecting Reading and Writing: Introduction and Overview
Alice S. Horning and Elizabeth W. Kraemer

2 A Historical and Theoretical Review of the Literature: Reading and Writing Connections
Allison L. Harl

3 How Other Nations Approach Reading and Writing
Jennifer Coon

Part II: Classrooms and Students
4 Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum: Best Practices and Practical Guidelines
Alice Horning

5 First Year Writers: Forward Movement, Backward Progress
Kathleen Skomski

6 Second Language Reading-Writing Relations
William Grabe and Cui Zhang

7 The Common Core Standards and Preparation for Reading and Writing in College
David A. Jolliffe

Part III: Contexts and Resources
8 Reading and Writing Connections in College Composition Textbooks: The Role of Textbook Readers
Jimmy Fleming

9 Reuniting Reading and Writing: Revisiting the Role of the Library
Cynthia R. Haller

10 Undergraduate Research and Information Literacy in the Digital Environment
Erik D. Drake

Appendix A: The Association of College and Research Libraries Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education [Excerpt]
Appendix B: Research-Based Recommendations for Effective Instruction in 21st-Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief produced by the National Council of Teachers of English [Excerpt]
Appendix C: Conference on College Composition and Communication Position Statement on Teaching, Learning, and Assessing Writing in Digital Environments [Excerpt]
Appendix D: Writing Program Administrators’ First Year Writing Outcomes [Excerpt]
Appendix E: Common Core Standards in English Language Arts [Excerpts]
Appendix F: Other Writing Textbooks of Note
Glossary
References
Contributors
About the Editors

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Rewriting Success in Rhetoric and Composition Careers

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-292-6

Edited by Amy Goodburn, Donna LeCourt, and Carrie Leverenz

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Catherine Hobbs, Patricia Sullivan, Thomas Rickert and Jennifer Bay

Cover of Rewriting SuccessInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-292-6 (paperback, $30; £20; $30 CAD; €24; $30 AUD); 978-1-60235-293-3 (hardcover, $60; £40; $60 CAD; €48; $60 AUD); 978-1-60235-294-0 (Adobe ebook, $20; £14; $20 CAD; €16; $20 AUD). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 240 pages, with bibliography, notes, and index.

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Description

Rewriting Success in Rhetoric and Composition Careers presents alternative narratives of what constitutes success in the field of rhetoric and composition from those who occupy traditionally undervalued positions in the academy (tribal college, community colleges, postdoctoral tracks), those who have used their PhDs outside of the academy (a law firm, a textbook publisher, a community center), and those who have engaged in professionalization opportunities not typical in the field (research center, a nonprofit humanities organization). By making alternative career choices and paths more visible, editors Amy Goodburn, Donna LeCourt, and Carrie Leverenz hope to encourage new and established teachers and scholars in the field to reconsider the value of knowledge in rhetoric and composition and to enable more people already in the profession to find their own (alternative) paths to success. Rewriting Success in Rhetoric and Composition Careers will appeal to both graduate students and professionals who want to think critically about what kinds of careers are possible with advanced training in rhetoric and composition, those who are reconsidering the current status and future of the discipline, and those in administrative or leadership positions who seek to better support alternative career paths.

About the Author

Amy Goodburn is Professor of English and Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Donna LeCourt is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Writing Center at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Carrie Leverenz is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Institute for Critical and Creative Expression at Texas Christian University.

Contents

Introduction by Amy Goodburn, Donna LeCourt, and Carrie Leverenz

Section 1: Redefining Work in Academic Institutions
1 Field Notes from a Composition Adjunct at the Biomedical Engineering Outpost by Mya Poe
2 Moving Up in the World: Making a Career at a Two-year College by Malkiel Choseed
3 Nontraditional Professionals: A Successful Career with a PhD in Rhetoric and Composition? by Ildikó Melis
4 Opportunity and Respect: Keys to Contingent Faculty Success by Sue Doe
5 Disclaimer: "Professional Academic on a Closed Course: Do Not Attempt this at Home" by Heather Graves

Section 2: Redefining Valuable Knowledge Beyond Academe
6 Coming to Terms: Authority in Action and Advocacy by Moira K. Amado-McCoy
7 Ten Ways English Studies Contributes to User Experience Research, or: How to Retrofit an English Studies Degree by Dave Yeats
8 Establishing a Writing Curriculum at a Law Firm by Benjamin Opipari
9 My Unexpected Success as a Technical Editor by Shannon Wisdom
10 Conversing with the Same Field: Same Questions, Different Road by Nick Carbone

Section 3: Working for Change
11 Mentoring for Change by Cindy Moore
12 Composing a Life: Negotiating Personal, Professional, and Activist Commitments within the Academy by Jennifer Ahern-Dodson
13 Researching to Professionalize, not Professionalizing to Research: Modular Professionalization and the WIDE Effect by Stacey Pigg, Kendall Leon, and Martine Courant Rife
14 Bridging Town and Gown through Academic Internships by Lara Smith-Sitton and Lynée Lewis Gaillet

Index
Contributors

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Rhetoric Across Borders

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-737-2

Edited by Anne Teresa Demo

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-737-2 (paperback, $32.00); 978-1-60235-738-9 (hardcover, $65.00); 978-1-60235-739-6 (Adobe eBook on CD, $20) © 2015 by the Rhetoric Society of America. Published by Parlor Press. 312 pages, with notes, illustrations, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Rhetoric Across Borders features twenty-one essays and six excerpts from the "In Conversation" panels convened at the sixteenth Biennial Rhetoric Society of America (RSA) Conference. Participants engaged the conference theme of "Border Rhetorics" in ways that not only reinvigorated the border as a conceptual metaphor but also challenged boundaries within rhetorical scholarship. Although the volume includes only a select representation of the work presented at the conference, each section features the diverse perspectives offered in Composition and Communication. The first section, Between Materiality and Rhetoric, explores points of interface between rhetoric and materiality. Working from diverse periods and disciplinary orientations, the authors illuminate how attending to the mutuality between materiality and rhetoric engenders a productive revision and/or expansion of our approaches to essential aspects of rhetorical inquiry. The second section, Crossing Cultures: Refiguring Audience, Author, Text, and Borders, explores how various forms of translation, migration, and liminality can refigure our understanding of the interplay between audience, author, and text. Essays in the third section, Remapping the Political, examine the diverse genres that broaden our understanding of the res publica and the tactics employed to circumscribe politics. In the fourth section, Contesting Boundaries: Science, Technology, and Nature, authors consider how shifting notions of expertise and competing epistemologies alter our conceptions of science and the environment. The selected essays in the final section, Teaching Across Divides, explore the different boundaries that shape teaching in rhetoric and composition. Here, the authors reflect on the challenges and rewards gained by explicitly engaging the borders and boundarywork that often remains invisible to our students. These organizational groupings reflect thematic through-lines in the submissions as well as a confidence in Burke's perspective by incongruity as a method fitting the exploration of various borderlands. The volume concludes with fragments from select "In Conversation" panels that cover a range of issues from activism and intersectionality to publishing and rhetorical theory.

About the Editor

Anne Teresa Demo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences at Pennsylvania State University. A past recipient of the National Communication Association's Golden Monograph award, her articles have appeared in the Quarterly Journal of Speech, Critical Studies in Media Communication, Rhetoric and Public Affairs, and Women's Studies in Communication. She is the coeditor of Rhetoric, Remembrance, and Visual Form: Sighting Memory (Routledge, 2012) and The Motherhood Business: Communication, Consumption, and Privilege (University of Alabama Press, forthcoming).

Contents

Introduction
Anne Teresa Demo

Between Materiality and Rhetoric
1 Material Rhetoric and the Ritual Transfiguration of Impure Flesh in the Purification Rules (Dead Sea Scrolls 4QTohorot A and 4QTohorot B)
Bruce McComiskey

2 Rhetorical and Material Boundaries: Animal Agency and Presence in Small Oceanic Islands
Peter Goggin

3 Smellscapes, Social Justice, and Olfactory Perception
Lisa L. Phillips

4 Blurring the Boundaries: Projective Embodiment in Videogames
Jeffrey B. Holmes

Crossing Cultures: Refiguring Audience, Author, Text and Borders

5 Toward a New Understanding of Audience in the Medieval Arabic Translation Movement: The Case of Al-Kindi's "Statement on the Soul"
Maha Baddar

6 All Nations, One Blood, Three Hundred Years: Martin Luther King, Jr., Fannie Lou Hamer, and Civil Rights Rhetoric as Transatlantic Abolitionism  
Keith D. Miller

7 "Carry Your Green Book With You": The Green Book as Representative Anecdote  
Elizabethada A. Wright

8 Gertrude Stein on the Borders of Identity  
Patrick Shaw

9 (Re)Bordering the Scholarly Imaginary: The State and Future of Rhetorical Border Studies  
Antonio Tomas De La Garza, D. Robert DeChaine, & Kent A. Ono

Remapping the Political

10 Peacemaking and the Chancery in Medieval Cairo: Revisiting Medieval Arabic Rhetoric
Rasha Diab

11 "What It Is to Be a Queenslander": The Australian State Parliamentary Motion of Condolence on Natural Disasters as Epideictic and Regional Rhetoric  
Rosemary Williamson

12 Going Digital: Rhetorical Strategies in the Enhanced State of the Union
Jeffrey A. Kurr

13 Redrawing the GOP Borders? Women, Reproduction, and the Political Landscape of the 2014 Midterm Election
Lora Arduser & Amy Koerber

Contesting Boundaries: Science, Technology, and Nature

14 Localized Science Sentinels: TEDx and the Shared Norms of Scientific Integrity
Ron Von Burg

15 Citizen Science in Lower Hood Canal: The Emergence of the Lower Hood Canal Watershed Coalition (LHCWC) as a Forum for Environmental Education, Policy Development and the Shaping of Political Will  
John Angus Campbell

16 The "Native" as Not So Creative Commonplace in the Borderland of Environmental Writing
Alexis F. Piper

17 Technologies of Mediation and the Borders and Boundaries of Human-Nonhuman Animal Relationships in Marine Species Advocacy
Amy D. Propen

Teaching Across Divides

18 "What did you do in the war, Mommy?" Competing Constructs in the Women in Military Service for America Memorial
Amy Milakovic

19 Service-Learning in the "Borderlands" at an Hispanic Serving Institution in South Texas
Susan Garza

20 Assessing the New Media Rhetoric: Crossing Disciplinary Boundaries
Kathleen Marie Baldwin

21 Positioning Rhetoric at The Heart of the Matter: Engaging Faculty, Engaging Students
Jane Detweiler, Margaret R. LaWare, Thomas P. Miller, & Patti Wojahn

In Conversation: Fragments and Provocations

22 Fragments from "In Conversation: Critical Rhetorics of Race"
Keith Gilyard & Kent A. Ono

23 Fragments from "In Conversation: Rhetoric and Activism"
Dana Cloud & Seth Kahn

24 Fragments from "Coalitional Gestures, Third Spaces, and Rhetorical Imaginaries: A Dialogue in Queer Chican@ Feminism"
Karma R. Chávez & Adela C. Licona

25 In Conversation: The Rhetoric of Disability and Access
James L. Cherney & Margaret Price

26 Fragment from "What Role Can/Should Academic Journals Play in the Future of Rhetoric Scholarship"
Barbara Biesecker, James Jasinski, & Kelly Ritter

27 Fragments from "Rhetorical Theory: Questions, Provocations, Futures"
Bradford Vivian & Diane Davis

Contributors
Index

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Rhetoric's Earthly Realm: Heidegger, Sophistry, and the Gorgian Kairos

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-147-9

Bernard Alan Miller

Winner of the Gary Olson JAC Award for Best Book in Rhetorical Theory and Cultural Studies (2012)

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Catherine Hobbs, Patricia Sullivan, Thomas Rickert and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-147-9 (paperback, $34.00, £22, $34 CAD, €25, $33 AUS). ©2011 by Parlor Press. 197 pages, with notes and bibliography.

Other Formats Available: 978-1-60235-148-6 (hardcover, $65.00, £40, $63 CAD, €45, $61 AUS) 978-1-60235-149-3 (Adobe eBook, $20.00, £13, $20 CAD, €15, $20 AUS).

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Description

Plato privileges the realm of absolute reality and truth above and beyond the world of language, discourse, and rhetoric.  For Plato, earth harbors the façade of mere appearances and the evils of the bewitching powers of language. 

In Rhetoric’s Earthly Realm: Heidegger, Sophistry, and the Gorgian Kairos, Bernard Alan Miller counters this intellectual legacy with an innovative and thoroughly conceived theory of rhetoric, one concerned with “earth” in its Heideggerian aspect, complex and multifaceted, at the root of a phenomenology placing the focus on earth as the power of Being itself, whereby it is manifest purely as language. Here, earth means “native soil,” a place of the “rootedness” of a people, where the forces of nature and culture are joined in language to constitute a community. In Miller’s view, language is not only an ontological process comprising the very dynamic of our being  but, more critical to Rhetoric’s Earthly Realm, it is a power whose rhetorical dimensions are most clearly apparent in the phenomenon of kairos.

The concept of kairos—as espoused by the Sophist Gorgias—has an enigmatic dimension, being an instance of the “pre-Socratic mystery” and therefore bearing a much more mystical imprint than otherwise sanctioned in theories of rhetoric. It  designates a “spontaneity” in the generation of language that, from the Platonic perspective, has discomforting similarities to processes of psychic intervention and poetic frenzy. Given the perspective of an “earthly realm,” Miller attempts to retrieve a kairos true to the spirit of Gorgias, one where the pre-Socratic world view remains intact, allowing a more congenial ambiance for reimagining and appreciating Sophistic rhetoric. In Rhetoric’s Earthly Realm, the essential ingredients of Sophistic rhetoric are reconfigured or rendered anew, including concepts like doxa, apate, and techne

About the Author

Bernard Alan Miller teaches courses in writing, American Indian literature, and freshman composition at Eastern Michigan University. His research and publications have dealt primarily with rhetorical theory, with an emphasis on cross-cultural studies and the various connections between pre-Platonic and postmodern thought. He earned his PhD in 1987 from Purdue University.

Contents

Acknowledgments
1 Introduction: Earthly Realms and the Pre-Socratic Mystery
2 The Platonic Kairos
3 The Gorgian Kairos
4 Das Sein, Dasein, and Doxa: Attending to the Way of Heidegger's Thought
5 Heidegger and the Gorgian Kairos
6 Paradox and the Power of the Possible: Kairos as the Mark of the Trickster
Notes
Works Cited
Index
About the Author

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Rotten with Perfection T-Shirt

$15.00
SKU: KBS2011

Kenneth Burke Conference T-Shirts

Get your limited run t-shirts from the 2011 Triennial Conference of the Kenneth Burke Society hosted at Clemson University, May 26-29, 2011. T-shirts are 100% cotton and come in a range of sizes. Each t-shirt front has one of five lines from Burke's "Definition of Human."

The back shows the conference logo (an outline of Burke's image) and other conference details. Supplies are limited. Please make your selections below.

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Scientific Writing in a Second Language

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-379-4

David Ian Hanauer and Karen Englander

Second Language Writing
Series Editor: Paul Kei Matsuda

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-379-4 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-380-0 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-381-7 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 275 pages, with illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Scientific Writing in a Second Language investigates and aims to alleviate the barriers to the publication of scientific research articles experienced by scientists who use English as a second language. David Ian Hanauer and Karen Englander provide a comprehensive meta-synthesis of what is currently known about the phenomenon of second language scientific publication and the ways in which this issue has been addressed. Scientific Writing in a Second Language reports new qualitative and quantitative research on the phenomenon and problems faced by second language scientists publishing in English. This data explicitly quantifies the burden of second language science writing. Hanauer and Englander also provide a framework of educational resources that facilitate informed, innovative approaches to alleviate the barrier of English literacy from publishing scientific knowledge by second language English writers.

Scientific Writing in a Second Language provides a sophisticated analysis of the issues faced by publishing second language scientists and a synthesis of pedagogical options for enhancing the options scientists have to write and publish research articles in a second language. Scientific Writing in a Second Language is a central resource for professional scientists whose first language is not English and for those applied linguists, second language writing specialists, and compositionists who work with them.

About the Authors

David Ian Hanauer is Professor of English/Applied Linguistics at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and an educational researcher and the Assessment Coordinator of the Phage Hunters Integrating Research and Education Program situated in the Hatful Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the author of six books, including Scientific Discourse: Multiliteracy in the Classroom, Poetry as Research and Active Assessment: Assessing Scientific Inquiry (with Graham Hatfull and Deborah Jacobs-Sera). His articles have been published in Science and a wide range of applied linguistics and educational journals.

Karen Englander, York University, Canada, is a long-time faculty member of the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexico, where she works with scientists and graduate students who seek to publish their research in English. She has published empirical research on the policy, linguistic, and identity issues implicated in writing and publishing scholarly work in English when the writer is not a native speaker of the language. She is co-editor of Discourses and Identities in Contexts of Educational Change, and her work has appeared in the Journal of Applied Linguistics, Discourse Studies, Journal of Language, Identity and Education, Journal of International Women’s Studies, and Written Communication among others.

Contents

Acknowledgments
1 The Dominance of the English Research Article in the Scientific World
2 The Genre of the Scientific Research Article
3 Second Language Writing and the Research Article
4 Methodology: Researching Spanish Speaking Scientists in Mexico
5 The Quantification and Specification of the Difficulties of Writing a Research Article for Publication in a Second Language: Survey Report
6 Developing Scientific Writing Expertise: Qualitative Individual Data
7 Developing Scientific Writing Expertise: Qualitative Group Data
8 Facilitating Improved Scientific Writing in English as a Second Language 
9 Practical and Policy Implications of Supporting Second Language Scientific Writing
Notes
References
Index
About the Authors

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Spine

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-754-9

Carolyn Guinzio

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-754-9 (paperback, $14) 978-1-60235-755-6 (PDF, $12) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 79 pages.

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Reviews

Praise for Carolyn Guinzio's Spine

“My fellow-/assemblages of cells and I thread/ our minds through the loops/of our bodies” is as succinct a statement of the human (not to mention non-human as well) condition as I have ever read. The loops and hoops of bodies, of the physical constraining the spiritual, is the essential conflict providing the dazzling energy of this brilliant book. These are love poems from and to every conceivable form of life, which is a kind of definition of poetry itself, after all.—BIN RAMKE

When I read the poems of Carolyn Guinzio, I feel like I’m learning what it’s like to be part of a natural setting – one species among others – and yet, at the same time, aware of the technology of my own mind processing it all. It’s like being in the world, of the world, and something else too, something indefinable. As she puts it: “Behind this world, that other --/ Where a spine divides the hemispheres./ (We return to the surface,/ unable to say what we’ve seen.)” Except in these poems, which teach us how to look.—ELAINE EQUI

In her spellbinding Spine, Carolyn Guinzio seems to consider recontextualizing all of nature and all of “the text” within the tricks, the forms, and the electricity of the worldwide web. But the wires can fall in the storm. I kept waiting for a solar flare to ruin all the satellites and put things right, but this book is more brilliantly ambivalent than that. And it is that relentless ambivalence, that relentless noticing, that become among the extreme plsrs of this txt. —SARAH VAP

About the Author

Carolyn Guinzio's previous collections are West Pullman (Bordighera, 2005), winner of the Bordighera Poetry Prize, Quarry (Parlor, 2008), and Spoke & Dark (Red Hen, 2012), winner of the To The Lighthouse/A Room Of Her Own Prize. Find her online at carolynguinzio.tumblr.com

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Split the Crow

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-635-1

Sarah Sousa

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-635-1 (paperback; $14) 978-1-60235-636-8 (PDF, $12) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 84 pages.

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Reviews

Praise for Split the Crow

"Something magical happens in these pages—we are waked from forgetfulness and are pulled into a living history that revives us and spares us nothing. The reader demands: 'we want /what is real, don't deny us' and Sousa does not disappoint. In exploring the narrative of Mary Rowlandson, Split the Crow employs lyric to stop time, draw it close, and inspect it on its own terms without being either pedantic or patronizing. Sousa bares essential truths of our young country; we have struggled all along defining ourselves by othering. In spite of this, Split the Crow shows all that is human is transitive. I had been dying to read this book until I read it; I did not know what I lacked until I was sated."

 —TJ Jarrett

"Split the Crow is rife with surprise, rich with inventive images from the natural world, and delicious with music. Weaving through centuries of Native American material culture, Sousa walks no straight lines. From 'Her Moods Caused Owls': 'Once there was a girl who spoke / garlands' and (four lines later) 'her fear caused gardens.' This brilliant, idiosyncratic book rides the wave of language and consciousness rather than narrative, to breathtaking effect. And this poet is not just smart, she's wise."

—Ellen Dore Watson

"The poems of Sarah Sousa's Split the Crow employ archaeology as a means of giving voice not only to the land, but to long-gone peoples. We discover the objects that individuals were equipped with for their final journeys, as well as witnessing their tales. Sousa's work picks up where conventional history has left off, giving voice to urgent testimonies. 'The Lost People,' states, 'On the train coming east, / not knowing what else to do, boys sang / the death songs our warriors sang riding into battle,' just one of many instances where Native American accounts find a ready home in Sousa's poetry. Split the Crow is a collection of tremendous magnitude that calls upon the past as a way to reconsider our present moment."

—Mary Biddinger

About the Author

Sarah Sousa’s poems have appeared in The Massachusetts Review, Fugue, Passages North, Barn Owl Review, and Salt Hill Journal, among others. Her first collection, Church of Needles, won the Red Mountain Prize (Red Mountain Press, 2014). She is the editor and transcriber of The Diary of Esther Small; 1886, holds an MFA from Bennington College, and lives in Western Massachusetts with her husband and two sons.

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Spool

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-744-0

Matthew Cooperman

Winner of the New Measure Poetry Prize
Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-744-0 (paperback, $14) 978-1-60235-745-7 (PDF, $12) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 120 pages.

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Reviews

Praise for Matthew Cooperman's Spool

"Spool's a year 'written in threes'—its three word lines forming narrow columns or perhaps threads. 'Thread' is a word Cooperman explicitly associates with the lyric here and it is also Ariadne's thread of rescue or at least return though, at times, 'the tape is/broken now so / sick and slck.' To change up the metaphor, as this poem does, Spool is a hive of words continuously active and also continuously threatened with a sort of colony collapse. Written in conversation with past greats such as Shakespeare, Milton, Hopkins, Spool is a way of inhabiting our present."—RAE ARMANTROUT

"Carefully wrought, these taut, concentrated poems move together on a fundamental level between limit and enlargement, impatience and watching, intention and play. Three words to the turn 'of increments serializing' pull out and wind back a  'current between you / and me     rivers.' Cooperman's Spool is remarkable."—PAM REHM

"Cooperman spools his investigations of wild domesticity on 'parcels of sound,' 'peace bullets,' 'creaks on cricket / strings,' tumbrels tilted to shake free 'the bird O' of his daughter's throat. An animal in the material sunders as it lands thought in language, birds in words. 'Have you seen / your hands  in/ dreams?' The poems are concerned with things rare and daily, with 'beginning to see / and continuing to / see.' With how to mend and live more generously in care of things near, sewing what we rend. Spool learns its part in the evolutionary drama of species, rent beyond repair yet ongoing, even exuberant. The poem winds together opposites, as it tweets 'the vireo's here' and after. Intimate work from a master of the panorama, the landscapes here are inside words."—JONATHAN SKINNER

About the Author

Matthew Cooperman is the author of, most recently, the text + image collaboration Imago for the Fallen World, with Marius Lehene (2013), as well as Still: of the Earth as the Ark which Does Not Move (2011), DaZE (2006), and A Sacrificial Zinc (2001), winner of the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize. More information can be found at http://matthewcooperman.org/.

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Strategies for Writing Center Research

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-719-8

Jackie Grutsch McKinney

Lenses on Composition Studies
Series Editors: Sheryl I. Fontaine and Steve Westbrook

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-719-8 (paperback, $30.00); 978-1-60235-720-4 (hardcover, $60.00); 978-1-60235-721-1 (Adobe eBook, $20). © 2016 by Parlor Press. 218 pages.

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Description

Strategies for Writing Center Research is a guide to empirical research on writing center work. Though there are many other places where formal writing instruction, conversations about writing, conversations about teaching writing, writing, and revision happen, these activities are all always occurring in writing centers. All of the political, theoretical, social, spatial, technological, and practical debates about how a someone becomes a better writer play out hour after hour in the writing center; thus, the possibility of the writing center as a site for serious, interesting, groundbreaking writing research cannot be overstated.

Strategies for Writing Center Research is divided into three parts that correspond, more or less, to the stages of a research project. Part 1 includes an overview of writing center research, an introduction to key terms for research, a discussion of how to conduct bibliographic research in writing center studies, and advice on shaping a research proposal. Part 2 helps readers select appropriate research methods for their research questions. Chapters are devoted to discourse analysis, interviewing, surveying, fieldwork, and action research, including a discussion of the limitations, ethical challenges, and pitfalls to expect, as well as a description of the sort of data collected. Part 3 includes a discussion of approaches for analyzing and reporting research.

About the Author

Jackie Grutsch McKinney is Director of the Writing Center and Associate Professor of English at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. Her scholarship on writing center issues has appeared in key journals such as WPA: Writing Program Administration, Writing Center Journal, Writing Lab Newsletter, and Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, as well as in several writing center edited collections including Before and After the Tutorial, Multiliteracy Centers, and The St. Martin’s Sourcebook for Writing Tutors. Her first book, Peripheral Visions for Writing Centers, won the International Writing Center Association Outstanding Book Award in 2014.

Contents

Download a detailed Table of Contents.

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Why Conduct Writing Center Research?

Part I
1 Getting Situated
2 Getting Started

Part II
3 Studying Texts and Talk
4 Studying Individuals
5 Studying Populations
6 Studying Sites and Tools
7 Studying Possibilities: Action Research

Part III
8 Analyzing and Interpreting Your Data
9 Sharing Your Research

Glossary
Notes
Works Cited
Appendix A: Sample Informed Consent Form
Appendix B: Sample Release Form
Appendix C: Driscoll and Perdue's RAD Rubric
Appendix D: Transcriptions
About the Author
Index

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Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-612-2

Brian Ray

Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition
Series Editors: Charles Bazerman, Mary Jo Reiff, and Anis Bawarshi

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-612-2 (paperback, $32) 978-1-60235-613-9 (hardcover, $65) 978-1-60235-614-6 (PDF, on CD, $20). © 2015 by Parlor Press. 278 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Description

Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy conducts an in-depth investigation into the long and complex evolution of style in the study of rhetoric and writing. The theories, research methods, and pedagogies covered here offer a conception of style as more than decoration or correctness—views that are still prevalent in many college settings as well as in public discourse.

The book begins by tracing origins of style in sophistic-era Greece, moving from there to alternative and non-Western rhetorical traditions, showing style as always inventive and even at times subversive. Although devalued in subsequent periods, including the twentieth century, contemporary views now urge for renewed attention to the scholarly and pedagogical possibilities of style as experimentation and risk, rather than as safety and conformity. These contemporary views include work in areas of rhetoric and composition, such as basic writing, language difference, digital and multimodal discourse, feminist rhetorics, and rhetorical grammar. Later chapters in this book also explore a variety of disciplines and research methods—sociolinguistics and dialectology, literary and rhetorical stylistics, discourse and conversation analysis, and World Englishes. Finally, teachers and students will appreciate a final chapter that explains practical teaching methods, provides ideas for assignments and activities, and surveys textbooks that promote a rhetorical stance toward style.

About the Author

Brian Ray is Assistant Professor of English and Director of Composition at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. His work on style and language issues has appeared in Rhetoric Review, Composition Studies, Computers and Composition, and the Journal of Basic Writing.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Series Editors' Preface by Anis Bawarshi, Charles Bazerman, and Mary Jo Reiff

1 What Is Style, and Why Does It Matter?

Definitions of Style
Style as Form and Meaning
Style as Eloquence
Style as Grammar
Style as Voice
Style as Possibility and Risk
Conclusion: A Cacophony of Definitions

2 Historical Review I: From Ancient Greece through Rome

Style Before the Sophists
Sophists (Fifth and Fourth Centuries BCE)
Plato (Fourth Century BCE)
Isocrates (Fifth and Fourth Centuries BCE)
Aristotle (Fourth Century BCE)
Roman Style: Cicero and Quintilian
Greco-Roman Rhetorical Curriculum: Imitation and the Progymnasmata
Later Greeks: Demetrius, Hermogenes, and Longinus (First — Fourth Century, CE)
Feminist and Non-Western Styles in the Classical and Ancient World
Augustine of Hippo (Fourth and Fifth Centuries CE)

3 Historical Review II: From the Middle Ages through Nineteenth Century US

Boethius (Fifth and Sixth Centuries CE)
Christine de Pizan
Renaissance Style
Renaissance Curriculum
Erasmus
The Ramist Watershed
Style in the Enlightenment and the Standardization of English
Gutting the Classical Canon: Harvard and the New Curriculum, 1875–1940

4 Contemporary Views on Style

Style in Publics and Counterpublics
Style, Voice, and Discourse
Bakhtin, Dialogism, and Style
Bakhtin, Classical Rhetoric, and Postmodern Imitation

5 The Relationship Between Style, Voice, and Grammar

Linguistics and Style in Rhetoric and Composition
Christensen's Rhetoric
Winston Weathers and Alternate Style
Sentence-Combining Pedagogies
Rhetorical Grammar

6 Frontiers of Style in Rhetoric and Composition

Language Difference, Linguistic Diversity, and Style
Style, Voice, and Feedback in Second Language Writing
Women's Writing and Breaking Rules 13
Style, Academic Genres, and Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)
Style, Digital Genres, and Multimodality
Conclusion

7 Researching Style: Methods in Rhetoric, Composition, and Related Disciplines

Rhetoric and Composition
Stylistics
Discourse Analysis
Rhetorical Analysis
From Style to Styles: An Overview of Sociolinguistics
Dialectology
Corpus Linguistics and Stylistics
Research(es) on World Englishes and Global English

8 Teaching Strategies and Best Practices

T. R. Johnson and The Rhetoric of Pleasure
Textbooks: Linguistic and Sociolinguistic Approaches
Approaches Informed by Classical Rhetoric
Mixed Approaches
Final Thoughts on Teaching Style

Glossary
Annotated Bibliography: Further Readings on Style
Works Cited
About the Author
Index

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Suasive Iterations: Rhetoric, Writing, and Physical Computing

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-568-2

David M. Rieder

New Media Theory
Series Editor, Byron Hawk

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-568-2 (paperback, $34); 978-1-60235-569-9 (hardcover, $65); 978-1-60235-570-5 (PDF on CD, $20) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 188 pages in full color throughout including 61 color illustrations, bibliography, and index.

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What People Are Saying

"Suasive Iterations pushes the definitions of writing in ways both theoretically and practically sophisticated. The connection to physical computing pushes this approach in a new and innovative direction, providing a platform for the field to think about the relationship between/among the physical, the virtual, and the rhetorical in writing studies. This work is poised to propel the field in ways that some will find quite uncomfortable, but it makes a very strong case for its argument. Suasive Iterations will likely be a key reading in digital rhetoric and computers and composition courses as well as for the broader range of audiences in the digital humanities and digital media arts." —Douglas Eyman, George Mason University

Description

In Suasive Iterations, Rieder argues that in order to engage persuasively with audiences today, digital rhetors and (distant) writers must break through the screen-based looking glass of the PC era that persists in our fields. The PC era normed us to the idea that the virtual realm of the computer is separate and distinct from our "real," everyday world.  Yet the new, post-PC era of physical computing is now replacing the screen, keyboard, and mouse, producing engagements in which the virtual and the real are combined, leading to an ever-growing range of experiences between the self and the world. Rieder argues that to persuade or move an audience today, rhetors and writers must invent experiences that "evert" the virtual and the real in novel ways. This creative process begins with "transductive" and stylistic uses of the sensors, actuators, and microprocesses that are the building blocks of this new era of popular computing.

About the Author

David M Rieder is Associate Professor of English, faculty member of the Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media PhD program, and Co-Director of Circuit Research Studio at North Carolina State University. His research interests are at the intersections of digital media theory, digital rhetoric/writing, and digital humanities. Recent scholarly and creative works include the co-edited collection, Small Tech, essays and 'born digital' works in Kairos, Computers and Composition Online, Hyperrhiz, Present Tense, Itineration, and Enculturation. Rieder is a programmer and maker whose work includes digital media collaborations for public audiences. Recent examples of public collaborations include three works in Raleigh's Contemporary Art Museum (CAM).

Contents

1. Introduction: For/Get the Digital (and Ditch the Umbrella)
2. Transduction and Allegorized Style
            2.5. Writing with Three-Dimensional Wa(y)ves         
3. Onto-Allegories for the "Great Outdoors"
            3.5. Onto-Allegorized Tweets and the Third (Wayve) State
4. Plumbing the Paradoxical Depths
            4.5. The Paradoxical Depths of Delivery
5. A Call for Distant (Transductive) Writing
            5.5. Choric Capacitances
6. Conclusion: After the Bookish Era of the PC
Works Cited
Index

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Summoned: Poem 1977–1982

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-524-8

Summoned: Poem 1977–1982

Guillevic

Translated by Monique Chefdor and Stella Harvey
Introductions by Stella Harvey and Monique Chefdor
Afterword by Lucie Albertini Guillevic

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-524-8 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-525-5 (PDF on CD. $16) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 422 pages, in French and English.

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Description

The sixteenth of the twenty-five major works of Guillevic published by Gallimard since 1942, Summoned (Requis) represents a pivotal moment, reaffirming the poet's position as an essential voice in contemporary French po­etry. Noted for its ceaseless probing of the ungraspable enigma experienced in every immediate encounter with the material world, be it with stone, sea, a leaf, a blade of grass, the poet's vision now opens onto the ultimate reaches of the universe. The poet is summoned to bear witness to the human mortal condition and at the same time heed the compulsion of "our touch/ Upon the limitless."

Praise for Guillevic's Summoned

To translate the movements of one existent into another is poetry's privilege. It is also what life does. The living exchanges that take place between existents as dissimilar as a leaf and a cloud, or a pebble's surface and a human hand, are what Guillevic's poem celebrates and exemplifies. This sensitive translation by Monique Chefdor and Stella Harvey gives English-speaking readers the chance to listen to a Breton poet's unique engagement with spheres of living that extend even to the interstellar. —STEVEN WINSPUR

A poem and its translation have been compared to a brocade and its underside: the threads are all there, but the magic is lost. This certainly does not apply to the translation of Guillevic's Requis by Monique Chefdor and Stella Harvey. Summoned is its own rich brocade, all the more striking given the daunting task of capturing the elegant simplicity of the form and the ineffable reaches of the content. For, embedded in the multi-layered poetry are both the yearnings of mystics to experience ultimate reality and the endeavors of physicists to explore the unknown realms beyond three-dimensional human existence. —KATHERINE KREUTER

About the Author

Eugène Guillevic (1907–1997) was one of France's leading poets in the second half of the twentieth century. Guillevic, as he preferred to be known, published more than thirty-five collections of poetry in his lifetime.

About the Translators and Contributors

Monique Chefdor, formerly professor of French and Comparative Literature at Scripps College, Claremont University Center, California, and Maître de Conférences in Comparative Literature at the University of Picardie Jules Verne, France, has published extensively on 20th century French literature, notably on Cendrars, Proust, Segalen, Guillevic, and the relationship between painters and writers. She has translated works of Cendrars into English: Complete Postcards from America, (University of California Press, 1976, introduced Modernities and Other Writings, translated in collaboration with Esther Allen, (University of Nebraska Press, 1992), introduced Guillevic: The Sea and Other Poems, translated by Patricia Terry (Boston: Black Widow Press, Commonwealth Books, 2007). The author of "Le cantique du quantique" in Guillevic maintenant, (Paris: Honoré  Champion, 2011) and Guillevic et les peintres, (Paris: Editions Calliopée, 2007), the catalogue of the exhibition she curated for the National Celebration of the centennial of the poet's birth, she was one of three speakers for a DVD, "Guillevic and Painters" (University of Rennes II: crea/cim, June 2007), and participated in several radio interviews on Guillevic, including a one-hour national broadcast on France Culture.

Stella Harvey is the author of a monograph Myth and the Sacred in the Poetry of Guillevic (Amsterdam-Atlanta: Rodopi, 1997), and has published a number of articles on Guillevic, the most recent of which appear in Guillevic maintenant and Notes Guillevic Notes (Vol I, Fall/Autumn, 2011). She has also published in the field of applied linguistics. She is a senior lecturer in the Centre for English Language and Academic Writing at Goldsmiths University of London.

Lucie Albertini Guillevic, the poet's widow, is a writer and translator. Her collaborations as a translator have introduced to major French publishers (Maurice Nadeau, Gallimard, Actes Sud, Arfuyen) some forty Swedish and Finnish writers, including August Strindberg, Stig Dagerman, Ingmar Bergman, Bo Carpelan, Lars Gustafsson, Edith Södergran,Tua Forsström, Lars Norèn, Paavo Haavikko, and Pentti Holappa. Her paper "Traduire à deux: notes autour d 'une pratique " given at the fifth "Rencontres de Liré" in Anjouis included in the proceedings of the colloquium Le français dans les langues d'Europe (Rennes: Presses Universitaires, 2012). To date, she has edited and introduced seven posthumous volumes of Guillevic's works.

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Sunshine Wound

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-585-9

L.S. Klatt

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-585-9 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-586-6 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 90 pages.

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Reviews

Adam Day, "Faith and Skepticism." The Cincinnati Review 13.1 (Summer 2016).

Praise for Sunshine Wound

"While the poems in this alert collection rarely depend on specific geography, there is a strong sense of somewhere here. These poems catch the mind in the process of thinking and plot the subtle constellations that arise from the intersection between the actual and the imaginary. Shades and tones and moods are evoked, as we might find in the paintings many of these poems reference. And yet, there are quiet echoes of our real world of human endeavor to provide a sense that something's out-of-whack as well as the sense there's something vital to hope for. This is a deeply satisfying book."

—Maurice Manning

"An abstracted yet intensely material apocalyptic hope stalks L. S. Klatt's Sunshine Wound, whose lyrics possess the eerie, chimerical power of skeuomorphs. Vestiges of patriotism, religious ardor, d(e)volution, astronomy, visual art, indexical obsession, classical philosophy, and Westward expansion are conflated with synthetic or surreally altered manifestations of the same, and the result is an eerily prescient articulation of the individual in America—our history, artifice, moxie, anxiety, and faith—in all its dizzying twenty-first-century velocity."

—Lisa Russ Spaar

"This beautiful collection of lyric poems shimmers with dream-like transformations and the kind of inspiring freedom one finds in the notebooks of Sigmar Polke and the journals of  Ralph Waldo Emerson. Klatt invites us into a world that, like our recollections of childhood, is strange and a bit menacing, but suffused with an undefinable aura of possibility. . . . Klatt understands that the poet must build a Rube Goldberg apparatus to set the strange music of delight back in motion. I loved this book."

—Geoffrey Nutter

About the Author

L. S. Klatt's first book, Interloper, was awarded the Juniper Prize for Poetry and was published by the University of Massachusetts Press in 2009. His second collection, Cloud of Ink, won the Iowa Poetry Prize and came out from the University of Iowa Press in 2011. His lyric poem "Andrew Wyeth, Painter, Dies At 91" was anthologized in Best American Poetry 2011 and subsequently made into a ninety-second animated film. He is the current Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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System and Population

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-886-7

Christopher Sindt

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-886-7 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-887-4 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 118 pages.

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Description

System and Population is a lyric account of the proposed damming of the American River in Northern California. It explores the intersections of personal and cultural experience, scientific study, and politics of dams and rivers; meditates on human experiences, such as parenthood and loss; and studies the effects of environmental damage and disaster.

About the Author

Christopher Sindt is a professor of English at Saint Mary’s College of California, where he teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and serves as the vice provost for academic affairs.  He is the author of The Bodies, published in Parlor Press’s Free Verse Editions series (2012), and a chapbook of poetry, The Land of Give and Take.

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Techne, from Neoclassicism to Postmodernism

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-207-0

Understanding Writing as a Useful, Teachable Art

Kelly Pender

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Catherine Hobbs, Patricia Sullivan, Thomas Rickert and Jennifer Bay

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-207-0 (paperback, $27, £18, $27 CAD, €21, $27 AUS). ©2011 by Parlor Press. 197 pages, with notes and bibliography.

Other Formats Available: 978-1-60235-208-7 (hardcover ; $60.00, £39, $60 CAD, €45, $60 AUS); 978-1-60235-209-4 (Adobe eBook; $18, £13, $18 CAD, €15, $18 AUS).

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Description

The word techne has no equivalent in English and so is usually understood as one of the three terms that approximate its original Greek meaning: art, skill, craft.  As a kind of productive knowledge, techne is often defined by its close association with rationality and instrumentality. Techne, from Neoclassicism to Postmodernism: Understanding Writing as a Useful, Teachable Art is a book about the relationships among the many meanings of this complex term. Kelly Pender tells the story of techne’s presence in the development of rhetoric and composition as an academic discipline in the mid-twentieth century, the influence of postmodern theory on that development, and what is often taught or not taught under the rubric of “writing” in contemporary composition courses.  The arguments Techne, from Neoclassicism to Postmodernism makes about these relationships are deconstructive and seek to challenge some of the field’s most firmly entrenched binaries about what writing is and how (or if) it should be taught.  To make these arguments, Techne, from Neoclassicism to Postmodernism uses Samuel Weber’s retranslation of the Heideggerian term “Ge-stell” as a form of emplacement to show how composition theories and pedagogies based on techne work simultaneously to both “close down” and “open up” possibilities for experiencing writing as an inherently valuable, nonrational mode of bringing-forth.

What People Are Saying

Pender’s final provocative suggestion—that it is precisely through the apparent opposition between “closed” and “open” that writing itself has been marginalized within the writing classroom—is an extraordinarily insightful point, one that deserves serious consideration within the rhetoric and composition community.

—John Muckelbauer, author of Invention and the Future: Rhetoric, Postmodernism, and the Problem of Change

About the Author

Kelly Pender holds a PhD in English from Purdue University. She is an assistant professor of English at Virginia Tech, where she teaches courses in professional writing, public discourse, critical theory, and classical rhetoric.  She has presented papers at numerous conferences, and her work has appeared in journals such as Postmodern Culture, Composition Studies, and Rhetoric Society Quarterly.  Her research interests include the history and theory of rhetoric and composition, critical theory, and, medical rhetoric, particularly rhetorics of genetic risk and disease prevention.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 What Is Techne?
2 The New Classicist Definition of Art
3 Postmodern Theory and the Re-Tooling of Techne
4 Closing Down and Opening Up: Techne and the Issue of Instrumentality
5 Closing Down and Opening Up: Techne and the Issue of Teachability
6 Why Techne? Why Now?
Notes
Works Cited
Index
About the Author

Price: $27.00

Telling Stories, Talking Craft: Conversations with Contemporary Writers

$18.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-178-3

Edited by Christopher Feliciano Arnold and Anthony Cook
Foreword by Michael Martone

Published by Parlor Press and Sycamore Review

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-178-3 (paperback, $18.00; £14, $20 CAD, €16, $23 AUS). © 2010 by the Purdue Research Foundation. 243 pages, with indexes.

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-179-0 (Adobe eBook, $14.00; £11, $16 CAD, €13, $18 AUS)

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Description

Telling Stories, Talking Craftis a collection of fifteen conversations with some of the finest contemporary fiction writers. These distinguished authors discuss their lives and their craft in candid, thought-provoking interviews from the pages of Sycamore Review, Purdue University’s international journal of literature, opinion and the arts.

Charles Baxter on the myth of productivity | Kate Bernheimer on taking women seriously | Larry Brown on happy endings | Robert Olen Butler on war and fear | Michael Chabon on his reputation in Finland | Lan Samantha Chang on fiction since 9/11 | Peter Ho Davies on kitchen sink drafts | Andre Dubus III on bartending | Richard Ford on getting in fistfights | Jane Hamilton on landscape and Home Depot | Nick Hornby on The Da Vinci Code  | Ha Jin on being called a traitor | Nami Mun on fictional gaps | Benjamin Percy on zombies and cemeteries | Steve Yarbrough on rejection and the South | Plus: Michael Martone on the art of the literary interview | full index of craft terms

About the Editors

Christopher Feliciano Arnold has written for Playboy, Ecotone, Northwest Review, and other magazines.  His fiction has received awards from The Atlantic Monthly and The National Society of Arts and Letters, and special mention in the Pushcart Prize anthology.

Anthony Cook grew up in Cincinnati and now lives in Lafayette, Indiana. He has worked for the Las Vegas Sun and the Cincinnati Post, and now teaches writing at Purdue University.

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The Available Means of Persuasion: Mapping a Theory and Pedagogy of Multimodal Public Rhetoric

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-308-4

David M. Sheridan, Jim Ridolfo, and Anthony J. Michel

New Media Theory
Series Editor, Byron Hawk

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-308-4 (paperback; $30; £20; $31 CAD; €24; $30 AUS) 978-1-60235-309-1 (hardcover; $60; £40; $62 CAD; €48; $60 AUS) 978-1-60235-310-7 (Adobe ebook; $20; £14; $21 CAD; €16; $21 AUS). © 2012 by Parlor Press. 255 pages, with notes, illustrations, bibliography, and index.

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Description

From the beginning, rhetoric has been a productive and practical art aimed at preparing citizens to participate in communal life. Possibilities for this participation are continually evolving in light of cultural and technological changes. The Available Means of Persuasion: Mapping a Theory and Pedagogy of Multimodal Public Rhetoric explores the ways that public rhetoric has changed due to emerging technologies that enable us to produce, reproduce, and distribute compositions that integrate visual, aural, and alphabetic elements. David M. Sheridan, Jim Ridolfo, and Anthony J. Michel argue that to exploit such options fully, rhetorical theory and pedagogy need to be reconfigured. Rhetorical concepts such as invention, context, and ethics need to be transformed, which has important implications for the writing classroom, among other sites of rhetorical education.

Sheridan, Ridolfo, and Michel suggest an expanded understanding of the ancient rhetorical concept of kairos (the opportune moment) as a unifying heuristic that can help theorists, teachers, and practitioners understand, teach, and produce multimodal public rhetoric more effectively. In this expanded sense, kairos includes considerations of genre and dissemination through material-cultural contexts. Ultimately, they argue that culture itself is at stake in our understanding of multimodal public rhetoric. Important cultural categories such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and place, are produced and reproduced not just through the dynamics of language but through the full range of multimodal practices.

About the Authors

David M. Sheridan is an assistant professor in Michigan State University’s Residential College in the Arts and Humanities, where he teaches courses on writing, creativity, technology, and media. He also directs the RCAH Language and Media Center. His previous publications include articles in JAC, Enculturation, and Computers and Composition. He co-edited, with James Inman, Multiliteracy Centers: Writing Center Work, New Media, and Multimodal Rhetoric (Hampton, 2010). Under the sponsorship of MSU’s Writing in Digital Environments (WIDE) Research Center, Sheridan is working with others to develop a game called INK—a multiplayer virtual world designed to function as a rich environment for public rhetorical practices.  In 2012 Sheridan was the recipient of MSU’s Teacher-Scholar Award.

Jim Ridolfo is Assistant Professor of Composition and Rhetoric at the University of Cincinnati. He received his PhD in 2009 from the Michigan State University Rhetoric and Writing program, where he worked for six years at the Writing in Digital Environments Research Center. His work has appeared in Ariadne, Journal of Community Informatics, JAC, Enculturation, Journal of Community Literacy Studies, Pedagogy, Kairos, and Rhetoric Review. He is currently a 2012 Fulbright Middle East and North Africa Regional Research Scholar and is working on his second book. He lives with his partner Janice Fernheimer and their two pet bearded dragons, Electra and Salsa. 

Anthony J. Michel is currently Chair of the English Department at Avila University in Kansas City, where he teaches courses in American literature and composition and rhetoric. His research interests are in alternative rhetorics, social activism, new media, and writing theory.  He has written on a variety of subjects, including Julie Dash's film Daughters of the Dust, hip hop culture in the writing classroom, and the role of new media in social movements.  His articles and chapters have appeared in JAC, Enculturation, and in several edited collections.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Part I: Foundational Terms
1 Kairos and the Public Sphere
Part II: Kairotic Inventiveness and Rhetorical Ecologies
2 Multimodal Public Rhetoric and the Problem of Access
3 Kairos and Multimodal Public Rhetoric
4 Composing with Rhetorical Velocity: Looking Beyond the Moment of Delivery
5 Challenges for an Ecological Pedagogy of Public Rhetoric: Rhetorical Agency and the Writing Classroom
Part III: The Challenges and Possibilities of Multimodal Semiosis
6 A Fabricated Confession: Multimodality, Ethics, and Pedagogy
7 Public Rhetoric as the Production of Culture
Part IV: Practice and Pedagogy: A Synthesis
8 Case Study: The D Brand
9 Multimodal Public Rhetoric in the Composition Classroom
Notes
Works Cited
Appendix
Index
About the Authors

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The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2010

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-228-5

Edited by Steve Parks, Linda Adler-Kassner, Brian Bailie, and Collette Caton

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978-1-60235-228-5 (paperback, $30, £20, €23, $30 CAD, $30 AUD). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 294 pages, with bibliography and illustrations. Individual essays in this book have been reprinted with permission of the respective copyright owners.

Other Formats Available: 978-1-60235-229-2 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20, £14, €16, $20 CAD, $20 AUD)

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Description

The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2010 represents the result of a nationwide conversation—beginning with journal editors, but expanding to teachers, scholars and workers across the discipline of Rhetoric and Composition—to select essays that showcase the innovative and transformative work now being published in the field’s independent journals. Representing both print and digital journals in the field, the essays featured here explore issues ranging from classroom practice to writing in global and digital contexts, from writing workshops to community activism. Together, the essays provide readers with a rich understanding of the present and future direction of the field.

In addition to the introduction by Steve Parks, Linda Adler-Kassner, Brian Bailie, and Collette Caton, the anthology features work by the following authors and representing these journals: John Harbord (Across the Disciplines), Jill McCracken (Community Literacy Journal), Amy M. Patrick (Composition Forum), Laurie E. Gries and Collin Gifford Brooke (Composition Studies), James E. Porter (Computers and Composition), Amy Robillard (JAC), Janet Bean and Peter Elbow (Journal of Teaching Writing),Virginia Kuhn (Kairos),  Christine Tulley and Kristine Blair (Pedagogy), Christopher Wilkey and Bonnie Neumeier (Reflections), and David Bartholomae (Writing on the Edge).

About the Editors

Steve Parks is Associate Professor of Writing at Syracuse University. He is author of Class Politics: The Students’ Right To Their Own Language and Gravyland: Writing Beyond the Curriculum in the City of Brotherly Love, as well as co-editor/publisher of over fifteen community press publications. He has also served as editor of Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service-Learning and Community Literacy and is currently Executive Director of New City Community Press (www.newcitycommunitypress.org).

Linda Adler-Kassner is author, co-author, or co-editor of seven books and over thirty-five articles and book chapters, including The Activist WPA: Changing Stories About Writers and Writing, which won the Council of Writing Program Administrators’ Best Book Award in 2010. Her research focuses broadly on the ways that audiences inside and outside the university understand writing and literacy; on how people act on those understandings (in the past and in the present); and on the implications of those actions for writing programs and institutions.

Brian Bailie is a PhD candidate in the Composition and Cultural Rhetoric program at Syracuse University. Bailie’s work focuses on the intersections of technology and activism, transnationalism and rhetoric, identity and media, and the ways activists exploit, expand, resist, and utilize these intersections to their tactical advantage. Bailie has served as contributor, associate editor, and special issue editor for Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service-Learning, and Community Literacy. His most recent publications have appeared in the KB Journal and Composition Forum.

Collette Caton is a PhD student in the Composition and Cultural Rhetoric program at Syracuse University. Her research interests include feminist rhetorics, digital writing, media studies, and working-class rhetorics. She has presented conference papers at CCCC, Computers & Writing, and Feminisms & Rhetorics, and she has served as a contributor, associate editor, and special issue editor for Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service Learning and Community Literacy.

Contents

Introduction
Stephen J. Parks, Linda Adler-Kassner, Brian Bailie, and Collette Caton

Across the Disciplines
Writing in Central and Eastern Europe: Stakeholders and Directions in Initiating Change
John Harbord

Community Literacy Journal
Street Sex Work: Re/Constructing Discourse from Margin to Center
Jill McCracken

Composition Forum
Sustaining Writing Theory
Amy M. Patrick

Composition Studies
An Inconvenient Tool: Rethinking the Role of Slideware in the Writing Classroom
Laurie E. Gries and Collin Gifford Brooke

Computers and Composition
Recovering Delivery for Digital Rhetoric
James E. Porter

JAC
Pass It On: Revising the Plagiarism Is Theft Metaphor
Amy Robillard

The Journal of Teaching Writing
Freewriting and Free Speech: A Pragmatic Perspective
Janet Bean and Peter Elbow

Kairos
Speaking with Students: Profiles in Digital Pedagogy
Virginia Kuhn, with DJ Johnson and David Lopez

Pedagogy
Remediating the Book Review: Toward Collaboration and Multimodality across the English Curriculum
Christine Tulley and Kristine Blair

Reflections
Engaging Community Literacy through the Rhetorical Work of a Social Movement
Christopher Wilkey

Interview with Bonnie Neumeier
Christopher Wilkey

Writing on the Edge
Everything Was Going Quite Smoothly Until I Stumbled on a Footnote
David Bartholomae

About the Editors

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The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2011

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-312-1

Edited by Steve Parks, Brenda Glascott, Brian Bailie, Heather Christiansen, and Stacey Waite

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-312-1 (Paperback; $34; £23;  $34 CAD; €27; $34 AUD); 978-1-60235-313-8 (Adobe eBook; $20; £14;  $34 CAD; €16; $20 AUD). 361 pages with illustration, notes, and bibliographies. © 2013 by Parlor Press. Individual essays in this book have been reprinted with permission of the respective copyright owners.

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Description

The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2011 represents the result of a nationwide conversation—beginning with journal editors, but expanding to teachers, scholars and workers across the discipline of Rhetoric and Composition—to select essays that showcase the innovative and transformative work now being published in the field’s independent journals. Representing both print and digital journals in Rhetoric and Composition, the essays featured here explore issues ranging from classroom practice to writing in global and digital contexts, from writing workshops to community activism. Together, the essays provide readers with a rich understanding of the present and future direction of the field.

In addition to the introduction by Steve Parks, Brenda Glascott, Brian Bailie, Heather Christiansen, and Stacey Waite, the anthology features work by the following authors and representing these journals: David Bartholomae and Beth Matway (Across the Disciplines), Beverly J. Moss (Community Literacy Journal), Michael J. Faris and Stuart Selber (Composition Forum), Jessica Enoch (Composition Studies), Alex Reid (Enculturation), Guillaume Gentil (Journal of Second Language Writing), Deborah Rossen Knill (The Journal of Teaching Writing),  Melissa M. Patchan, Christian D. Schunn, and Russell J. Clark (Journal of Writing Research), Marc C. Santos (Kairos), Ellen Cushman (Pedagogy), Zandra L. Jordan (Reflections), and Kimberly K. Gunter (Writing on the Edge).

About the Editors

Steve Parks is Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University. He is the author of Class Politics: The Movement for a Students’ Right To Their Own Language 2e (Parlor Press, 2013) and Gravyland: Writing Beyond the Curriculum in the City of Brotherly Love. With Paula Mathieu and Tiffany Rousculp, he co-edited Circulating Communities: The Tactics and Strategies of Community Publishing. Working with Samantha Blackmon and Cristina Kirklighter, he has co-edited Listening to our Elders: Writing and Working for Change, a research project supported by NCTE. He has also published in College English, Journal of College Composition and Communication, and Community Literacy Journal. Over the past ten years, he has directed New City Community Press (newcitypress.com).

Brenda Glascott is an Assistant Professor at California State University specializing in Composition/Rhetoric.  She is working on a book project about gender and 19th century evangelical literacy practices.  She is publishing articles about 19th century evangelical constructions of literacy, about public writing and the public sphere, and about service learning.  She is part of an editorial collective starting a new scholarly journal, Literacy in Composition Studies. Glascott was named a Finalist for the 2008 NCTE Promising Researcher Award for her historical research on 19th century evangelical literacy narratives.

Brian Bailie is a PhD candidate in the Composition and Cultural Rhetoric program at Syracuse University. His work focuses on the intersections of protest and media, technology and transnationalism, identity and material rhetoric, and the ways activists exploit, expand, resist, and utilize these intersections to their advantage. Bailie has served as contributor, associate editor, and special issue editor for Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service-Learning, and Community Literacy. His most recent publications have appeared in the KB Journal and Composition Forum.

Heather Christiansen is a PhD student in the Rhetoric, Communication and Information Design program at Clemson University. Her research interests include visual rhetoric, the rhetoric of branding, identity, user experience design, consumer behavior and social influence. She currently serves as the managing editor for The WAC Journal.

Stacey Waite is currently Assistant Professor of English in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Nebraska—Lincoln.  Waite’s essays on the teaching of writing have appeared in Writing on the Edge, Reader, and Feminist Teacher. Waite has also published three collections of poems: Choke (winner of the 2004 Frank O'Hara Prize), Love Poem to Androgyny (Main Street Rag, 2006), and the lake has no saint (Tupelo Press, 2010). Other honors include an Andrew Mellon Dissertation Fellowship Award, the Elizabeth Baranger Excellence in Teaching Award, three Pushcart Prize nominations, and a National Society of Arts & Letters Poetry Prize. Waite has a recent interview online at Pilot Light: A Journal of 21st Century Poetics and Criticism and a forthcoming collection of poems, Butch Geography, from Tupelo Press in 2013.

Contents

Introduction
Steve Parks, Brenda Glascott, Brian Bailie, Heather Christiansen, and Stacey Waite

Across the Disciplines
The Pittsburgh Study of Writing
David Bartholomae and Beth Matway

Community Literacy Journal
“Phenomenal Women,” Collaborative Literacies, and Community Texts in Alternative “Sista” Spaces
Beverly J. Moss

Composition Forum
E-Book Issues in Composition: A Partial Assessment and Perspective for Teachers
Michael J. Faris and Stuart Selber

Composition Studies
Changing Research Methods, Changing History: A Reflection on Language, Location, and Archive
Jessica Enoch

Enculturation
Exposing Assemblages: Unlikely Communities of Digital Scholarship, Video, and Social Networks
Alex Reid

Journal of Second Language Writing
A Biliteracy Agenda for Genre Research
Guillaume Gentil

The Journal of Teaching Writing
Flow and the Principle of Relevance: Bringing Our Dynamic Speaking Knowledge to Writing
Deborah Rossen Knill

Journal of Writing Research
Writing in Natural Sciences: Understanding the Effects of Different Types of Reviewers on the Writing Process
Melissa M. Patchan, Christian D. Schunn, and Russell J. Clark

Kairos
How the Internet Saved My Daughter and How Social Media Saved My Family
Marc C. Santos

Pedagogy
New Media Scholarship and Teaching: Challenging the Hierarchy of Signs
Ellen Cushman

Reflections
Found” Literacy Partnerships: Service and Activism at Spelman College
Zandra L. Jordan

Writing on the Edge
“In Our Names”: Rewriting the U.S. Death Penalty
Kimberly K. Gunter

About the Editors

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The Bodies

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-285-8

Christopher Sindt

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-285-8 (paperback, $14; £10; $15 CAD; €12; $14 AUS); 978-1-60235-286-5 (ebook, $14; £10; $15 CAD; €12; $14 AUS) © 2012 by Parlor Press. 113 pages.

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What people are saying . . .

The “flickering body” in Christopher Sindt’s new poems is luminous and personal, and serves as a guide. We are taken passionately into a world of disappearing wetlands, herons, oaks, apple grasses, dunes, and sea figs, beyond clarity and certainty. These poems are meditative histories of the natural world. They leap into the wild of earth, of feeling, and of language. —Jane Miller

Impossible perhaps—he thinks—to read the world, to sing it, to offer up its names.  Yet, as Christopher Sindt reminds us in this probing and often startling collection, the world, that world, is all that is the case, with its Dantescan windings and sudden, Ovidian transformations.  His encounters with it here, at once lyric and elegiac, tacitly argue that this “temporary world” might just be enough. —Michael Palmer

Tracing the intertidal circuits of story and understory, of body and soul, of land and sea, Christopher Sindt’s sensitive and intelligent poetry offers “a foundation for becoming.”  Acutely attentive to the ways ecology and its theology sing in harmony, The Bodies strikes chords—voices and forms laid among and alongside each other.  Here, the reader enters into the ways we all “must travel the land of/duplicate forms, hip bone of rabbit chasing after hip bone of fox.”  Sindt guides us through this terrain, from false clarity to a truer knowledge full of “seams and breaches.”  This is tide, song,  transfiguring body: a poetry to be embraced with “both arms please.” —Elizabeth Robinson

About the Author

Christopher Sindt is an Associate Professor of English at Saint Mary’s College of California, where he teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and serves as the Vice Provost for Graduate and Professional Studies. He lives in Oakland, California with his wife Leigh, his daughter Halina, and his son Luke. He is the author of the chapbook, The Land of Give and Take (Momotombo Press, 2002).

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The Book of Isaac

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-373-2

Aidan Semmens

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-373-2 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-374-9 (Adobe ebook, $14). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 83 pages.

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Reviews

Peter Riley on Narrative Poetry The Fortnightly Review

The Book of Isaac is surely one of the most fascinating books of poetry to be published this year . . .

Friday Pick (B O D Y: Poetry. Prose. Word.) by Stephan Delbos, 8 February 2013.

Description

The Book of Isaac is a sequence of 56 “distressed,” or damaged, sonnets in which Aidan Semmens endeavors to distil something of the Russian-Jewish experience from the history of his own family, in particular that of his great-grandfather, the economist, lawyer, journalist and socialist Isaac Hourwich. Drawing material from the apocryphal Book of Esdras, from FBI files and other historical sources as well as from Hourwich’s private and public writings, Semmens produces a fractured narrative running from the pogroms of the late nineteenth century through the beginnings of the American diaspora, to the Revolution and beyond. Other characters whose words or deeds are featured include the author’s grandmother, who as a young child was effectively orphaned when her mother was exiled to Siberia, and who later escaped the Russian civil war by marrying an English sailor; and her elder brother Nicholas Hourwich, the first leader of the Communist Party of the United States.

The disrupted syntax and sometimes unexpected word-use embody the theme of migration and dislocation and the experience of living in societies whose language is not wholly familiar to the user; much use has been made, in the process of composition, of translation, retranslation and mistranslation, thereby creating oblique effects, ambiguities, misunderstandings—and new understandings. The whole sequence, however, tells a fascinating and moving story and informative endnotes provide contexts and the means to make coherent sense of whatever might otherwise be difficult or unclear.

About the Author

As a student at Cambridge in the 1970s, Aidan Semmens was chairman of the Cambridge Poetry Society, co-editor of the influential Perfect Bound magazine, and winner of the Chancellor’s Medal for an English Poem in 1978, the same year his first pamphlet of verse appeared in print in the United Kingdom. His poems have appeared in Jacket, Jack, Shearsman, Shadowtrain, Stride, Great Works, Free Verse, Blackbox Manifold, Likestarlings, Poetry Wales, Tears in the Fence, and Notre Dame Review. His first full-length collection, A Stone Dog, was published by Shearsman Books in 2011. He has also edited an anthology of poetry from the English county of Suffolk, By The North Sea, for publication in 2013.

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The Centrality of Style

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-352-7

Edited by Mike Duncan and Star Medzerian Vanguri

Perspectives on Writing Series (The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-422-7 (paperback, $40); 978-1-60235-423-4 (hardcover, $80); 978-1-60235-424-1 (Adobe eBook, $20) © 2013 by Mike Duncan and Star Medzerian Vanguri. 374 pages with notes and bibliography.

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Description

In The Centrality of Style, editors Mike Duncan and Star Medzerian Vanguri argue that style is a central concern of composition studies even as they demonstrate that some of the most compelling work in the area has emerged from the margins of the field. Calling attention to this paradox in his foreword to the collection, Paul Butler observes, “Many of the chapters work within the liminal space in which style serves as both a centralizing and decentralizing force in rhetoric and composition. Clearly, the authors and editors have made an invaluable contribution in their collection by exposing the paradoxical nature of a canon that continues to play a vital role in our disciplinary history.” Contributors include Nora Bacon, Jonathan Buehl, Paul Butler, Rosanne Carlo, Mike Duncan, Erik Ellis, William FitzGerald, Crystal Fodrey, Moe Folk, Russell Greer, Chris Holcomb, M. Jimmie Killingsworth, William C. Kurlinkus, Zak Lancaster, Tom Pace, Luke Redington, Keith Rhodes, Denise Stodola, and Star Medzerian Vanguri.

About the Editors

Mike Duncan is an assistant professor of English at the University of Houston-Downtown, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in professional writing and rhetoric. He has published articles on style and related issues in journals including College English, JAC, and Rhetoric Society Quarterly, as well as in edited collections.

Star Medzerian Vanguri is an assistant professor in the Division of Humanities at Nova Southeastern University. She teaches first-year composition and courses in writing and rhetoric at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her research interests include style, discourse analysis, authorship, and classroom writing assessment. Her article, “Style and the Pedagogy of Response,” in the journal Rhetoric Review, explores the intersections of these interests.

Contents

Foreword by Paul Butler
Introduction to the Centrality of Style, Mike Duncan & Star Medzerian Vanguri

Part One: Conceptualizing Style
Introduction to Part One: Conceptualizing Style, Mike Duncan & Star Medzerian Vanguri
An Ethics of Attentions: Three Continuums of Classical and  Contemporary Stylistic Manipulation for the 21st Century  Composition Classroom by William C. Kurlinkus
Stylistic Sandcastles: Rhetorical Figures as Composition’s  Bucket and Spade by William FitzGerald
Using Stylistic Imitation in Freshman Writing Classes: The  Rhetorical and Meta-Rhetorical Potential of Transitions in  Geoffrey of Vinsauf’s Medieval Treatises by Denise Stodola
Architectonics and Style by Russell Greer
Making Style Practically Cool and Theoretically Hip by Keith Rhodes
Jim Corder’s Generative Ethos as Alternative to Traditional  Argument, or Style’s Revivification of the Writer-Reader  Relationship by Rosanne Carlo
Teaching Style as Cultural Performance by Chris Holcomb and M. Jimmie Killingsworth
Inventio and Elocutio: Language Instruction at St. Paul’s  Grammar School and Today’s Stylistic Classroom1 by Tom Pace
The Research Paper As Stylistic Exercise by Mike Duncan

Part Two: Applying Style
Introduction to Part Two: Applying Style by Mike Duncan & Star Medzerian Vanguri
Style in Academic Writing by Nora Bacon
Tracking Interpersonal Style: The Use of Functional  Language Analysis in College Writing Instruction by Zak Lancaster
Multimodal Style and the Evolution of Digital Writing Pedagogy by Moe Folk
Voice, Transformed: The Potentialities of Style Pedagogy  in the Teaching of Creative Nonfiction by Crystal Fodrey
Fighting Styles: The Pedagogical Implications of Applying  Contemporary Rhetorical Theory to the Persuasive Prose  of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Hays by Luke Redington
Style and the Professional Writing Curriculum: Teaching  Stylistic Fluency through Science Writing by Jonathan Buehl
Toward a Pedagogy of Psychic Distance by Erik Ellis
What Scoring Rubrics Teach Students (and Teachers) about Style by Star Medzerian Vanguri

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The Curiosities

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-239-1

Brittany Perham

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-239-1 (paperback, $14; £10; $15 CAD; €11; $15 AUS); 978-1-60235-240-7 (Adobe ebook on CD, $14; £10; $15 CAD; €11; $15 AUS) © 2012 by Parlor Press. 72 pages.

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Description

Brittany Perham's first collection, The Curiosities, fixes its sure and unsettling gaze on daughters and fathers, sisters and brothers, madness, sickness, longing and love. These poems make up a cabinet of curiosities because they hold what is fascinating or frightening, beautiful or awesome— a "stomach plumed by syringe," a "zoo's lost leopard," a "forest of high-waisted trees"— up to the eye. In their image-making, the poems place language itself beneath the glass slide of a microscope in order to discern its component structures, its natural patterns. Curiosity here is a way of looking—unsatisfiable, looping back on itself, yielding only further questions. In these uncanny and passionate poems our own lives are made strange to us, and we are wonderstruck.

The poems in The Curiosities make a powerful system, almost an atmosphere out of stories of the body and memories of place. In poem after poem, the speaker is mysterious but never remote; the language is deliberate but never staged. And at all times, the music, intensity and craft of the work bring us close. This is a wonderful debut collection. —Eavan Bolan

With curatorial precision and a starling's penchant for multiple threads in both song and shelter, Brittany Perham has fashioned a haven of curiosities captivating to the ear as well as the eye. These poems dream in color and sound: bright, chantant, lifting and lowering the music and the light, so that we are transported from this world into the antechambers of the heart and back again. You cannot re-enter the waking world after reading these lucid, eloquent poems and not feel forever changed. —D. A. Powell

As with all wunderkammern, cabinets of curiosities, it is the quality of the collected wonders that matters. A brother's illness, a family's disintegration and abiding bonds, the odd dignity of children, a teacher's suicide, loss and redemption of a vital love—these old stories, in Brittany Perham's hands, become new. Poems whose titles derive from other poets and poems—Wyatt, Frost, Dickinson, nursery rhyme—serve as touchstones, letting us know that although a "hard season" of strange forsaking has passed, in its wake is a coming to terms with pain's exactitude and the happinesses that, as Dickinson said, "would be life." In "Afterlove," the poet describes her wary hope as "stiff carriers crowd[ing] / my rooms, an army of competing clatter / and rust," yet she dares to further hope: "I saw there was something still / for each of us to want. // Gulls dispersed, white / above the roofline, so white / I could not tell / one from the other, nor one / from the sky." Such ecstasy and oneiric yearning are just two marvels of this irresistible collection. —Lisa Russ Spaar

Brittany Perham is a Jones Lecturer in Poetry at Stanford University, where she was a Wallace Stegner Fellow from 2009-2011. Her work may be found in the Bellevue Literary Review, Drunken Boat, Lo-Ball, Southern Poetry Review, TriQuarterly, and elsewhere. She lives in San Francisco.

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The English Language: From Sound to Sense

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-180-6

Gerald P. Delahunty and James J. Garvey

Perspectives on Writing Series (The WAC Clearinghouse and Parlor Press)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-180-6 (paperback, $40; £28; $41 CAD; €32; $45 AUS) ©2010 by Gerald P. Delahunty. 476 pages, with notes, glossaries, exercises, illustrations, and index. This title is also available online through the WAC Clearinghouse.

Other Formats Available
978-1-60235-181-3 (Adobe eBook, $20; £14; $21 CAD; €16; 23 AUS)

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Description

Grounded in linguistic research and argumentation, The English Language: From Sound to Sense offers readers who have little or no analytic understanding of English a thorough treatment of the various components of the language. Its goal is to help readers become independent language analysts capable of critically evaluating claims about the language and the people who use it. Written in a clear style, The English Language guides its readers on topics including basic assumptions about language and discourse, pronunciation, word-formation strategies, parts of speech, clause elements and patterns, how clauses can be combined into sentences, and how clauses and sentences can be modified to suit speakers’ and writers’ discourse purposes.

The English Language avoids presenting the language as set of arbitrary facts by grounding its conclusions in the analytic methods that have characterized the best grammatical and linguistic practices for hundreds of years.  Although its perspectives derive from modern-traditional and generative grammar, its goal is to provide its readers with a broad spectrum of basic knowledge about English. Its stance is rigorously descriptive, but the object of its description is the standard variety of the language, thus making it an invaluable resource compatible with a wide range of purposes, including educated engagement with the language issues that periodically convulse the media and educational institutions.

Each chapter contains a glossary of terms, a list of readings, and numerous exercises (many using authentic texts).

About the Authors

Gerald P. Delahunty is Associate Professor of Linguistics and English and Assistant Chair of the Colorado State University Department of English, where he teaches courses on all aspects of linguistics and occasional courses on Irish literature. He has published on syntactic theory, English syntax, sociolinguistics, and Irish archaeology.

James J. Garvey taught linguistics and literature courses in the Department of English at Colorado State University. He died tragically in 2006.


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The Forever Notes

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-370-1

Ethel Rackin

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-370-1 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-371-8 (Adobe eBook, $12). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 75 pages.

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The poems of The Forever Notes are canny and lyrical and never a word too long. Many are song-like, repeating the things that are most important to them over and over to make them stay:  “You and the trees/ Trees and the night around you.”  Others tell small stories, utterly clear line by line but elusive, almost elegiac, in their slides of feeling and shifts of thought. They feel like a life you must have lived but can’t quite remember, like a dream you try to tell even as it fades behind you. Ethel Rackin’s wistful and whimsical “Notes” and “Pictures” and “Songs” are brief glances and glancing blows, each so understated and tantalizing that it seems to call for another and another, until without quite realizing it you’ve read the book straight through. —James Richardson

Plato wrote in the Timaeus of time as the moving image of eternity. In Ethel Rackin’s The Forever Notes each of these terms finds resonance: the fleeting objects of the world are moving, and persons moved; her lyric syntax builds pictures that dissolve into song and then turn back to image again; the eternal endures in its endless transformations. “Leaves are for changing” she observes—an insight just as true of the leaves of her book. —Susan Stewart

Ethel Rackin’s lyrical sound bites have a mysterious hold. In them, the visual and the aural are inextricably linked. “Adrift in internal music,” is how she puts it. Her notes are notations that produce pictures of the real world, but those notes also create songs. “Each object has a title,” says Rackin; her poems demonstrate that each object has musical depth, too. The result is beautiful: “A song that reaches as far as an eye can see.” —David Trinidad

Everyone should read this book because it is so effective and unique. The book will make you ache, whether or not you’re an artist.  It will intrigue you.  Its objects—trees, chocolate, wheelbarrows, a ship on the sea, nightgowns, rug samples, a garden, a femur bone, cookies, a blind bird, curbs, scotch—have a relationship with the speaker and with us that is personal, moving, isolated, lonely, and longing. In a shattered world we recognize as very close to ours and also see as an exotic destination, there is a song overall as if we were hearing it in a woods, or on the ocean, or in a city, hearing it from somewhere and compelled to find it.  It’s this new, essential poet. —Arthur Vogelsang

About the Author

Ethel Rackin was born in Philadelphia. Her work has appeared in The American Poetry Review, Colorado Review, Court Green, Evergreen Review, Poetry East, Volt, and elsewhere. She earned her MFA from Bard College and her PhD in English Literature from Princeton University. She has taught at Penn State Brandywine, Haverford College, and Bucks County Community College in Pennsylvania, where she is currently an assistant professor.

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The Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing: Scholarship and Applications

$34.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-929-1

Edited by Nicholas N. Behm, Sherry Rankins-Robertson, and Duane Roen

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-929-1 (paperback, $34); 978-1-60235-930-7 (hardcover, $68); 978-1-60235-931-4 (PDF on CD, $20) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 332 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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What People Are Saying

"Some people within the United States seem caught up in extreme fear, expressed in isolationism, Islamophobia, and other bigotries. Certainly there is call for caution and for vigilance, but extremists don't particularly like these words: they want to ban Muslims from entering the United States, to put certain people in internment camps, to refuse to accept any refugees from Syria and other countries. It's a very dispiriting time, here at the end of 2015, and it's hard to find examples of people thinking clearly and cogently, which is one reason I have been so drawn to the work of this volume that is dedicated to developing young people's abilities to think clearly and cogently—and creatively and ethically as well." —Andrea A. Lunsford (from the Afterword)

Description

The Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing: Scholarship and Applications illustrates the widespread applications of the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing, especially the eight habits of mind, in helping students to be successful not only in postsecondary writing courses but also in four arenas of life: academic, professional, civic, and personal. Chapters focus on a wide range of research, theory, and practice related to using the habits of mind and other features of the Framework to enhance teaching and learning.

With a Foreword by Peggy O'Neill, Linda Adler-Kassner, Cathy Fleischer, and Anne-Marie Hall and an Afterword by Andrea A. Lunsford.

Additional contributors include Nicholas Behm, Ellen C. Carillo, Beth Brunk-Chavez, Angela Clark-Oates, Dana Driscoll, Andrea Feldman, Amy C. Kimme Hea, Alice S. Horning, Lauren S. Ingraham, Kristine Johnson, Peter H. Khost, Faith Kurtyka, Amanda Laudig, Andrea A. Lunsford, Alice Johnston Myatt, Dawn S. Opel, Lori Ostergaard, Rebecca Powell, Sherry Rankins-Robertson, Rodrigo Joseph Rodríguez, Duane Roen, Cathy Rorai, Jenna Pack Sheffield, Ellen Shelton, Martha A. Townsend, and Kenneth C. Walker.

About the Editors

Nicholas N. Behm is Associate Professor of English at Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, Illinois. He studies composition pedagogy and theory, writing assessment, and critical race theory. He is a former member of the CWPA Executive Board and served on the committee charged with revising the CCCC Statement on Preparing Teachers of College Writing. With Greg Glau, Deborah Holdstein, Duane Roen, and Ed White, he is co-editor of The WPA Outcomes Statement—A Decade Later.

Sherry Rankins-Robertson is Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Writing at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR). She has served as Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs and Writing Program Administrator at UALR. Her research and publications explore designing writing assignments to respond to the national learning outcomes, developing curriculum and assessing learning in online environments, offering instruction to incarcerated writers, and using multimodal instruction. Recently, she was one of the co-editors of WPA: Writing Program Administration. She is currently working on an edited collection with Joe Lockard titled Prison Pedagogy: Teaching and Learning with Imprisoned Writers. Her publications have appeared in The Journal of Writing Assessment; Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy; Computers and Composition; Academe; WPA: Writing Program Administration; and Journal of Basic Writing and include nearly a dozen book chapters.

Duane Roen is Professor of English at Arizona State University, where he serves as Dean of the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts, Dean of University College, and Vice Provost. Duane has written about writing across the curriculum; writing curricula, pedagogy, and assessment, among other topics. His books include Views from the Center: The CCCC Chairs' Addresses, 1977–2005; The WPA Outcomes Statement: A Decade Later (with Nicholas Behm, Greg Glau, Deborah Holdstein, and Edward White); and The McGraw-Hill Guide: Writing for College, Writing for Life (with Greg Glau and Barry Maid).

Contents

Acknowledgments
Foreword: Then and Now, Reflections on the Framework Six Years Out
Peggy O'Neill, Linda Adler-Kassner, Cathy Fleischer, and Anne-Marie Hall
Introduction
Nicholas Behm, Sherry Rankins-Robertson, and Duane Roen

Scholarship
1 Framing the Framework
Kristine Johnson
2 Figuring Programmatic Agency: The Framework as Critical Rearticulatory Practice in Writing Program Administration
Amy C. Kimme Hea, Jenna Pack Sheffield, and Kenneth C. Walker
3 A Place for Reading in the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing: Recontextualizing the Habits of Mind
Ellen C. Carillo
4 Enhancing the Framework for Success: Adding Experiences in Critical Reading
Alice S. Horning
5 Steps to Collegiate Success in Second Language Writing
Andrea Feldman
6 A Writing Program's Teachers Speak: Metacognition and the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing
Dawn S. Opel
7 Messy But Meaningful: Using the Habits of Mind to Understand Extracurricular Learning
Faith Kurtyka
8 Experience, Values, and Habitus: Twelfth Graders and the Framework's Habits Of Mind
Rebecca Powell

Applications
9 The Framework for Success as Rhetorical Common Denominator
Peter H. Khost
10 The Framework for Success Goes Online: Integration of the Framework into Online Writing Courses
Beth Brunk-Chavez
11 Using the Framework to Develop a Common Core State Standards-Aligned Curriculum for First-Year Composition
Lauren S. Ingraham
12 Applications of the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing at the University of Mississippi: Shaping the Praxis of Writing Instruction
Alice Johnston Myatt and Ellen Shelton
13 Metacognitive Persistence and Cultural Knowledge: Application of the Framework with Preservice Teachers for Writing Instruction in Secondary Schools
Rodrigo Joseph Rodríguez
14 Using the Eight Habits of Mind to Foster Critical Sustained Reflections: Active Teaching and Learning
Angela Clark-Oates
15 A Framework-Based "No-Text/Two-Text" Honors Composition Course
Martha A. Townsend
16 Bridging High School and College Writing: Using the Framework to Shape Basic Writing Curricula
Lori Ostergaard, Dana Driscoll, Cathy Rorai, and Amanda Laudig
Afterword
Andrea A. Lunsford
Contributors
Index

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The Invention of Dying

$16.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-539-2

Brooke Biaz

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-539-2 (paperback, $16.00); 978-1-60235-540-8 (Adobe eBook on CD, $9.99) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 205 pages with illustrations. Cover design by Lea Anna Cardwell.

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Description

A doctor, her bats, some remote islands, their people: The Invention of Dying is a novel about searching, an exploration of the arrival of medicine where medicine has never been before, an embracing of life where one life has never known other lives. The Invention of Dying explores how we invent life and in doing so invent both our ends and, excitingly, our beginnings—one day at a time.

What People Are Saying . . .

"The Invention of Dying hums with a rare verbal and narrative energy. This is a book that will take you to places both real and imaginary that you've never been before. Its range is encyclopedic and the great comic spirit of Brooke Biaz is never far away." —Jon Cook, Professor of Literature and Director of the Centre of Creative and Performing Arts at the University of East Anglia

"Brooke Biaz here presents a cleverly and even musically worded game, that plays with the relationship between medicine and death. In a day when perfectly healthy people are regularly made miserable by being told that they have "risk factors" and require intense, burdensome medical surveillance to ward off death—a death that will come eventually regardless—a way to shake up some of our ideas about the role of medicine, and even to imagine what life might be like without doctors or hospitals, is very timely." —Howard Brody, MD, PhD, John P. McGovern Centennial Chair and Director, Institute for the Medical Humanities, The University of Texas Medical Branch

About the Author

Brooke Biaz (aka Graeme Harper) is a fiction writer, scriptwriter, and critic. Editor-in-chief of the international journal, New Writing, he is a Professor of Creative Writing, Dean of The Honors College at Oakland University, Michigan, and an Honorary Professor in England. A former Commonwealth Scholar in Creative Writing, and a National Book Council award winner, he received the first doctorate in Creative Writing awarded in Australia. He was the inaugural Chair of the Higher Education Committee at the United Kingdom's National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE).

Other Parlor Press Books by Brooke Biaz

Small Maps of the World Moon Dance Camera Phone
Price: $16.00

The Laughing Stalk: Live Comedy and Its Audiences

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-242-1

Edited by Judy Batalion

Aesthetic Critical Inquiry
Edited by Andrea Feeser

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978-1-60235-242-1 (paperback, $30; £21; $32 CAD; €24; $31 AUS) 978-1-60235-243-8 (hardcover, $60; £42; $64 CAD; €48; $62 AUS) 978-1-60235-244-5 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20; £14; $21 CAD; €16; $21 AUS) © 2012 by Parlor Press. 302 pages, with illustrations, notes, and bibliography.

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With contributions by leading scholars, writers and comedians in the USA, the UK and Canada, The Laughing Stalk: Live Comedy and Its Audiences focuses on the dynamics of audience behavior. Performers, writers, historians, producers, and theorists explore the practice and reception of live comedy performance, including cultural and historical variations in comedy audience conduct, the reception of “low” versus “high” comedy, and the differences between televised and live jokes. Contributors reflect on the subjectivity of audience members and the spread of affect, as well as the two-way relationship between joker and listener. They investigate race, sexuality and gender in humor, and contemplate the comedy club as a distinct spatial and emotional environment. The Laughing Stalk: Live Comedy and Its Audiences includes excerpts and scripts from Michael Frayne’s Audience and Andrea Fraser’s Inaugural Speech. Judy Batalion interviews noted comic writers, performers, and theater designers, including Iain Mackintosh, Shazia Mirza, Julia Chamberlain, Scott Jacobson, and Andrea Fraser. Sarah Boyes contributes a short photographic essay on comedy clubbers. Essay contributors include Alice Rayner, Matthew Daube, Lesley Harbidge, Gavin Butt, Diana Solomon, Rebecca Krefting, Kevin McCarron, Nile Seguin, Elizabeth Klaver, Frances Gray, AL Kennedy, Kélina Gotman, and Samuel Godin. The comedy duo of Sable & Batalion share their conclusions about audience responses to hip-hop theater.

About the Editor

Judy Batalion is a writer, performer, and independent scholar. She has written and performed stand-up, sketches, improv, one-woman shows, short films, and comedy theater in her native Canada, throughout the UK (where she spent a decade), and in the US. Her academic work has appeared in publications including Contemporary Theatre Review, and her journalism and personal essays have been published in newspapers, magazines and blogs, including the Washington Post, the Jerusalem Post, Salon, the Forward and Nerve. She has a BA from Harvard in the History of Science, and a PhD from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, in Art History. She currently resides in New York City.

Contents

Illustrations
Acknowledgments

Introduction: Difference at Work: The Live Comedy Audience
Judy Batalion

1 Creating the Audience: It’s All in the Timing
Alice Rayner

2 Room for Comedy
Iain Mackintosh

3 The Stand-up as Stand-in: Performer-Audience Intimacy and the Emergence of the Stand-Up Comic in the United States since the 1950s
Matthew Daube

4 A Comedic Tour de Monde
Shazia Mirza

5 Audienceship and (Non)Laughter in the Stand-up Comedy of Steve Martin
Lesley Harbidge

6 Hoyle’s Humility
Gavin Butt

7 George Lillo’s The London Merchant and the Laughing Audience
Diana Solomon

8 Laughter in the Final Instance: The Cultural Economy of Humor (Or why women aren’t perceived to be as funny as men)
Rebecca Krefting

9 Rhyme or Reason: Trying to Draw Some Conclusions about Comedy Audiences
Sable & Batalion

10 Choosing Comedy           
Julia Chamberlain

11 Seven Steps to the Stage: The Audience as Co-creator of the Stand-up Comedy Night 
Kevin McCarron

12 Hecklers: A Taxonomy
Nile Seguin

13 The Comedy Clubbers: Photographs
Sarah Boyes

14 Audience
Michael Frayn

15 Ugly Betty and the (Live) Comedy Audience
Elizabeth Klaver

16 Watching Me, Watching You: Sitcom and Surveillance
Frances Gray

17 Obscene or Absent: Literary versus Comedy Audiences
AL Kennedy

18 The Daily Show’s Studio Audience
Scott Jacobson

19 It’s My Show, Or, Shut Up and Laugh: Spheres of Intimacy in the Comic Arena and How New Technologies Play Their Part in the “Live” Act
Kélina Gotman and Samuel Godin

20 High Time for Humor
Andrea Fraser

21 Inaugural Speech
Andrea Fraser

About the Editor

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The Magnetic Brackets

$16.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-606-1

Jesús Losada
Translated by Michael Smith and Luis Ingelmo

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-606-1 (paperback, $16) 978-1-60235-607-8 (PDF, $12) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 136 pages.

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Praise for The Magnetic Brackets

"The Magnetic Brackets is one of the liveliest and truest poetical testaments that a reader can tackle in these times of disbelief, of half-truths, of vacuity and passivity in thought. For this is one more gift from the book: where thought and feeling are perfectly merged."

—Antonio Colinas

About the Author

Jesús Losada (Zamora, 1962) is the author of eleven collections of poetry, among them Huerto cerrado del amor (2nd prize, Premio Adonáis, 1994), La noche del funambulista (Premio Provincia, 1998), and Corazón frontera (Premio “San Juan de la Cruz”, 2010. He has over twenty years of professional management in cultural events and academic experience. He holds a PhD in Spanish and Portuguese Philology, as well as a BA in Romance Languages.

About the Translators

Michael Smith (Dublin, 1942–2014) is a poet whose Collected Poems was published in 2009. His translations, many in collaboration with Luis Ingelmo, of Spanish and Latin American poets are numerous and have been critically acclaimed. The latest collection of his own poems, Prayers for the Dead & Other Poems, appeared in 2014. He was a member of Aosdána, the Irish National Academy of Artists.

Luis Ingelmo (Palencia, 1970) holds degrees in English Philology and Philosophy. His cotranslations with Michael Smith include the poems of Elsa Cross, Claudio Rodríguez, and Aníbal Núñez, among many others. His translations into Spanish include works by Thomas MacGreevy, Wole Soyinka, Natasha Trethewey and Derek Walcott. He is the author of the book of short tales, La métrica del olvido [The Metrics of Oblivion], and a poetry collection, Aguapié [Pomace Wine].

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The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-467-8

Edited by Matthew Abraham and Erec Smith

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-467-8 (paperback, $27) 978-1-60235-468-5 (hardcover, $60) 978-1-60235-469-2 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 243 pages, with notes, bibliography, glossary, and index.

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Description

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion provides the first comprehensive treatment of why Obama’s rhetorical strategies were so effective during the 2008 presidential campaign, during the first four years of his presidency, and once again during the 2012 presidential campaign. From his “Yes We Can” speech, to his “More Perfect Union Speech,” to his Cairo “New Beginnings” speech, candidate-Obama-turned-President-Obama represents what a skilled rhetorician can accomplish within the public sphere. Contributors to the collection closely analyze several of Obama’s most important speeches, attempting to explain why they were so rhetorically effective, while also examining the large discursive structures Obama was engaging: a worldwide financial crisis, political apathy, domestic racism, Islamophobia, the Middle East peace process, Zionism, and more.

The Making of Barack Obama will appeal to politically engaged, intelligent readers, scholars of rhetoric, and anyone interested in understanding how the strategic use of language in highly charged contexts—how the art of rhetoric—shapes our world, unites and divides people, and creates conditions that make social change possible. For those new to the formal study of rhetoric, editors Matthew Abraham and Erec Smith include a glossary of key terms and concepts. Contributors include Matthew Abraham, René Agustin De los Santos, David A. Frank, John Jasso, Michael Kleine, Richard Marback, Robert Rowland, Steven Salaita, Courtney Jue, Erec Smith, and Anthony Wachs.

What People Are Saying . . .

From the inspiring slogans and speeches of his campaign to the eloquent successes and failures of his presidency, Barack Obama has been extravagantly praised and sarcastically criticized for the distinctive power of his rhetoric. The essays in this collection persuasively analyze that rhetoric in all its specific tactics and general strategies, in its idealist yearnings and its pragmatic compromises, in its ambitious strivings and its political obstacles. —Steven Mailloux, President’s Professor of Rhetoric, Loyola Marymount University

With its timely and engaging focus on the rhetorical performances of Barack Obama, this collection makes a significant contribution to the study of contemporary public rhetoric and political discourse. The contributors analyze a variety of political speeches—on topics ranging from racial politics, to the U.S. military’s use of torture, to conflict in the Middle East—and critically examine the rhetorical strategies employed by Obama to negotiate diverse national and international audiences, to navigate political and material constraints, and to construct and reinvent his personal and political identity. The book invites a deeper exploration into Obama’s use of persuasion, and with its analysis of how his performances before multiple and composite audiences are both flawless and flawed, enriches our understanding of how rhetorical performances function as sites for intervention and political agency and how rhetorical actions both enable and limit social change. —Mary Jo Reiff, Associate Professor of English, University of Kansas

By confronting topics often avoided in politically correct discourse—including religious identity, racial belonging and the cultural politics of difference—The Making of Barack Obama doesn’t hesitate to engage divisive and difficult issues; producing some of the most challenging, insightful and provocative perspectives to date. —Rhea Lathan, Assistant Professor of English, Florida State University

A readable yet critically engaging collection, The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion offers a robust look at the deft rhetorical strategies deployed by the first African American President. Moving beyond sentimental, hypercritical or otherwise dismissive readings of his oratory, these essays explore how Obama’s speeches have addressed substantive issues, such as globalization, the American dream, political gridlock, and the legacy of racism and religious bigotry. This book will appeal to rhetorical scholars and laypersons alike. —David G. Holmes, Professor of English, Pepperdine University

In The Making of Barack Obama, Matthew Abraham, Erec Smith and their contributors have reached the analytical depth Obama's own rhetoric warrants. Taken together, the essays in this collection treat Barack Obama's rhetoric with both the respect and suspicion it deserves; in the juxtaposition of those responses, we learn a great deal about linkages between persuasion and identity in contemporary U.S. and global politics. A difficult project pulled off very well! —Seth Kahn, Associate Professor of English, West Chester University of Pennsylvania

The Making of Barack Obamahelps us recognize how rhetoric both made and unmade Obama. These insightful essays about key speeches help us see how Obama is neither a saint nor the devil, not someone to deliver us from evil or one who defines evil. The lesson the book teaches is important: A politician with rhetorical skills can’t change the realities that shape our politics. —Robert Jensen, Professor, School of Journalism, University of Texas at Austin

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion makes a very important contribution both within and beyond the field of rhetorical studies. Within rhetorical studies, it provides one of the most comprehensive examinations of Obama’s rhetoric to date. Obama has become a popular topic for rhetorical analysis both at conferences and in journals, but this volume goes beyond those efforts by aiming to provide a definitive account of Obama’s election and first term rhetoric. By looking at Obama’s rhetoric from a variety of angles, and providing sustained, careful analysis of both his rhetorical acts and the situations and kairos that surround those acts, the book goes deeper into the president’s rhetoric than most other texts. It also provides interesting historical accounts of the invention and reception of many of Obama’s landmark speeches. In all these ways, it serves as a major contribution to both the growing body of literature on Obama’s rhetoric and the larger field of presidential rhetoric.—Ryan Weber, Assistant Professor of English, University of Alabama–Huntsville

About the Editors

Matthew Abraham is Associate Professor of English at the University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ. His work on Edward Said has appeared in Cultural Critique, Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association, Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory, College Composition and Communication, South Atlantic Quarterly, and JAC: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Rhetoric, Culture, and Politics.

Erec Smith is an Assistant Professor of English and Writing at York College of Pennsylvania. Smith has published on the connections of rhetoric and Buddhist philosophy. As a rhetorician and former diversity officer, Smith sees fecundity in the rhetorical analysis of diversity and identity constructions. He is currently exploring and publishing in Fat Studies and the effects of being labeled and self-identifying as “fat.” Smith is an editor for College Composition and Communication, and sits on the executive board of Spells Writing Lab, a community writing center based in Philadelphia.

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The Thinking Eye

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-788-4

Jennifer Atkinson

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-788-4 (paperback, $14) 978-1-60235-789-1 (PDF, $12) © 2016 by Parlor Press. 78 pages.

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Description

Jennifer Atkinson's The Thinking Eye, her fifth collection, looks at the syntax of our living, evolving world, paying close attention to the actual quartz and gnats, the goats and iced-over, onrushing rivers. The poems also look at the looking itself—how places and lives become "landscapes" and the ways the lenses of language, art, ecology, myth, and memory—enlarge and focus our seeing. If it's true, as Gaston Bachelard says, that whether a poet looks through a telescope or a microscope, [she] sees the same thing, then what Atkinson sees is an earth filled with violence and beauty, human malice and ten thousand separate moments of joy. Clearly in love with the earth and the (English) language—all those inter-dependent lives and forms—Atkinson pays attention to both with a Bishoppy eye, a Hopkinsy ear, and an ecopoet's conscience. Behind the book's sharp images and lush music creaks Chernobyl's rusty Ferris wheel.

Praise for Jennifer Atkinson's Poetry

Canticle of the Night Path
With Canticle of the Night Path Jennifer Atkinson sets in motion a deeply compelling sequence of praise songs. Whether their origins are remote in time or close to hand, the objects of her praise become intricately connected as each is illuminated in turn--by electric light, by candle-light, by lightning. She models a patient attention that gives way to sudden insights and the reader is transported by the clarity and music of her forms.—SUSAN STEWART

Drift Ice
I don't know of another poet who can, in Thoreau's words, so beautifully 'impress the winds and streams into [her] service.—ALLISON FUNK

As ice drifts in ocean currents, so these poems, keen and visionary, move on inner currents and reveal astonishing worlds within our world.—ARTHUR SZE

The Drowned City
With each rereading, The Drowned City becomes even more exciting, engaging, astonishing—for its richness of music, its agility of mind, its exactingness of vision, its unswerving ability to locate 'the silence between/ illumination and when its echo catches up' ("What Happened Next").—CARL PHILLIPS

About the Author

Jennifer Atkinson is the author of five collections of poetry—The Dogwood Tree, The Drowned City, Drift Ice, Canticle of the Night Path (New Measure Poetry Prize), and The Thinking Eye. Individual poems have appeared in various journals including Field, Image, Witness, New American Writing, and The Missouri Review. She teaches in the English Department and the MFA and BFA programs at George Mason University in Virginia.

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The Uses of Grammar 2e

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-250-6

Revised and Expanded 2nd Edition
Judith Rodby and W. Ross Winterowd

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-250-6 (paperback, $40); 978-1-60235-252-0 (Adobe ebook on CD, $20). © 2012 by Parlor Press. 352 pages, with illustrations, notes, exercises, glossary, and index.

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Preview: Review the complete table of contents and preface of The Uses of Grammar 2e (PDF).

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Instructor's Key to Exercises and Challengers (PDF download)

Description

In this second edition of The Uses of Grammar, Judith Rodby and W. Ross Winterowd develop their successful first edition with new examples, more discussion questions and exercises, and clear explanations of the grammatical principles that teach students to understand grammar conceptually and deeply. The first edition has been completely redesigned visually to enhance learning and retention. Rodby and Winterowd’s The Uses of Grammar 2e is an accessible approach grounded in deep understanding of language acquisition, structure, and even the rhetoric of everyday use. The Uses of Grammar 2e integrates traditional, structural, and functional concepts with ideas from contemporary linguistics and grammatical study. Rather than simply partition the study of grammar from the bottom up—from the parts to the whole—Rodby and Winterowd employ a unique structure based on the differentiation of form and function. This structure is framed around three questions: What are the forms in the grammar of American English? How do those forms function in that grammar? How are they used in real-life speaking and writing to achieve specific purposes? Students may learn, for example, how a variety of forms (including nouns, pronouns, verbals, and clauses) can all function as nominals. This form/function approach ensures that students learn the uses of grammar as both an object of study and as the living text of social interaction.

The Uses of Grammar 2e thus uses living language to illustrate the practical applications of grammar in our lives. These examples are drawn from a wide variety of sources—newspapers, magazines, books, and the writings of undergraduate students--and from such writers and speakers as Ronald Reagan, Shirley Chisholm, Groucho Marx, Mark Twain, and Jane Addams. Class-tested and refined to be student- and instructor-friendly, The Uses of Grammar 2e also features "For Discussion" sections that enhance students' understanding of the principles covered in the text and encourage classroom discussion. “Using Grammar” sections show students how to think about grammar’s function in social relations. “Language Learning” sections summarize critical concepts. Chapter Previews and Chapter Reviews help students anticipate the new principles, rules, and concepts to follow and reinforce learning. Exercises ask students to rehearse new learning, and Challengers ask them to apply this learning to broader issues or more complex problems.

About the Authors

Judith Rodby joined the faculty at California State University, Chico in 1989 after finishing her PhD in the rhetoric, linguistics, and literature program at the University of Southern California. She has been the composition coordinator, writing center director, and coordinator of basic writing. She is currently working primarily in the field of English education and is coordinator for the National Writing Project's National Reading Initiative. She has published in composition, ESL, youth development, and English education.

W. Ross Winterowd was the Bruce R. McElderry Professor Emeritus, University of Southern California, where he founded its PhD program in Rhetoric, Linguistics, and Literature. He authored, coauthored, or edited many essays, reviews, poems, and books, including Searching For Faith: A Skeptic’s Journey (2004, Parlor Press), Senior Citizens Writing (2007, Parlor Press), Attitudes: Selected Prose and Poetry (2010, Parlor Press), The Culture and Politics of Literacy (1989, Oxford), and The English Department: An Institutional and Personal History (1998, Southern Illinois). In 2010, he received the field’s highest honor, the Exemplar Award, from the Conference on College Composition and Communication. He passed away in January, 2011, shortly after completing work on The Uses of Grammar.

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Price: $40.00

The WAC Journal

$25.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-394-7

Submissions

The WAC Journal invites article submissions. We are interested in all WAC-related topics and especially those that offer new insights on WAC ambitions, concerns, or problems. Perhaps you have new data from a study or can apply a theory not applied before to shed new insights on an important aspect of WAC. Or maybe you can draw on your experiences and thinking, while referring to published scholars, to help readers think in a new way about a WAC problem or untapped potential.  Any discipline-standard documentation style (MLA, APA, etc.) is acceptable, but please follow such guidelines carefully. For general inquiries, contact David Blakesley, the managing editor, via email (wacjournal@parlorpress.com). Send informal proposals to Roy Andrews, editor, via email (wacjournal@parlorpress.com).

Submissions are open, so use the Submittable button below to submit articles for review. The WAC Journal is an open-access, blind, peer-viewed journal published annually by Clemson University, Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse.

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Subscriptions

The WAC Journal is an open-access, blind, peer-viewed journal published annually by Clemson University, Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse. It is published annually in print by Parlor Press and Clemson University. Digital copies of the journal are simultaneously published at The WAC Clearinghouse in PDF format for free download. Print subscriptions support the ongoing publication of the journal and make it possible to offer digital copies as open access.

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The WPA Outcomes Statement—A Decade Later

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-296-4

Edited by Nicholas N. Behm, Gregory R. Glau, Deborah H. Holdstein, Duane Roen, and Edward M. White

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-296-4 (paperback, $32) 978-1-60235-297-1 (hardcover, $65) 978-1-60235-298-8 (Adobe ebook, $20; downloadable in Dec. 2013) © 2013 by Parlor Press. 344 pages, with notes, bibliography, appendix, and index.

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Description

The WPA Outcomes Statement—A Decade Later addresses the national and global dispersion and influence of the Council of Writing Program Administrators’ Outcomes Statement ten years after its adoption and publication. Relating how the Outcomes Statement informs the work of writing programs, writing centers, and English departments, the essays demonstrate the significant influence of the Outcomes Statement in and across institutions in various institutional categories. The WPA Outcomes Statement—A Decade Later contributes to the scholarly conversation by discussing relevant issues of assessment and accountability in institutional contexts. Edited by Nicholas N. Behm, Gregory R. Glau, Deborah H. Holdstein, Duane Roen, and Edward M. White, the collection also interrogates the politics that may pervade writing programs as writing program administrators attempt to adapt the Outcomes Statement to suit local institutional contexts, implement the revised outcomes, and develop curricula that support and manifest those outcomes. The collection explores programmatic issues that may result from its implementation and corresponding assessment strategies for measuring its impact on student learning.

The WPA Outcomes Statement—A Decade Later serves as an informative resource for former, current, and future writing program administrators, scholars within composition studies and writing program administration, and other stakeholders concerned about writing programs, writing assessment, and the teaching of writing.

Contributors include Linda Adler-Kassner, Paul Anderson, Chris M. Anson, Darsie Bowden, Lizbeth A. Bryant, Micheal Callaway, Barbara J. D’Angelo, Debra Frank Dew, J. S. Dunn, Jr., Heidi Estrem, Justin Everett, Sarah Fabian, Suzanne Gray, Morgan Gresham, Teresa Grettano, Kimberly Harrison, Judy Holiday, Rebecca Ingalls, Emily Isaacs, Craig Jacobsen, Melinda Knight, Hava Levitt-Phillips, Barry M. Maid, Paul Kei Matsuda, Susan Miller-Cochran, Karen Bishop Morris, Tracy Ann Morse, Wendy Olson, Kimberly Coupe Pavlock, Deirdre Pettipiece, Sherry Rankins-Robertson, Shelley Rodrigo, Ryan Skinnell, Sarah Soebbing, Doug Sweet, Susan Thomas, Martha Townsend, Stephen Wilhoit, and Kathleen Blake Yancey.

About the Editors

Nicholas N. Behm is an Assistant Professor of English at Elmhurst College in Illinois, where he teaches courses in composition and rhetoric and studies composition pedagogy and theory, whiteness studies, and critical race theory. His research examines how first-year composition textbooks may reinforce white privilege and maintain white hegemony.

Gregory R. Glau is Associate Professor and Director of the University Writing Program at Northern Arizona University. With Duane Roen and Barry Maid, he is the co-author of The McGraw-Hill Guide: Writing for College, Writing for Life and has published numerous academic essays, especially focused on basic writing. His latest book, co-authored with Chitra Duttagupta of Utah Valley University, is Everyday Writing (Pearson, 2012).

Deborah H. Holdstein is Dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Professor of English at Columbia College Chicago. Holdstein recently completed a five-year term as editor of College Composition and Communication. She has published widely in composition and rhetoric, film, technology, and literature and has also directed the Consultant-Evaluator Service of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. She has served on the MLA Publications Committee, the Executive Board of the CWPA, the Executive Committee of CCCC, and as an Officer of the CCCC. Her most recent book, co-edited with Andrea Greenbaum, is Judaic Perspectives in Composition and Rhetoric (Hampton Press, 2008), and her work has appeared in such journals as CCC, College English, WPA: Writing Program Administration, and Pedagogy.

Duane Roen is Professor of English at Arizona State University, where he also serves as Assistant Vice Provost for University Academic Success Programs, Head of Interdisciplinary and Liberal Studies, and Head of Technical Communication. In addition to more than 250 articles, chapters, and conference presentations, he has published eight books. He has served as secretary of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (2007–2011). He currently serves as president of the Council of Writing Program Administrators (2011–2013).

Edward M. White, a Visiting Scholar at the University of Arizona, has written or edited fourteen books and about one hundred articles or book chapters on writing, writing instruction, and writing assessment. His best-known books are Teaching and Assessing Writing, which won a Shaughnessy award from the Modern Language Association in 1994, and Assessment of Writing, an MLA research volume, published in 1996. He received the 2011 Exemplar Award from CCCC, and is featured in Writing Assessment in the 21st Century: Essays in Honor of Edward M. White (Hampton, 2012).

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I: Adapting the WPA OS to Develop Curriculum
1 CWPA Outcomes Statement as Heuristic for Inventing Writing-about-Writing Curricula by Debra Frank Dew
2 The Politics of Pedagogy: The Outcomes Statement and Basic Writing by Wendy Olson
3 Building a Writing Program with the WPA Outcomes: Authority, Ethos, and Professional Identity by Kimberly Harrison
4 The Perilous Vision of the Outcomes Statement by Teresa Grettano, Rebecca Ingalls, and Tracy Ann Morse
5 The Outcomes Statement as Support for Teacher Creativity: Applying the WPA OS to Develop Assignments by Sherry Rankins-Robertson
6 Released from the Ghost of Platonic Idealism: How the Outcomes Statement Affirms Rhetorical Curricula by Doug Sweet
7 Beyond Composition: Developing a National Outcomes Statement for Writing Across the Curriculum by Paul Anderson, Chris M. Anson, Martha Townsend, and Kathleen Blake Yancey

Part II: Applying the WPA OS to Enact Programmatic, Institutional, and Disciplinary Change
8 The WPA Outcomes Statement and Disciplinary Authority by Craig Jacobsen, Susan Miller-Cochran, and Shelley Rodrigo
9 Achieving a Lasting Impact on Faculty Teaching: Using the WPA Outcomes Statement to Develop an Extended WID Seminar by Stephen Wilhoit
10 Building Clout in Non-Program Programs by Using the Outcomes Statement by Karen Bishop Morris and Lizbeth A. Bryant
11 Reframing the Conversation: Can the Outcomes Statement Help? by Darsie Bowden
12 The WPA Outcomes Statement: The View from Australia by Susan Thomas
13 Ripple Effect: Adopting and Adapting the WPA Outcomes by Morgan Gresham
14 Ethos and Topoi: Using The Outcomes Statement Rhetorically To Achieve The Centrality and Autonomy of Writing Programs by Deirdre Pettipiece and Justin Everett
15 Adoption, Adaptation, Revision: Waves of Collaborative Change at a Large University Writing Program by J.S. Dunn, Jr. Sarah Fabian, Suzanne Gray, Kimberly Coupe Pavlock, Hava Levitt-Phillips, Sarah Soebbing, Heidi Estrem, and Linda Adler-Kassner

Part III: Cultivating the Intellectual Enrichment of the WPA OS through Critique
16 Considering the Impact of the WPA Outcomes Statement on Second Language Writers by Paul Kei Matsuda and Ryan Skinnell
17 Competing Discourses within the WPA Outcomes Statement by Judy Holiday
18 Is Rhetorical Knowledge the Über-Outcome? by Barry M. Maid and Barbara J. D’Angelo
19 The WPA Learning Outcomes: What Role Should Technology Play? by Micheal Callaway
20 Assessing the Impact of the Outcomes Statement by Emily Isaacs and Melinda Knight

Appendix: WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition
Index
Contributors

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Price: $32.00

The Wabash Trilogy

$25.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-164-6

William J. Palmer

The Wabash Trilogy coverIncludes the three new novels The Wabash Baseball Blues, The Redneck Mafia, and Civic Theater

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-164-6 ($25.00; £20; €22; $28 CAD; $30 AUD); 978-1-60235-168-4 ($14.99; Adobe eBook on CD).
© 2010 by William J. Palmer. 625 pages

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Description

The Wabash Trilogy includes three new novels by William J. Palmer: The Wabash Baseball Blues, The Redneck Mafia, and Civic Theater. Each novel shows Palmer at his most poignant and hilarious as he tracks his characters through the tragicomedy of life in the Midwest.

Reviews of William J. Palmer’s “Mr. Dickens” novels . . .

And fun it is when William J. Palmer sends Charles Dickens into bawdy Mayfair in The Detective and Mr. Dickens. —New York Times Book Review

But even if you are not a mystery buff, you will enjoy The Detective and Mr. Dickens. . . . The book, a result of both imagination and expertise, is a multifaceted jewel. . . . If it doesn’t revive your interest in Dickens’ novels, it will at least provide you with the pleasure of a good mystery. —San Diego Magazine

The brightest star on the 1990 gift list . . . It is an informative, entertaining, and thoroughly exciting tale . . . and, happily, there is more to come in what could be a great new series. —St. Louis Post Dispatch

Amazingly entertaining, suspenseful reading for both mystery aficionados and literature lovers. —Booklist

It will delight fans of Victorian London in general, and of Charles Dickens in particular . . . The novel, with elegant literary flair, provides a satisfying blend of scholarship and imagination. —Chicago Sun Times

You will yearn for Palmer’s next installment. —Indianapolis News

We always talk about “escaping” into a good mystery. The phrase was never more apt than in the case of The Detective and Mr. Dickens and its sequel, The Highwayman and Mr. Dickens. —Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine

William J. Palmer is the author of the “Mr. Dickens” series of Victorian murder mysteries which have been selections of The Literary Guild, The Book of the Month Club, The Mystery Guild and The Doubleday Book Club. Two of these novels have also been optioned for feature film production. He has also written books on film history and novel criticism. He is a professor in the English Department at Purdue University and lives in West Lafayette, Indiana, in close proximity to the Wabash River.

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Price: $25.00

The Weight of My Armor

$19.95
SKU: 978-1-60235-948-2

Creative Nonfiction and Poetry by the Syracuse Veterans' Writing Group

Edited by Ivy Kleinbart, Peter McShane, and Eileen Schell

Working and Writing for Change (A Parlor Press Imprint)
Edited by Steve Parks and Jess Pauszek

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-948-2 (paperback, $19.95); 978-1-60235-949-9 (PDF on CD, $14). © 2017 by New City Community Press. 172 pages with illustrations, notes, and bibliography.

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The essays and poems in The Weight of My Armor represent the work of twenty-three members of the Syracuse Veterans' Writing Group, which meets monthly on the Syracuse University campus. Since 2010, the group has served as an intergenerational community where veterans and military family members write about their lives in and beyond the military.

The Weight of My Armor offers creative nonfiction and poetry that spans a range of military experiences, including overseas deployments and combat, military acculturation and training, adventure and camaraderie, shock and loss, and endurance and survival. This collection also addresses aspects of the military experience that receive less public attention such as gender oppression and military sexual trauma, the long-term physical and psychological costs of warfare, the complex challenges of familial and social reintegration, and the experience of growing up in a military family.

In honest and courageous voices, these writers bear witness to events and circumstances that were largely beyond their control. They also reflect on their service, representing it with the accuracy and specificity unique to first person narratives. Taken together, these pieces encourage dialogue about the personal, social, and economic costs of our nation's wars, both past and present.

Praise for The Weight of My Armor

"You can't get more authentic than this volume from the Syracuse Veterans' Group. If you've ever said to a veteran, 'Thank you for your service,' and then wondered to yourself what that service might actually have been like, this is the book for you. These stories are marked by inclusiveness, rigor, and admirable compassion." —Brian Castner, author of The Long Walk and All the Ways We Kill and Die

Contents

Introduction, Ivy Kleinbart and Eileen Schell
Gallows Humor, Jennifer Jeffery
Echoes, Don Western
February 7, Robert Marcuson
Getting Off the Bus at Boot Camp, Dawson Brown
Tough Enough, Andrew Miller
Lost, Jordan Robinson
Through the Looking Glass, Ralph Willsey
Honors, Ralph Willsey
My Father, Marissa Mims
Daddy, Did You Kill Anybody in Vietnam?, Peter McShane
Nuclear Bomber Commandos Arrive in a Rice Paddy, David Vercelloni
The Vietnam Marathon, Doug D'Elia
Morning, 1944, Benita Rogers
Betrayal, Steven Kever
Military Relations, Ginger Star Peterman
Kimmy, Bill Cross
The $8 Timex Watch, Dawson Brown
A View, Frank Hobitz
Fort Carson Snowman, Robert Marcuson
Accessorizing, Heather Faulkner
Air Force Brats Conquer Alaska, Lee Savidge
Away From Home, Andrew Miller
Fearless Leader, Tim Hansen
Lessons in Leadership, Terry Mitchell
Awakening the Toad, Bill Cross
Anniversary Day, Len Fallis
Photographs, Elizabeth (Hall) Wilmer
Demons, Ralph Willsey
The Crow, Jennifer Jeffery
The Trip Home, Dan New
War Games, Peter McShane
You Don't Have to Stop Your Thoughts: Meditation and the SVWG, Diane Grimes
Contributors

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Price: $19.95

They Who Saw the Deep

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-816-4

Geraldine Monk

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-816-4 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-817-1 (PDF on CD, $12). © 2016 by Geraldine Monk. 94 pages.

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Description

At the heart of They Who Saw the Deep is the nature of water; water as giver and taker of life, luxuriant and lethal in equal measures. From the Libyan Sea to the savage sands of Morecambe Bay to the banks of the River Lune in the north of England where the poet’s ancestors were rowed across the river in their coffins to their final resting place. The eponymous sequence of poems finds the poet in the illusory safety of her kitchen whilst the outer world grows increasingly disturbed with wars and wild weather. It is set against the backdrop of the shipping forecast and weaves the myths and legends of the ancient Mesopotamians through a litany of migrations down the ages to the present day.

Reviews, Interviews, Performances

Praise for Geraldine Monk's Poetry

You would recognize these poems even if the author was not named: the breath-taking enjambment, apparently casual anecdotes that lead into deeper truths, the tension between wordplay—the use of regional dialect words, the mixing of registers ranging from the banal to the arcane—and the terrifying events these poems enact. This is extraordinary, compelling and expansive work from one of this country's most significant poets. —Nancy Gaffield (Review, Tears in the Fence 64 (Autumn 2016)

Geraldine Monk’s poetry is a treasure and They Who Saw the Deep is extravagant proof. A vocabulary ripe to the point of ferment. Lines lithe and various. Gritty dazzle. Vertiginous control. The title sequence is a water-torn triumph, a mercurial inventory of birds, wars, seas, weathers, vegetables and wrecks. With kinetic brilliance and valorous abandon, Monk forages the deeps. —Catherine Wagner

Her poetry is always a cause for celebration...a carnival zone, various, gracious, outrageous. It unleashes the energy of wit into the field force of language itself, wit as an improvisatory method crafting voices through electrically alive craftiness.  —Adam Piette (Poetry Review)

Monk’s poetry crackles with oppositions: between the individualism of lyric utterance and the political context in which it takes place; between the opacity produced by her densely-patterned sounds and a plain-spoken brusqueness. —Paul Batchelor (The Guardian).

About the Author

Geraldine Monk's poetry was first published in the 1970s and has appeared in countless magazines and anthologies. Her main collections include Interregnum (Creation Books) and Escafeld Hangings (West House Books). The Salt Companion to Geraldine Monk edited by Scott Thurston appeared in 2007, and in 2012 she edited the collective autobiography of selected British poets in Cusp: Recollections of Poetry in Transition (Shearman Books). She is an affiliated poet at the Centre of Poetry and Poetics at The University of Sheffield, U.K.

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This History That Just Happened

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-902-4

Hannah Craig

Winner of the New Measure Poetry Prize
Selected by Yusef Komunyakaa

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-902-4 (paperback, $14); 978-1-60235-903-1 (Adobe eBook, $12) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 83 pages, in English.

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Description

This History That Just Happened is a debut collection of poems that explore the ways in which history is invented instantly through the narratives we create around intimate experiences. Inspired by a deep sense of place and geography, and drawing from the traditions of poets like Lorine Niedecker and Gustaf Sobin, these poems interweave human experience within an ever-changing natural world where a natural history is constantly being written and overwritten on the landscape and geography. The poems explore the ways in which writing history is challenged both by a lack of common/shared vocabulary (as with the physical experience of pain) as well as by experiences that throw us into conflict with our own historical perspectives. Interweaving colloquial lyricism with a natural fabula, the poems examine the ways in which it "takes a thickness to be human, a pond & pine-water sort of thickness" in a world where "pain proves the body."

What People Are Saying

Hannah Craig's This History That Just Happened places the reader at the nexus where rural and city life converge, bridging a world personal and political, natural and artful, in a voice always uniquely hers. Every word here is earned. And little, if anything, escapes this poet’s heart, mind, or eye. History works through a keen imagination. These poems make us feel and listen differently, and images coalesce line by line and dare us to reside where fierce empathy and beauty abide.—Yusef Komunyakaa

About the Poet

Hannah Craig is an Indiana native and a graduate of the University of Chicago. She won the 2016 Mississippi Review Prize and her manuscript was a finalist for the Akron Poetry Prize, the Fineline Competition, and the Autumn House Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared widely in such publications as Smartish Pace, North American Review, Fence, Mississippi Review, and Prairie Schooner.

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Toward a Critical Rhetoric on the Israel-Palestine Conflict

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-693-1

Edited by Matthew Abraham

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-693-1 (paperback, $27); 978-1-60235-694-8 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-695-5 (Adobe eBook on CD, $15) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 205 pages, with notes, illustrations, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Toward a Critical Rhetoric on the Israel-Palestine Conflict draws on critical conceptions of rhetoric to explore the ways that affective and transferential forces affect discussion of the Israel-Palestine conflict and to create openings for broader understanding. Contributors include Matthew Abraham, Anis Bawarshi, Amos Kiewe, Michael Bernard-Donals, Michael Kleine, Robert Rowland, David Frank Shai Ginsberg, and James Crosswhite.

Video Review by April O'Brien (Itineration June 2016)


What People Are Saying

Matthew Abraham has brought together leading scholars in the field of rhetorical studies to bring their insight to bear on the difficult task of discerning the impassioned rhetoric of the Israel-Palestine conflict. As those scholars make clear, the rhetoric of the Israel-Palestine conflict is as pervasive as it is divisive, reaching beyond the geography of the Middle East to influence the nature of international relations, the discourse of domestic politics, and the interactions within local communities. The contributors to the volume remind us as scholars that we have much to contribute to the pressing problems of the world. The contributors to the volume remind us as people just how imperative it is that we reflect deeply on our rhetorical choices.

—Richard Marback, Research Fellow, Center for the Study of Citizenship, Wayne State University

Kenneth Burke writes that where there is absolute division, rhetoric fails; where there is absolute identification, rhetoric is unnecessary. Consider the truth of that observation when discussion turns to the Israel-Palestine conflict. In this collection, however, we are where Kenneth Burke says rhetoric occurs: in the interstices between identification and division. Accordingly, the contributors to Toward a Critical Rhetoric on the Israel-Palestine Conflict don't avoid the binaries; they explore them—in keeping with Burke's notion of where rhetoric resides. They explore the binaries in ways that are so rare in popular discussion. We have in this collection, then, a way into the debate, if not a resolution.

—Victor Villanueva, Regents' Professor and Director of The Writing Program, Washington State University

Abraham's Toward a Critical Rhetoric on the Israeli-Palestine Conflict addresses traditional rhetorical artifacts (the media accounts that we have come to expect from collections like this since Said's Covering Islam, as well as traditional presidential public address). It also addresses less traditional rhetorical artifacts: from professional discussion lists like WPA-L, the email list for Writing Program Administrators, to the discourse around sister-city designations in Madison, Wisconsin. The contributions demonstrate the insights generated by rhetorical theories used to unpack texts, such as genre theory and rhetorical listening. Other essays draw on critical theorists such as Levinas and Ricoeur to inform close textual analysis about the most important ethical, political and economic conflict in the world.

—David Beard, Associate Professor of Rhetoric, Scientific and Technical Communication, University of Minnesota – Duluth

About the Editor

Matthew Abraham is Associate Professor of English at the University of Arizona. He is the author of Out of Bounds: Academic Freedom and the Question of Palestine (Bloomsbury, 2013) and Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine (Palgrave, 2014) and is the co-editor of The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion (Parlor, 2013). He has published in JAC: A Journal of Rhetoric, Politics, and Culture, Arab Studies Quarterly, College Composition and Communication, Logos: A Journal of Modern Society and Culture, Cultural Critique, and the Journal of Religion and Cultural Theory.

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Transcendence by Perspective

$27.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-528-6

Meditations on and with Kenneth Burke

Edited by Bryan Crable

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-528-6 (paperback, $27); 978-1-60235-529-3 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-530-9 (Adobe eBook, $20). © 2014 by Parlor Press. “Transcendence in the Barnyard: Thoughts on Strategic Approaches to the Political Art” by James F. Klumpp is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) license. 217 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Transcendence by Perspective: Meditations on and with Kenneth Burke represents a fresh attempt to think with Kenneth Burke regarding the relationship between human symbolicity and social change. The essays, by both prominent and up-and-coming young scholars, are organized around the three conceptions of transcendence that, the editor argues, can be found in Burke’s body of work: transcendence as a curative method; transcendence as a dialectical process; and transcendence as our human condition. The first, from Burke’s earliest works, reflects an attempt to resolve conflicts between opposing principles, beliefs, or persons by adopting a “higher” point of view. The second, corresponding to much of Burke’s work from the 1940s and 1950s, represents Burke’s efforts to envision a dialectical process that would result not simply in the resolution of individual conflicts, but the reordering of the frustrating stalemate of entrenched social oppositions. The third form, representing Burke’s final decades of work, positions transcendence as peculiar to the human symbolic condition—and as the source of our temptation to treat the “here and now” in terms of some greater “beyond.” Going beyond this interpretation of Burkean texts, however, the chapters apply these three notions of transcendence to the analysis of such topics as race in America, President Obama, Hilary Clinton’s health care reform efforts, Virginia’s apology for slavery, British colonialism, Dr. Phil, aesthetics, and industrial agriculture. Taken together, the volume indicates new directions for Burkean scholarship on the critical appreciation of our lives as embodied symbol-users, and of the “Human Barnyard” as a whole.

Contributors include Gregory Clark, Richard M. Coe, Bryan Crable, John B. Hatch, Cathryn Hill , Theon E. Hill, Abigail Selzer King, Andrew King, James F. Klumpp, and John S. Wright.

About the Editor

Bryan Crable is Professor of Communication and Director of the Waterhouse Family Institute for the Study of Communication and Society at Villanova University. He is the author of Ralph Ellison and Kenneth Burke: At the Roots of the Racial Divide (University of Virginia Press, 2012), has twice received the Charles Kneupper Award from the Rhetoric Society of America, and in 2011 received the Kenneth Burke Society’s Lifetime Achievement Award. His essays have appeared in The Quarterly Journal of Speech, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Rhetoric Review, Argumentation & Advocacy, Human Studies, Communication Quarterly, and Western Journal of Communication.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction

Burkean Perspectives on Transcendence: A Prospective Retrospective
Bryan Crable

1 Race Ritual, Then and Now: Bridging the Transcendental Dialectics of Kenneth Burke, Ralph Ellison, and Barack Obama
John S. Wright
2 Transcendence in the Barnyard: Thoughts on Strategic Approaches to the Political Art
James F. Klumpp
3 Rounding (Out) the Bases of Racial Reconciliation: (Dia)Logology and Virginia’s Apology for Slavery
John B. Hatch
4 From Tragedy to Comedy: A Pentadic Analysis Contrasting Hillary Clinton’s Health Care Reform Rhetoric, 1993–1994 and 2008
Theon E. Hill
5 The Good Wife (According to Dr. Phil, et al.): A Representative Anecdote of Burkean Analysis
Cathryn Hill and Richard M. Coe
6 Transcendence by Colonial Perspective: Bureaucratization, F. Max Müller, and the Sacred Books of the East (1879)
Abigail Selzer King
7 Transcendence after Dialogue
Gregory Clark
8 Kenneth Burke and the Dark Side of Transcendence: Localism, Wendell Berry, and the New Southern Agrarians
Andrew King

Contributors
Index

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Visions of Technological Transcendence: Human Enhancement and the Rhetoric of the Future

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-875-1

James A. Herrick

Rhetoric of Science and Technology
Series Editor, Alan G. Gross

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-875-1 (paperback, $32); 978-1-60235-876-8 (hardcover, $65) 978-1-60235-877-5 (PDF on CD, $20) © 2017 by Parlor Press. 240 pages with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

The human enhancement movement—with Transhumanism as its best-known and most influential manifestation—promotes dramatic mental and physical augmentations to be realized by the radical and coordinated appropriation of biotechnology and computer science. Goals of Transhumanism include immortality, the merger of humans and machines, human-level artificial intelligence, and space colonization. The discourse of human enhancement is marked by the imminent emergence of a posthuman species and the culmination of human history in a technological upheaval referred to as the Singularity.

Visions of Technological Transcendence approaches the rhetoric of human enhancement as a system of mythic narratives, each developing around a key tenet of enhancement thought.  These strategic stories are treated as myths, providing "imaginative patterns" for predicting technology's trajectory, envisioning the technological redemption of the human race, aligning the mundane world with a transcendent, technological future, and attributing a sacred quality to scientific progress. Despite their scientific cast, these narratives rest on and promote a futuristic ideology originating in a range of non-scientific sources. Chapters explore the narratives of progress, technologically directed evolution, the person as information, the posthuman as supplanting Homo sapiens, technological immortality, limitless artificial intelligence, and space colonization as human destiny. Together, these narratives constitute a contemporary mythology envisioning a comprehensive and rhetorically powerful account of a technologically transformed posthuman future.  

About the Author

James A. Herrick (PhD University of Wisconsin, MA University of California-Davis, is the Guy Vander Jagt Professor of Communication at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. He is the author of The Making of the New Spirituality, Scientific Mythologies, The Radical Rhetoric of the English Deists, Argumentation and The History and Theory of Rhetoric, and co-editor of After the Genome: A Language for our Biotechnological Future. Herrick writes and speaks about the history of rhetoric, new religious movements, and popular narratives about science and technology.

Contents

Acknowledgments
1 Introduction
2 Myth and Rhetoric
3 Envisioning the Technofuture: Antecedents
4 Progress, Inevitability, Singularity
5 From Natural Selection to Spiritual Evolution
6 Life as Information
7 Enhanced Brains, Connected Minds
8 Enhanced Humans and Posthumans
9 Extending Life, Ending Death
10 Artificial Intelligence, Superintelligence and Emergent Gods
11 Posthumans in Space
12 Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
About the Author

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Visual Rhetoric and the Eloquence of Design

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-191-2

Edited by Leslie Atzmon

Visual Rhetoric Series
Edited by Marguerite Helmers

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-191-2 (paperback, $40; £26; $40 CAD; €30; $41 AUS ). © 2011 by Parlor Press. 472 pages, including illustrations, bibliography, notes, and index.

Other Formats Available: 978-1-60235-192-9 (hardcover, $80; £52; $80 CAD; €60; $82 AUS); 978-1-60235-193-6 (Adobe eBook on CD; $24)

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Description

The essays in Visual Rhetoric and the Eloquence of Design foreground the rhetorical functions of design artifacts. Rhetoric, normally understood as verbal or visual messages that have a tactical persuasive objective—a speech that wants to convince us to vote for someone, or an ad that tries to persuade us to buy a particular product—becomes in Visual Rhetoric and the Eloquence of Design the persuasive use of a broad set of meta-beliefs. Designed objects are particularly effective at this second level of persuasion because they offer audiences communicative data that reflect, and also orchestrate, a potentially broad array of cultural concerns. Persuasion entails both the aesthetic form and material composition of any object.

Visual Rhetoric and the Eloquence of Design features ten scholarly essays steeped in rhetorical analysis of artifacts, as well as two visual essays on the topic of ornamental typography with accompanying verbal texts. The essays in this collection span a number of design disciplines, including manufacturing design, graphic design, architectural design, and monument design. Contributors include Leslie Atzmon, Gerry Beegan, Guillemette Bolens,  Kate Catterall , Barry Curtis, Michael Golec, Vladimir Kulik, Ryan Molloy, Teal Triggs, Jane Webb, Jack Williamson, and Lori Young.

About the Editor

Leslie Atzmon is Professor of Graphic Design and Design History at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan. She earned her MFA in graphic design from Eastern Michigan University, and her PhD in Design History from Middlesex University in London, England. Atzmon’s work includes visual projects as well as design historical research.  She has published articles in the journals  Design Issues and Visual Communication, and has most recently published two articles in the online version of Eye: magazine.  Atzmon has presented her work at the Design History Society conference, the Design Research Society conference, the AIGA Design Education conference, the Modern Language Association conference, and the International Conference of Design Studies and Design History. Her principle areas of research interest are late nineteenth-century fantasy imagery, book history, and the history of typography. Atzmon was awarded a Kress Foundation Pre-Dissertation Travel Fellowship in the History of Art for the 2003-2004 academic year. She is a member of the AIGA (American Institute of Graphic Artists) and the Design History Society.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Visual Rhetoric and the Special Eloquence of Design Artifacts
Leslie Atzmon

1 Visual Style and Forms of Science in the Cold War
Michael J. Golec

2 Collapse: The Erasure of Time, History, and Memory in the Urban Landscape of Northern Ireland
Kate Catterall

3 Riot Grrrl Punk: A Case Study in the Personal Politics of British Riot Grrrl Fanzines
Teal Triggs

4 Architecture and the Politics of Reading: Nikola Dobrovic and the Generalštab Building in Belgrade
Vladimir Kulic

5 The Essential Outline: John Flaxman and Neoplatonism in Early Nineteenth-Century Manufactures
Jane Webb

6 Arms Akimbo: Kinesic Analysis in Visual and Verbal Art
Guillemette Bolens

7 Industrialization, Human Agency, and the Materiality of Illustration in the Victorian Press
Gerry Beegan

8 Dinosaur Design
Barry Curtis

9 Supernatural Selection: Sidney Sime’s Weird Science
Leslie Atzmon

10 Visual Design Narratives: Detection, Meaning, and Programming
Jack Williamson

Visual Essays
Introduction: Types of Ornamental Eloquence
Leslie Atzmon

11 “Iced Up” and “Platinum Plus”: The
Development of Hip-Hop Typographic Ornaments
Ryan Molloy

12 Regen(d)erating Decoration: Cultural Narratives in Ornamented Fonts Magneto Motivity
Lori Young

Contributors
Index
About the Editor

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WAC Partnerships Between Secondary and Postsecondary Institutions

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-807-2

Edited by Jacob S. Blumner and Pamela B. Childers

Perspectives on Writing
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Rich Rice

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-807-2 (paperback, $30); 978-1-60235-808-9 (hardcover, $60); 978-1-60235-809-6 (PDF, $20). © 2016 by Jacob S. Blumner and Pamela B. Childers. 192 pages with notes and bibliography.

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Description

Working with educators at all academic levels involved in WAC partnerships, the authors and editors of this collection demonstrate successful models of collaboration between schools and institutions so others can emulate and promote this type of collaboration. The chapters in this collection describe and reflect on collaborative partnerships among middle schools, high schools, colleges, and universities that are designed to prepare students for the kinds of work and civic engagement required to succeed in and contribute to society. The WAC partnerships celebrated in this collection include frameworks to build connectivity between institutions while addressing Common Core State Standards, academic and non-academic collaborations around science education, WAC partnerships in Argentina and Germany, and both long- and short-term collaborations.

About the Editors

Jacob S. Blumner is Director of the Marian E. Wright Writing Center and Associate Professor of English at the University of Michigan-Flint. He has co-edited two books, and his work has appeared in The WAC Journal, Across the Disciplines, and Praxis: A Writing Center Journal.

Pamela B. Childers is Caldwell Chair of Composition Emerita at McCallie School and Executive Editor of The Clearing House. She has written numerous articles and chapters on WAC. Her books include The High School Writing Center, Programs and Practices: Writing Across the Secondary School (with Anne Ruggles Gere and Art Young) and ARTiculating: Teaching Writing in a Visual World (with Eric H. Hobson, and Joan A. Mullin).

Contents

Foreword by Art Young
Acknowledgments

"Serenade in a Kansas Wind" by Malcolm Childers
1 "Introduction to WAC and Partnerships That Cross Academic Levels and Disciplines" by Jacob S. Blumner and Pamela B. Childers
2 "Talking about Writing Across the Secondary and College Community" by Michelle Cox and Phyllis Gimbel
3 "Newton's Third Law Revisited: Action Reaction Pairs in Collaboration" by Michael J. Lowry
4 "Shaping Disciplinary Discourses in High School: A Two-Way Collaborative Writing Program" by Federico Navarro and Andrea Revel Chion
5 "Collaborating on Writing-to-Learn in Ninth-Grade Science: What Is Collaboration—and How Can We Sustain It?" by Danielle Myelle-Watson, Deb Spears, David Wellen, Michael McClellan, and Brad Peters
6 "In Our Own Backyard: What Makes a Community College-Secondary School Connection Work?" by Mary McMullen-Light
7 "Negotiating Expectations: Overcoming Obstacles Introducing WAC through Collaboration between a German University Writing Center and German High Schools" by Luise Beaumont, Mandy Pydde, and Simone Tschirpke
8 "So Much More Than Just an 'A': A Transformative High School and University Writing Center Partnershi" by Marie Hansen, Debra Hartley, Kirsten Jamsen, Katie Levin, and Kristen Nichols-Besel
9 "'Oh, I Get By with a Little Help from My Friends': Short-Term Writing Center/Community Collaborations" by Trixie G. Smith
10 "What We Have Learned about WAC Partnerships and Their Futures" by Jacob S. Blumner and Pamela B. Childers

Contributors

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WAC and Second Language Writers

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-503-3

Research Towards Linguistically and Cultur­ally Inclusive Programs and Practices

Edited by Terry Myers Zawacki and Michelle Cox

Perspectives on Writing Series (Parlor Press and the WAC Clearinghouse)
Series Editor: Susan H. McLeod

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-503-3 (paperback, $40); 978-1-60235-504-0 (hardcover, $80); Adobe eBook: http://wac.colostate.edu/books/ © 2014 by Terry Myers Zawacki and Michelle Cox. 490 pages, with illustrations, notes, and bibliography.

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Description

In WAC and Second Language Writers: Research Towards Linguistically and Cultur­ally Inclusive Programs and Practices, the editors and contributors pursue the ambitious goal of including within WAC theory, research, and practice the differing perspectives, educational experiences, and voices of second-language writers. The chapters within this collection not only report new research but also share a wealth of pedagogical, curricular, and programmatic practices relevant to second-language writers. Representing a range of institutional perspectives—including those of students and faculty at public universities, community colleges, liberal arts colleges, and English-language schools—and a diverse set of geographical and cultural contexts, the editors and contributors report on work taking place in the United States, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East

About the Editors

Terry Myers Zawacki is associate professor emerita of English at George Mason University. She has published on writing in the disciplines, writing assessment, WAC and L2 writing, writing centers, and writing fellows.  She serves on the editorial boards of Across the Disciplines, The WAC Journal, and the WAC Clearinghouse. She also is lead editor of the WAC Clearinghouse International Exchanges on the Study of Writing series.  

Michelle Cox is a Multilingual Specialist at Dartmouth College and former director of Bridgewater State University’s WAC program, which she launched in 2007. She has published on WAC and second-language writing as well as on composition pedagogy, identity theory, and faculty development. She serves on the editorial boards of Across the Disciplines and the WAC Clearinghouse, where she edits the pages on WAC and second-language writing.

Contents

A Note to Readers, Michelle Cox and Terry Myers Zawacki
Foreword: Multilinguality Across the Curriculum, Jonathan Hall
Introduction, Michelle Cox and Terry Myers Zawacki

Section I. Learning from/with L2 Students: Student Strengths, Coping Strategies, and Experiences as They Write Across the Curriculum

Chapter 1. Adaptive Transfer, Writing Across the Curriculum, and Second Language Writing: Implications for Research and Teaching, Michael-John DePalma and Jeffrey M. Ringer
Chapter 2. Developing Resources for Success: A Case Study of a Multilingual Graduate Writer, Talinn Phillips
Chapter 3. "Hey, Did You Get That?": L2 Student Reading Across the Curriculum, Carole Center and Michelle Niestepski
Chapter 4. Bridging the Gap between ESL Composition Programs and Disciplinary Writing: The Teaching and Learning of Summarization Skill, Qian Du
Chapter 5. On Class, Race, and Dynamics of Privilege: Supporting Generation 1.5 Writers Across the Curriculum, Kathryn Nielsen
Chapter 6. Writing Intensively: An Examination of the Performance of L2 Writers Across the Curriculum at an Urban Community College, Linda Hirsch

Section II. Faculty Concerns and Expectations for L2 Writers

Chapter 7. Negotiating "Errors" in L2 Writing: Faculty Dispositions and Language Difference, Terry Myers Zawacki and Anna Sophia Habib
Chapter 8. "I don't know if that was the right thing to do": Cross-Disciplinary/Cross-Institutional Faculty Response to L2 Writing, Lindsey Ives, Elizabeth Leahy, Anni Leming, Tom Pierce, and Michael Schwartz
Chapter 9. Let's See Where Your Chinese Students Come From: A Qualitative Descriptive Study of Writing in the Disciplines in China, Wu Dan
Chapter 10. English is Not a Spectator Sport: Privileged Second Language Learners and the For-Profit ESOL Classroom, Marino Fernandes
Chapter 11. Making Stance Explicit for Second Language Writers in the Disciplines: What Faculty Need to Know about the Language of Stancetaking, Zak Lancaster
Chapter 12. In Response to Today's "Felt Need": WAC, Faculty Development, and Second Language Writers, Michelle Cox

Section III. WAC Practices and Pedagogies Transformed

Chapter 13. Developing Writing-Intensive Courses for a Globalized Curriculum through WAC-TESOL Collaborations, Megan Siczek and Shawna Shapiro
Chapter 14. Graduate Writing Workshops: Crossing Languages and Disciplines, Elaine Fredericksen and Kate Mangelsdorf
Chapter 15. Teaching Writing in a Globally Networked Learning Environment (GNLE): Diverse Students at a Distance, Jennifer Lynn Craig
Chapter 16. Campus Internationalization: A Center-based Model for ESLready Programs, Karyn E. Mallett and Ghania Zgheib
Chapter 17. Reconstructing Teacher Roles through a Transnational Lens: Learning with/in the American University of Beirut, Amy Zenger, Joan Mullin, and Carol Peterson Haviland
Chapter 18. Writing Histories: Lingua Franca English in a Swedish Graduate Program, Thomas Lavelle and Alan Shima

Afterword: Writing Globally, Right Here, Right Now, Chris Thaiss
Notes on Editors and Contributors

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Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorics: Landmark Essays and Controversies

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-135-6

Edited by Lindal Buchanan and Kathleen J. Ryan

Lauer Series in Rhetoric and Composition
Edited by Patricia Sullivan, Catherine Hobbs, Thomas Rickert, and Jennifer Bay

Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorics coverInformation and Pricing
978-1-60235-135-6 (Paperback; $40.00; £26; €29; $44 AUD; $43 CAD); 978-1-60235-137-0 (Adobe eBook; $30.00; £20; €22; $34 AUD; $32 CAD). © 2010 by Parlor Press. 504 pages, with introduction, bibliographies, and index.

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Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorics FlyerDownload the publicity flyer and order form for this book for distribution to libraries, colleagues, and bookstores (PDF format).

Description

Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorics: Landmark Essays and Controversies gathers significant, oft-cited scholarship about feminism and rhetoric into one convenient volume. Essays examine the formation of the vibrant and growing field of feminist rhetoric; feminist historiographic research methods and methodologies; and women’s distinct sites, genres, and styles of rhetoric. The book’s most innovative and pedagogically useful  feature is its presentation of controversies in the form of case studies, each consisting of exchanges between or among scholars about significant questions. These debates have shaped the field’s past and continue to influence its present and future directions. The collection provides both students and teachers with an accessible introduction to and comprehensive overview of the intersections of feminisms and rhetorics.

In Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorics, Lindal Buchanan and Kathleen J. Ryan “have presented the field of feminist rhetorics . . . with an important and timely collection of primary scholarly work, the first collection of late twentieth and twenty-first century published scholarship in this field that they claim is here to stay. Feminist rhetorics, they assert, is ‘no longer a promising possibility or a nascent area of study but has, in fact, arrived.’ I agree with them, and I applaud their bold yet careful stance in framing this ‘walk through’ feminist rhetorics.”

— Kate Ronald, “Foreword”

Contributors include Barbara Biesecker, Patricia Bizzell, Karlyn Kohrs Campbell, Vicki Tolar Collins (Burton), Celeste. M. Condit, Robert Connors, Jane Donawerth, Bonnie J. Dow, ​Lisa Ede, Jessica Enoch, Sonja K. Foss, Xin Liu Gale, Cheryl Glenn, Cindy. L. Griffin, Susan Jarratt, Nan Johnson, Shirley Wilson Logan, Andrea Lunsford, Carol Mattingly, Roxanne Mountford, Mary Queen, Krista Ratcliffe, Susan Romano, Mary B. Tonn, Hui Wu, and Susan Zaeske.

About the Editors

Lindal Buchanan is Assistant Professor of English and Women’s Studies at Old Dominion University. Kathleen J. Ryan is Associate Professor of English and the Director of Composition at the University of Montana.

Contents

Introduction: Walking and Talking through the Field of Feminist Rhetorics
Lindal Buchanan and Kathleen J. Ryan

Part 1 Charting the Emergence of Feminist Rhetorics

Karlyn Kohrs Campbell, "Introduction" Man Cannot Speak for Her: A Critical Study of Early Feminist Rhetoric
Susan Jarratt, "Speaking to the Past: Feminist Historiography in Rhetoric"
Cheryl Glenn, "sex, lies, and manuscript: Refiguring Aspasia in the History of Rhetoric"
Lisa Ede, Cheryl Glenn, and Andrea Lunsford, "Border Crossings: Intersections of Rhetoric and Feminism"
Krista Ratcliffe, "Bathsheba's Dilemma: Defining, Discovering, and Defending Anglo-American Feminist Theories of Rhetorics(s)"

Part 2 Articulating and Enacting Feminist Methods and Methodologies

Patricia Bizzell, "Feminist Methods of Research in the History of Rhetoric: What Difference Do They Make?"
Susan Romano, "The Historical Catalina Hernández: Inhabiting the Topoi of Feminist Historiography"
Vicki Tolar Collins (Burton), "The Speaker Respoken: Rhetoric as Feminist Methodology"
Hui Wu, "Historical Studies of Women Here and There: Methodological Challenges to Dominant Interpretive Frameworks"
Jessica Enoch, "Survival Stories: Feminist Historiographic Approaches to Chicana Rhetorics of Sterilization Abuse"
Mary Queen, "Transnational Feminist Rhetorics in a Digital World"

Part 3 Exploring Gendered Sites, Genres, and Styles of Rhetoric

Jane Donawerth, "Conversation and the Boundaries of Public Discourse in Rhetorical Theory by Renaissance Women"
Susan Zaeske, "The 'Promiscuous Audience' Controversy and the Emergence of the Early Women's Rights Movement"
Shirley Wilson Logan, "Black Women on the Speaker's Platform (1832-1899)”
Nan Johnson, "Reigning in the Court of Silence: Women and Rhetorical Space in Postbellum America"
Carol Mattingly, "Woman's Temple, Women's Fountains: The Erasure of Public Memory"
Bonnie J .Dow and M. B Tonn, " 'Feminine Style' and Political Judgment in the Rhetoric of Ann Richards"

Part 4 Examining Controversies: Four Case Studies

Case Study 1 Debating Disciplinary Directions: Recovery versus Retheorizing
Barbara Biesecker, "Coming to Terms with Recent Attempts to Write Women into the History of Rhetoric"
Karlyn Kohrs Campbell, "Biesecker Cannot Speak for Her Either"

Case Study 2 Debating the Aims of Discourse: Persuasive versus Invitational Rhetoric, Samuel R Evans
Sonja K. Foss and Cindy L Griffin, "Beyond Persuasion: A Proposal for an Invitational Rhetoric"
Celeste M. Condit, "In Praise of Eloquent Diversity: Gender and Rhetoric as Public Persuasion"

Case Study 3 Debating Causality: Women and the Demise of Rhetorical Education
Robert Connors, "Gender Influences: Composition-Rhetoric as an Irenic Rhetoric"
Roxanne Mountford, "Feminization of Rhetoric?"

Case Study 4 Debating Ethos: Traditional versus Feminist Research Methods, Barbara Hebert
Xin Liu Gale, "Historical Studies and Postmodernism: Rereading Aspasia of Miletus"
Cheryl Glenn, "Comment: Truth, Lies, and Method: Revisiting Feminist Historiography"
Susan Jarratt, "Comment: Rhetoric and Feminism: Together Again"

Selected Bibliography
Works Cited
Index
About the Editors

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We'll See: Poems by Georges L. Godeau

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-283-4

We'll See: Poems by Georges L. Godeau

Translated by Kathleen McGookey

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-283-4  (paperback, $14; £10; $15 CAD; €12; $14 AUS); 978-1-60235-284-1 (ebook, $14; £10; $15 CAD; €12; $14 AUS) © 2012 by Parlor Press. 125 pages, in English translation.

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Description

We’ll See, originally published in France in 1995 as On Verra Bien by le dé bleu, is Georges L. Godeau’s first book translated into English.  This is a collection of ninety brief prose poems, most of which focus on ordinary people and events.  Godeau’s prose poems are disarmingly and deceptively simple, yet resonate with each other.  Godeau has said, “A poem should not last longer than its emotion.”  Still, his prose poems capture, almost photographically, moments of everyday life.  Jacques Reda has said that Godeau’s poetry is poetry of “what happens when nothing happens.”  In his account of a day spent with Godeau, Xavier Person observed that his poems were a lot like his modest house in Magné, France—a little cold, excessively clean, very tidy, and without a lot of furniture—poems that contained only the most straightforward and impassioned elements.

What people are saying . . .

In Georges Godeau’s We’ll See, the ordinary, quotidian details of everyday life reveal the miraculous lurking there, and each poem becomes a window on the absolute. These poems are quiet, efficient, but unsettling in their deep resonances. Although little happens in Godeau’s poems, each is filled with lucent, telling particulars. His poems, so calm on the surface, accrue enormous power. Like frames in a movie, each poem appears almost static, but in congress, they span immense psychic and spiritual geographies. Godeau exposes a world in which the marvelous is all around us, a world in which “Providence has blue eyes.” Godeau’s terse prose poems are the perfect vehicle for his modest, unassuming voice, and Kathleen McGookey has rendered Godeau’s laconic utterances in colloquial American English that is true to the original, and absolutely convincing in translation. —Gary Young

There’s no one else like Georges L. Godeau: he has invented a poetry of daily life with a gaze that is at once tender and concrete, almost objective (so he counts stars or people, years, the animals in a herd, he adds everything up). He pays attention to meek, ordinary people, to the delicate ties of friendship, and he says, “We’ll see,” and then it is clear like water. In Godeau’s poems, which contain nearly everything, everything is understandable. —Valérie Rouzeau

In these magical poems, trap doors open suddenly in ordinary scenes: If you are not big and strong you will not get the grilled salmon. A mother and daughter, after working hard, had lunched in town, like two ladies. A man refilling a prescription in a pharmacy remarks, out of nowhere, No, I don’t have a gun. I’m grateful to Kathleen McGookey for introducing me to this wonderful poet, and for her translations, which are so translucent I feel as if I’m reading the French originals through their clear lenses. I like to think of her book introducing Godeau’s sensibility to countless other readers, and their faces lighting with pleasure in one room, one town, one city after another, just as Godeau’s poems illuminate the people and places he writes about. —Sharon Bryan

About the Author

Georges L. Godeau was born in 1921 in Villiers-en-Plaine, France, and worked as an engineer, specializing in rural areas.  He also devoted himself to writing; his first book was published in 1962 and he published fifteen more books before his death in 1999.  Several more volumes have appeared posthumously.  His work won the Prix du Livre in Poitou-Charentes in 1991.

About the Translator

Kathleen McGookey received both her PhD in literature with a creative dissertation and her MFA in Poetry from Western Michigan University, and her BA in French from Hope College. For her translation of We’ll See, she received a Hemingway grant from the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Her book of prose poems, Whatever Shines, was published by White Pine Press. Her latest work is a chapbook entitled October Again (2012, Burnside Review Press).

 

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Wonder Rooms

$14.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-618-4

Allison Funk

Free Verse Editions
Edited by Jon Thompson

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-618-4 (paperback; $14) 978-1-60235-619-1 (PDF, $12) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 74 pages.

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Praise for Wonder Rooms

"The poems in Wonder Rooms, this powerful, heart-breaking, elegantly composed collection, are like the cabinets within such a room. Each is its own intimate interior space, where a reader is invited into the unknown. Some of these poetic spaces hold natural histories—crickets, dangerously beautiful corals, Provençal snails. Others open to the terrors of love and motherhood, still others to the chaotic orders of the bestiary. This is an amazingly gorgeous and intelligent book—a wonder, a pleasure, and an invitation to inward voyage."

 —Jennifer Atkinson

"In Wonder Rooms, her most intimate collection of poems, Allison Funk explores the intersection between the seen and the unseen. This territory of in-between is both fragile and terrifying. Nevertheless, she remains there, using "language as a lens to see through." Such seeing can be harrowing, but the poems, no matter what they light upon, are stunning in all senses of the word."

—Andrea Hollander

"In Wonder Rooms, Allison Funk gives us poems of uncompromising lyricism, many of which narrate obliquely the traumas of an adult son's mental illness. This volatile material is contained in poems linked by images of "rooms," as if the poet wants to contain the violence of his illness within the strictures of architecture. The wonder room becomes a metaphor for the strangeness of mental disorder and of existence itself. The book is a contemporary Stabat Mater. It bears much the same stark power as Michelangelo's Rondanini Pietà, in which the two unfinished bodies seem to grow out of each other, are so intimate, yet finally so apart."

—Donald Platt

About the Author

Allison Funk is the author of four previous books of poems, including, most recently, The Tumbling Box. The recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Samuel French Morse Poetry Prize, and the Society of Midland Authors Poetry Prize, she is a Distinguished Professor of English at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

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Working with Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice

$40.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-761-7

Edited by Theresa Lillis, Kathy Harrington, Mary R. Lea, and Sally Mitchell

Perspectives on Writing
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Rich Rice

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-761-7 (paperback, $40) 978-1-60235-762-4 (hardcover, $80) 978-1-60235-763-1 (PDF, $20 © 2015 by Theresa Lillis, Kathy Harrington, Mary R. Lea, and Sally Mitchell. 440 pages with notes and bibliography.

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Description

The editors and contributors to Working with Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice explore what it means to adopt an "academic literacies" approach in policy and pedagogy. Transformative practice is illustrated through case studies and critical commentaries from teacher-researchers working in a range of higher education contexts—from undergraduate to postgraduate levels, across disciplines, and spanning geopolitical regions including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Cataluña, Finland, France, Ireland, Portugal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Key questions addressed include: How can a wider range of semiotic resources and technologies fruitfully serve academic meaning and knowledge making? What kinds of writing spaces do we need and how can these be facilitated? How can theory and practice from "Academic Literacies" be used to open up debate about writing pedagogy at institutional and policy levels?

About the Editors

Theresa Lillis is Professor of English Language and Applied Linguistics at The Open University, UK. She has authored several books, including The Sociolinguistics of Writing (2013). Kathy Harrington is Principal Lecturer in Educational Development at London Metropolitan University. She is co-author (with Mick Healey and Abbi Flint) of Engagement through Partnership: Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (2014). Mary Lea is an Honorary Associate Reader in Academic and Digital Literacies at the Open University, UK. Her recent work considers the relationship of the digital to knowledge making practices in the university. Sally Mitchell is Head of Learning Development at Queen Mary University of London, where she established "Thinking Writing," a strand of development activity to support academic staff in the uses of writing in their disciplines and their teaching.

Contents and Contributors

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Writing Posthumanism, Posthuman Writing

$32.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-429-6

Edited by Sidney I. Dobrin

New Media Theory
Series Editor, Byron Hawk

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-429-6 (paperback, $32.00); 978-1-60235-430-2 (hardcover, $65.00); 978-1-60235-431-9 (Adobe eBook on CD, $20) © 2015 by Parlor Press. 317 pages, with notes, illustrations, bibliography, and index.

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Reviews

Christopher Guest, Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge 32 (2017).

Description

Writing Posthumanism, Posthuman Writing turns the posthumanist gaze upon writing. Ultimately, this collection considered the relationship between posthumanisms and writing with the aim of developing posthumanist theories of writing, theoretical possibilities generated from the dialectic between them.  Each of the sixteen contributors embraces the complexities and nascence of the very idea of posthumanism and the posthuman as indicative of the rich potential of inquiry under the posthuman umbrella. They provide more incentive to fragment the umbrella than to coalesce its subsumptions. Edited by Sidney I. Dobrin, Writing Posthumanism, Posthuman Writing  does not sum up or even dampen posthuman writing theories by curating them. Instead, these essays can be read as a jailbreak, as a public act of defiance, as an attempt to incite and disrupt Writing Studies from the constraints of humanist thought. Contributors include Michelle Ballif, Kate Birdsall, Bruce Clarke, D. Diane Davis, Julie Drew, Kristie S. Fleckenstien, Byron Hawk, Kyle Jensen, Chris Lindgren, Melissa M. Littlefield, Andrew Mara, Sean Morey, J. A. Rice, Jim Ridolfo, and Lynn Worsham. They write about symbol-using animals, trauma studies, zombies, postsexual subjects, prosthetic spaces, posthumanist style, human and nonhuman actors, technological deism, object-oriented rhetorics, graphology and neuroscience, spam, cyborgs, cybernetics, and more.

About the Editor

Sidney I. Dobrin is Professor of English and Director/Editor of the TRACE Innovation Initiative at the University of Florida. He is author and editor of many books and articles, including Gone. Fishing. Recreational Saltwater Sportfishing and the Future of the World's Oceans (forthcoming, Texas A&M University Press).

Contents

Introduction by Sidney I. Dobrin "Moving Beyond the Logic of Sacrifice: Animal Studies, Trauma Studies, and the Path to Posthumanism" by Lynn Worsham
"Writing-Being: Another Look at the "Symbol-Using Animal'" by D. Diane Davis
"Zombies / Writing: Awaiting Our Posthumous, Monstrous (Be)Coming" by Michelle Ballif
"Wanting Ourselves: Writing (And) The Postsexual Subject" by Kate Birdsall and Julie Drew
"Becoming T@iled" by Sean Morey
"Inscriptions of the Possible; or, A Pedagogy of Posthumanist Style" by J. A. Rice
"Rethinking Human and Non-Human Actors as a Strategy for Rhetorical Delivery" by Jim Ridolfo
"Utopian Laptop Initiatives: From Technological Deism to Object-Oriented Rhetoric" by Byron Hawk, Chris Lindgren, and Andrew Mara
"From Handwriting to 'Brain' Writing: Graphology and the Neuroscientific Turn" by Melissa M. Littlefield
"I am Spam; A Posthuman Approach to Writer's Block" by Kyle Jensen
"Cyborg Vision for Cyborg Writing" by Kristie S. Fleckenstien
"Evolutionary Equality: Neocybernetic Posthumanism and Margulis and Sagan's Writing Practice" by Bruce Clarke
Index
Contributors

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Writing Program Administration and the Community College

$30.00
SKU: 978-1-60235-359-6

Heather Ostman

Writing Program Administration
Series Editors: Susan H. McLeod and Margot Soven

Information and Pricing
978-1-60235-359-6 (paperback, $30), 978-1-60235-360-2 (hardcover, $60), 978-1-60235-361-9 (Adobe ebook, $20). © 2013 by Parlor Press. 241 pages, with notes, bibliography, and index.

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Description

Writing Program Administration and the Community College offers a comprehensive study of the administration of writing programs at public, two-year institutions. Author Heather Ostman describes the community college’s diverse students who shape its mission with their changing needs and demographics. A history of the community college places the institution within the broader context of American higher education and is followed by practical information about the day-to-day work of the writing program administrator at the two-year college. Writing Program Administration and the Community College also addresses current issues and concerns faced by WPAs and writing instructors, including the politics of and future for composition at community colleges. Writing Program Administration and the Community College will deepen the understanding of composition and WPA work at this institution for all WPAs—at community colleges and four-year institutions, composition instructors, college administrators, and graduate students pursuing careers in the field.

About the Author

Heather Ostman is an associate professor and the assistant chair of the SUNY Westchester Community College English Department, where she teaches courses in writing and literature. Her work has appeared in essay collections and in journals such as College Composition and Communication, Women’s Studies, Prose Studies, Philological Quarterly, and New Writing. She is also the editor of Kate Chopin in the Twenty-First Century: New Critical Essays (2008) and serves as the President of the Kate Chopin International Society.

Contents

Introduction
1 Community College Students                                 
2 Writing Program Administration at the Community College:
3 The General Responsibilities of Community College WPAs     
4 Community College WPA Work in the Era of Constant Change
5 Conclusion: Community College WPAs as Educational Leaders
6 Continuing the Conversation: A Selective List for Further Reading
Notes   
Appendix A: The Portland Resolution    
Appendix B: WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition                          
Works Cited       
Index    
About the Author

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Price: $30.00